4 rules for social media success: Luxury brands

by Urs E. Gattiker on 2009/10/29 · 85 comments 18,073 views

in c corporate blogging,e marketing 101 serving a need,e marketing 101 style matters

Do 400,000 Twitter followers or Facebook friends equal even one sale?

Image - Paris Fashion Fall 2009 - Rochas model - showing me your products - is that good enough to entice me to come back?This is an important issue because the luxury industry is embracing social media by increasingly streaming shows live on the web.

Examples are such as Burberry, Dolce & Gabbana, Alexander McQueen), tweeting at all hours and investing heavily in corporate blogs.

One of marketing experts’ great misconceptions is that social media is not effective for luxury brands. Below we share some recent discussions with a client recently.

Find out more be reading this blog post

Problem: Websites are too boring for the Facebook generation
As does our client’s site, many luxury brands have wonderful websites that use flash, pictures, graphics and videos. However, today’s 25-year-olds grew up with email, listening to podcast university lectures or reading case studies on their Kindle. Such an audience yawns in the face of static content, such as a website’s flash presentation.Image - Wellendorf Golden Seduction - the jewelry you always wanted but could never find is here

We asked our counterparts something like:

    “Please explain how such a use of Internet technology encourages engagement and conversation between the brand and your brand’s target audience?”

We pointed out that current and potential clients might never come back after visiting the webpage just once… Clearly a lost opportunity for long-term engagement.

Challenge: Satisfying people raised on Twitter and YouTube
We can agree that emotion, inspiration and reputation is critical for luxury brands. The key issue is where and how to find potential clients. This is where social media can help because younger and future clients use social media a lot.

Image - Primus Chronometer - the ultimate watch for connoisseursFor example, a primary reason for having a blog is to filter prospects, enhancing your relationship with those who have an inclination for what you promote and discarding those who would never purchase your product. A successful blog zeros in on ideal prospects and pre-sells them with related content that they value.

We asked one luxury brand representative:

    “How do you intend to reach 20-somethings brought up on a diet of video games, YouTube, Facebook and Twitter?”

Unless one meets these people where they hang out in cyberspace and provides them with the opportunity to engage or join the conversation, how can customers be attracted from this group at all, in the next five years?

Take-aways for luxury brands

    1. Embracing social media is a good start – but streaming your shows live on the web, might not be the way to get closer to clients that are likely to purchase – engagement is key
    2. Corporate blogs help communicating with customer groups – content offered must be valued by target group(s), such as discussing industry and fashion trends, innovation by competitors and so forth. Hence, talking about your product is the wrong strategy.
    3. Connecting means engaging –  responding to each comment left on the blog or inquiry sent via Twitter or e-mail is a first step to start the conversation going with those that are interested in the brand and its products.
    4. 20-somethings have a desire for technical mastery and structured solutions - establishing an effective presence in the social media space must be a strategic activity now, otherwise how can one expand one’s market or even less protect it with this age group?

More resources about social media marketing and the c-suite:

Bottom line
Your social media activity must provide clients with content and information that they want to read or hear about. Similar to having a customer magazine that gets recycled without being read by many, a blog that does not interest your clients is a wasted activity. At the same time, ignoring social media in order to engage clients while your customers are increasingly using it is an exercise in denial. In short, this trend provides another opportunity to sell more product. Ignore it at your own peril!

It might not be until the product’s unique design and patterns are shown to a group of clients that a knee-jerk desire – oh, I want that – rears its head. However, corporate blogging is an important part of your marketing net, along with other social media, that will ultimately lead 20-somethings to enter a store and ask to see your product. Can you afford to miss this opportunity?

Just as having a fax machine empowered clients in the ’90s to quickly share documents with suppliers, social media is a tool that should be put to use sooner rather than later in order to engage customers who use this technology. The key is to understand that social media is an important operator, or at least a moderating factor, that will ultimately become part of your marketing strategy for getting clients to sign on the dotted line.

Got an idea? Leave a comment! We love to hear your thoughts: how do you think luxury brands will change how they use social media? Here is a chance for anyone with first-hand knowledge (this means you!) to share any lessons learned.

  • http://deborahdrake.com/Blog Deborah Drake – Catalyst

    My nickel:

    Whatever channels promote awareness are the ones to pursue, and even though some time and patience must be invested, engaging in social media and blogging ARE as important to business as the FAX machine was previously.
    And the early adopters will benefit as they log more hours and refine their practices and posts and perhaps slowly gain ground.

    But the point is they will over time gain ground. By being clever? Maybe…By being real? Definitely!
    .-= ´s last blog ..Social Networking: Am I Still Wasting Time? =-.

    • http://howto.commetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

      Deborah
      Thanks so much for your insightful contribution.

      I find your point that those luxury brands that embrace social media will gain ground on their competitors right on the money…

      Certainly true,, since once you have marked the territory… winner takes most if not all may apply here once again.

      Thank you

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  • http://www.ipenforcement.wordpress.com Nils Montan

    The old hollywood phrase “content is king” has a lot of applicability on social and professional networking site, blogs and corporate web pages.

    The important thing is daily updating with some interesting information – not flash and glitter.

    Urs has really put his finger on the pulse here. If you want to be put to sleep some night – check out the web pages of law firms. ZZZZZZZZZZZZZ

    .-= ´s last blog ..IP Owners Need To Do More – Including Spending MONEY =-.

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  • http://info.cytrap.eu Urs E. Gattiker

    Nils

    Thanks for sharing this insight.

    So besides lxury brands, law firms seem to also want to improve by starting to engage better with their potential as well as current clients.

    Hopefully the start today and don’t wait until it might be too late to have an impact.
    .-= ´s last blog ..3 golden rules for social media marketing =-.

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  • http://www.AceJewelers.com/ Alon Ben Joseph

    Nice article. We agree! We are one of the first jewelers that are authorized to sell high-end watches and fine jewelry online. We are online since 1998, but only launched our eBoutique (http://www.AceJewelers.com) last year! We blog since 2007 (http://www.AceBlog.info), we FaceBook, we Twitter, we Hyve, etc (see 'Connect with Ace'-page here: http://www.acejewelers.com/Connect

    Recently we adapted the Gary Vaynerchuck strategy and started: http://www.AceJewelers.TV

    We feel that the luxury industry indeed needs to learn to adapt the new tools out there and therefore the new generation has to learn that the 'old-school' luxury industry has adapted these tools. We offer live chat and free call-back features on our website, but we notice our customers don't believe it works on a jeweler's website. When we ask, they say they have a “to good to be true” feeling that we offer these new tools.

    Would love to hear your experiences…

    • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

      Dear Alon

      Love this comment, very nice illustration of what can be done including the links

      Nevertheless, that your customers feel it may not work on a jeweler's website surprises me quite a bit.

      My experience is that depending on what you offer on a blog or Facebook, if your client see the content as being valuable – i.e. not pushing product but providing information that is helpful about trends, etc. – people take advantage of the offerings.

      I agree with you, however, that it takes time and more often than not, the stumbling block is the CEO that finds having VIP events, sending out brochures, etc. is the strategy to pursue, while the blog or or static webpage can add little if anything to these efforts.

      Once the c-suite people are convinced that social media can support the company's marketing effort(s) than the company can start embracing social media. Until then, many luxury brands will continue being happy to show you a static webpage with some kind of presentation that first requires one to download a flash presentation.

      A clear case where design overshadows usability concerns and engagement of the visitor/client has been forgotten.

      Alon, thanks for sharing and I wish you much success with your social media strategy as outlined in your comment and illustrated on your sites.

      Regards
      Urs

      • http://twitter.com/alonbj Alon Ben Joseph

        Dear Urs,

        thank for your feedback again :)

        Team engagement is indeed where it starts… And, then usuability indeed is something that should be as important. I agree.

        We have a long way to go, but we are getting there :)

        Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year!

        Yours truly,

        Alon

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  • http://www.pookymedia.com/ pookyamsterdam

    Selling online also means developing advertising which is built for this medium – We recently completed a 60 second spot for a virtual luxury line – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jb5henlDHfs
    Its a remarkably effective way of showcasing the product, and very cost effective. We can also crreate any 3D replica of your product in virtual assets.
    info@pookymedia.com to reach us.

    • http://twitter.com/alonbj Alon Ben Joseph

      Hi Pooky,

      thanks for sharing. I had a look at your YouTube movie, looks amazing.

      Do you also work with Augmented Reality? Please have a look at this article:

      http://www.diamonds.net/News/NewsItem.aspx?Arti

      And then try the app yourself, here: http://www.acejewelers.com/Ace-Eternity-Pave-Ri

      • http://www.pookymedia.com/ pookyamsterdam

        Thank you Alon,

        Your work with AR is very impressive. We don't use it within Second Life, which is our main graphical platform for video. I do see a virtual reality application for your product though.
        Here are two films which you might be interested in, one is a “lifestyle” sort of video (with a very recognizable life) The Spy Who Lives Here
        Winner of SL London Arts Festival for Machinima
        http://bit.ly/Q4I3p
        and one a commercial for a beverage, with a different kind of lifestyle.
        http://bit.ly/jEpf5

        • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

          @acejewelers @pookymedia,

          Interesting discussion and fun movies to watch. Amazing what one can do with visuals….. next time I buy my jewellery this way…. I am smiling.

          Thanks for sharing.

        • http://twitter.com/alonbj Alon Ben Joseph

          @ComMetrics: LOL! You are welcome.

          Definitely check out our eBoutique: http://www.AceJewelers.com for all your watches & jewelry needs ;)

          Happy New Year.

        • http://twitter.com/alonbj Alon Ben Joseph

          Hi Pooky,

          you are welcome. Thank you for sharing these two movies, looks very interesting. I can imagine that these tools can be great for major brands. I have no experience with Second Life. It was a huge hype couple of years ago in The Netherlands and now you don't hear anything about it any more. Especially as a commercial tool. I have high expectations of Augmented Reality for eCommerce and mCommerce. I truly believe that is the future of Digital Commercem and especially for cross-channel retail.

          Keep up the good work. Very impressive.

          Happy New Year.

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  • Larry

    Good points…There seems to be a few platforms popping up on the radar…Qubers, Asmallworld, Elixio and Gilt…They're all targeting a very critical niche and seems to be positioned well.

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    Larry, thanks for this comment.nnQUBE,u00a0AsmallWorld andu00a0Elixio (PS. click on names to visit website) are interesting examples ofu00a0u00a0social communities that try to select their members based on certain factors (e.g., income and age). u00a0Although it is not always clear how they decide who to admit and who to reject:nn”Members are invited through the community itself or alternatively can register by emailing qube@quintessentially.com“.nPS: quintessentially – company that owns QUBE – is a Concierge service in the UK with membership fees of u00a3750 – 24,000 per yearnnGilt (click to visit website) is an online store that tries to sell luxury goods at a discount. u00a0However, one cannot purchase some of the most famous brandsu00a0through this channel. u00a0Hence, I am not sure how it relates to using social media more effectively as a luxury brand.nnCartier, Mont Blanc, Aston Martin, Tiffany and others use QUBE for running traditional banner ads. However, I wonder if this allows these brands to really connect to the active QUBER or AsmallWorld members. It might be a better idea to host a forum or to sponsor a sweepstake competition.nnQUBE,u00a0AsmallWorld andu00a0Elixio are communities whose success from the luxury brand’s point of view depends on how desirable their users are (e.g., willingeness to engage with brand).nMost importantly, without having a supporting social media presence (e.g., blogs, newsletters and NO – a flash presentation will not do, thank you) it is unlikely that such communities can help luxury brands to improve relations with members from within these communities. nnIt seems the examples you have shown are interesting but if they will succeed is still unclear. Most importantly, unless luxury brands brush up on social media skills they will eventually discover that spending money on these communities is not effective.nnRespectfullynUrs @ComMetticsnn

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    Larry, thanks for this comment.nnQUBE,u00a0AsmallWorld andu00a0Elixio (PS. click on names to visit website) are interesting examples ofu00a0u00a0social communities that try to select their members based on certain factors (e.g., income and age). u00a0Although it is not always clear how they decide who to admit and who to reject:nn”Members are invited through the community itself or alternatively can register by emailing qube@quintessentially.com“.nPS: quintessentially – company that owns QUBE – is a Concierge service in the UK with membership fees of u00a3750 – 24,000 per yearnnGilt (click to visit website) is an online store that tries to sell luxury goods at a discount. u00a0However, one cannot purchase some of the most famous brandsu00a0through this channel. u00a0Hence, I am not sure how it relates to using social media more effectively as a luxury brand.nnCartier, Mont Blanc, Aston Martin, Tiffany and others use QUBE for running traditional banner ads. However, I wonder if this allows these brands to really connect to the active QUBER or AsmallWorld members. It might be a better idea to host a forum or to sponsor a sweepstake competition.nnQUBE,u00a0AsmallWorld andu00a0Elixio are communities whose success from the luxury brand’s point of view depends on how desirable their users are (e.g., willingeness to engage with brand).nMost importantly, without having a supporting social media presence (e.g., blogs, newsletters and NO – a flash presentation will not do, thank you) it is unlikely that such communities can help luxury brands to improve relations with members from within these communities. nnIt seems the examples you have shown are interesting but if they will succeed is still unclear. Most importantly, unless luxury brands brush up on social media skills they will eventually discover that spending money on these communities is not effective.nnRespectfullynUrs @ComMetticsnn

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    Larry, thanks for this comment.nnQUBE,u00a0AsmallWorld andu00a0Elixio (PS. click on names to visit website) are interesting examples ofu00a0u00a0social communities that try to select their members based on certain factors (e.g., income and age). u00a0Although it is not always clear how they decide who to admit and who to reject:nn”Members are invited through the community itself or alternatively can register by emailing qube@quintessentially.com“.nPS: quintessentially – company that owns QUBE – is a Concierge service in the UK with membership fees of u00a3750 – 24,000 per yearnnGilt (click to visit website) is an online store that tries to sell luxury goods at a discount. u00a0However, one cannot purchase some of the most famous brandsu00a0through this channel. u00a0Hence, I am not sure how it relates to using social media more effectively as a luxury brand.nnCartier, Mont Blanc, Aston Martin, Tiffany and others use QUBE for running traditional banner ads. However, I wonder if this allows these brands to really connect to the active QUBER or AsmallWorld members. It might be a better idea to host a forum or to sponsor a sweepstake competition.nnQUBE,u00a0AsmallWorld andu00a0Elixio are communities whose success from the luxury brand’s point of view depends on how desirable their users are (e.g., willingeness to engage with brand).nMost importantly, without having a supporting social media presence (e.g., blogs, newsletters and NO – a flash presentation will not do, thank you) it is unlikely that such communities can help luxury brands to improve relations with members from within these communities. nnIt seems the examples you have shown are interesting but if they will succeed is still unclear. Most importantly, unless luxury brands brush up on social media skills they will eventually discover that spending money on these communities is not effective.nnRespectfullynUrs @ComMetticsnn

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    Larry, thanks for this comment.nnQUBE,u00a0AsmallWorld andu00a0Elixio (PS. click on names to visit website) are interesting examples ofu00a0u00a0social communities that try to select their members based on certain factors (e.g., income and age). u00a0Although it is not always clear how they decide who to admit and who to reject:nn”Members are invited through the community itself or alternatively can register by emailing qube@quintessentially.com“.nPS: quintessentially – company that owns QUBE – is a Concierge service in the UK with membership fees of u00a3750 – 24,000 per yearnnGilt (click to visit website) is an online store that tries to sell luxury goods at a discount. u00a0However, one cannot purchase some of the most famous brandsu00a0through this channel. u00a0Hence, I am not sure how it relates to using social media more effectively as a luxury brand.nnCartier, Mont Blanc, Aston Martin, Tiffany and others use QUBE for running traditional banner ads. However, I wonder if this allows these brands to really connect to the active QUBER or AsmallWorld members. It might be a better idea to host a forum or to sponsor a sweepstake competition.nnQUBE,u00a0AsmallWorld andu00a0Elixio are communities whose success from the luxury brand’s point of view depends on how desirable their users are (e.g., willingeness to engage with brand).nMost importantly, without having a supporting social media presence (e.g., blogs, newsletters and NO – a flash presentation will not do, thank you) it is unlikely that such communities can help luxury brands to improve relations with members from within these communities. nnIt seems the examples you have shown are interesting but if they will succeed is still unclear. Most importantly, unless luxury brands brush up on social media skills they will eventually discover that spending money on these communities is not effective.nnRespectfullynUrs @ComMetticsnn

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    Larry, thanks for this comment.nnQUBE,u00a0AsmallWorld andu00a0Elixio (PS. click on names to visit website) are interesting examples ofu00a0u00a0social communities that try to select their members based on certain factors (e.g., income and age). u00a0Although it is not always clear how they decide who to admit and who to reject:nn”Members are invited through the community itself or alternatively can register by emailing qube@quintessentially.com“.nPS: quintessentially – company that owns QUBE – is a Concierge service in the UK with membership fees of u00a3750 – 24,000 per yearnnGilt (click to visit website) is an online store that tries to sell luxury goods at a discount. u00a0However, one cannot purchase some of the most famous brandsu00a0through this channel. u00a0Hence, I am not sure how it relates to using social media more effectively as a luxury brand.nnCartier, Mont Blanc, Aston Martin, Tiffany and others use QUBE for running traditional banner ads. However, I wonder if this allows these brands to really connect to the active QUBER or AsmallWorld members. It might be a better idea to host a forum or to sponsor a sweepstake competition.nnQUBE,u00a0AsmallWorld andu00a0Elixio are communities whose success from the luxury brand’s point of view depends on how desirable their users are (e.g., willingeness to engage with brand).nMost importantly, without having a supporting social media presence (e.g., blogs, newsletters and NO – a flash presentation will not do, thank you) it is unlikely that such communities can help luxury brands to improve relations with members from within these communities. nnIt seems the examples you have shown are interesting but if they will succeed is still unclear. Most importantly, unless luxury brands brush up on social media skills they will eventually discover that spending money on these communities is not effective.nnRespectfullynUrs @ComMetticsnn

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    Larry, thanks for this comment.nnQUBE,u00a0AsmallWorld andu00a0Elixio (PS. click on names to visit website) are interesting examples ofu00a0u00a0social communities that try to select their members based on certain factors (e.g., income and age). u00a0Although it is not always clear how they decide who to admit and who to reject:nn”Members are invited through the community itself or alternatively can register by emailing qube@quintessentially.com“.nPS: quintessentially – company that owns QUBE – is a Concierge service in the UK with membership fees of u00a3750 – 24,000 per yearnnGilt (click to visit website) is an online store that tries to sell luxury goods at a discount. u00a0However, one cannot purchase some of the most famous brandsu00a0through this channel. u00a0Hence, I am not sure how it relates to using social media more effectively as a luxury brand.nnCartier, Mont Blanc, Aston Martin, Tiffany and others use QUBE for running traditional banner ads. However, I wonder if this allows these brands to really connect to the active QUBER or AsmallWorld members. It might be a better idea to host a forum or to sponsor a sweepstake competition.nnQUBE,u00a0AsmallWorld andu00a0Elixio are communities whose success from the luxury brand’s point of view depends on how desirable their users are (e.g., willingeness to engage with brand).nMost importantly, without having a supporting social media presence (e.g., blogs, newsletters and NO – a flash presentation will not do, thank you) it is unlikely that such communities can help luxury brands to improve relations with members from within these communities. nnIt seems the examples you have shown are interesting but if they will succeed is still unclear. Most importantly, unless luxury brands brush up on social media skills they will eventually discover that spending money on these communities is not effective.nnRespectfullynUrs @ComMetticsnn

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    Larry, thanks for this comment.nnQUBE,u00a0AsmallWorld andu00a0Elixio (PS. click on names to visit website) are interesting examples ofu00a0u00a0social communities that try to select their members based on certain factors (e.g., income and age). u00a0Although it is not always clear how they decide who to admit and who to reject:nn”Members are invited through the community itself or alternatively can register by emailing qube@quintessentially.com“.nPS: quintessentially – company that owns QUBE – is a Concierge service in the UK with membership fees of u00a3750 – 24,000 per yearnnGilt (click to visit website) is an online store that tries to sell luxury goods at a discount. u00a0However, one cannot purchase some of the most famous brandsu00a0through this channel. u00a0Hence, I am not sure how it relates to using social media more effectively as a luxury brand.nnCartier, Mont Blanc, Aston Martin, Tiffany and others use QUBE for running traditional banner ads. However, I wonder if this allows these brands to really connect to the active QUBER or AsmallWorld members. It might be a better idea to host a forum or to sponsor a sweepstake competition.nnQUBE,u00a0AsmallWorld andu00a0Elixio are communities whose success from the luxury brand’s point of view depends on how desirable their users are (e.g., willingeness to engage with brand).nMost importantly, without having a supporting social media presence (e.g., blogs, newsletters and NO – a flash presentation will not do, thank you) it is unlikely that such communities can help luxury brands to improve relations with members from within these communities. nnIt seems the examples you have shown are interesting but if they will succeed is still unclear. Most importantly, unless luxury brands brush up on social media skills they will eventually discover that spending money on these communities is not effective.nnRespectfullynUrs @ComMetticsnn

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    Larry, thanks for this comment.nnQUBE,u00a0AsmallWorld andu00a0Elixio (PS. click on names to visit website) are interesting examples ofu00a0u00a0social communities that try to select their members based on certain factors (e.g., income and age). u00a0Although it is not always clear how they decide who to admit and who to reject:nn”Members are invited through the community itself or alternatively can register by emailing qube@quintessentially.com“.nPS: quintessentially – company that owns QUBE – is a Concierge service in the UK with membership fees of u00a3750 – 24,000 per yearnnGilt (click to visit website) is an online store that tries to sell luxury goods at a discount. u00a0However, one cannot purchase some of the most famous brandsu00a0through this channel. u00a0Hence, I am not sure how it relates to using social media more effectively as a luxury brand.nnCartier, Mont Blanc, Aston Martin, Tiffany and others use QUBE for running traditional banner ads. However, I wonder if this allows these brands to really connect to the active QUBER or AsmallWorld members. It might be a better idea to host a forum or to sponsor a sweepstake competition.nnQUBE,u00a0AsmallWorld andu00a0Elixio are communities whose success from the luxury brand’s point of view depends on how desirable their users are (e.g., willingeness to engage with brand).nMost importantly, without having a supporting social media presence (e.g., blogs, newsletters and NO – a flash presentation will not do, thank you) it is unlikely that such communities can help luxury brands to improve relations with members from within these communities. nnIt seems the examples you have shown are interesting but if they will succeed is still unclear. Most importantly, unless luxury brands brush up on social media skills they will eventually discover that spending money on these communities is not effective.nnRespectfullynUrs @ComMetticsnn

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    Larry, thanks for this comment.nnQUBE,u00a0AsmallWorld andu00a0Elixio (PS. click on names to visit website) are interesting examples ofu00a0u00a0social communities that try to select their members based on certain factors (e.g., income and age). u00a0Although it is not always clear how they decide who to admit and who to reject:nn”Members are invited through the community itself or alternatively can register by emailing qube@quintessentially.com“.nPS: quintessentially – company that owns QUBE – is a Concierge service in the UK with membership fees of u00a3750 – 24,000 per yearnnGilt (click to visit website) is an online store that tries to sell luxury goods at a discount. u00a0However, one cannot purchase some of the most famous brandsu00a0through this channel. u00a0Hence, I am not sure how it relates to using social media more effectively as a luxury brand.nnCartier, Mont Blanc, Aston Martin, Tiffany and others use QUBE for running traditional banner ads. However, I wonder if this allows these brands to really connect to the active QUBER or AsmallWorld members. It might be a better idea to host a forum or to sponsor a sweepstake competition.nnQUBE,u00a0AsmallWorld andu00a0Elixio are communities whose success from the luxury brand’s point of view depends on how desirable their users are (e.g., willingeness to engage with brand).nMost importantly, without having a supporting social media presence (e.g., blogs, newsletters and NO – a flash presentation will not do, thank you) it is unlikely that such communities can help luxury brands to improve relations with members from within these communities. nnIt seems the examples you have shown are interesting but if they will succeed is still unclear. Most importantly, unless luxury brands brush up on social media skills they will eventually discover that spending money on these communities is not effective.nnRespectfullynUrs @ComMetticsnn

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    Larry, thanks for this comment.nnQUBE,u00a0AsmallWorld andu00a0Elixio (PS. click on names to visit website) are interesting examples ofu00a0u00a0social communities that try to select their members based on certain factors (e.g., income and age). u00a0Although it is not always clear how they decide who to admit and who to reject:nn”Members are invited through the community itself or alternatively can register by emailing qube@quintessentially.com“.nPS: quintessentially – company that owns QUBE – is a Concierge service in the UK with membership fees of u00a3750 – 24,000 per yearnnGilt (click to visit website) is an online store that tries to sell luxury goods at a discount. u00a0However, one cannot purchase some of the most famous brandsu00a0through this channel. u00a0Hence, I am not sure how it relates to using social media more effectively as a luxury brand.nnCartier, Mont Blanc, Aston Martin, Tiffany and others use QUBE for running traditional banner ads. However, I wonder if this allows these brands to really connect to the active QUBER or AsmallWorld members. It might be a better idea to host a forum or to sponsor a sweepstake competition.nnQUBE,u00a0AsmallWorld andu00a0Elixio are communities whose success from the luxury brand’s point of view depends on how desirable their users are (e.g., willingeness to engage with brand).nMost importantly, without having a supporting social media presence (e.g., blogs, newsletters and NO – a flash presentation will not do, thank you) it is unlikely that such communities can help luxury brands to improve relations with members from within these communities. nnIt seems the examples you have shown are interesting but if they will succeed is still unclear. Most importantly, unless luxury brands brush up on social media skills they will eventually discover that spending money on these communities is not effective.nnRespectfullynUrs @ComMetticsnn

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    Larry, thanks for this comment.nnQUBE,u00a0AsmallWorld andu00a0Elixio (PS. click on names to visit website) are interesting examples ofu00a0u00a0social communities that try to select their members based on certain factors (e.g., income and age). u00a0Although it is not always clear how they decide who to admit and who to reject:nn”Members are invited through the community itself or alternatively can register by emailing qube@quintessentially.com“.nPS: quintessentially – company that owns QUBE – is a Concierge service in the UK with membership fees of u00a3750 – 24,000 per yearnnGilt (click to visit website) is an online store that tries to sell luxury goods at a discount. u00a0However, one cannot purchase some of the most famous brandsu00a0through this channel. u00a0Hence, I am not sure how it relates to using social media more effectively as a luxury brand.nnCartier, Mont Blanc, Aston Martin, Tiffany and others use QUBE for running traditional banner ads. However, I wonder if this allows these brands to really connect to the active QUBER or AsmallWorld members. It might be a better idea to host a forum or to sponsor a sweepstake competition.nnQUBE,u00a0AsmallWorld andu00a0Elixio are communities whose success from the luxury brand’s point of view depends on how desirable their users are (e.g., willingeness to engage with brand).nMost importantly, without having a supporting social media presence (e.g., blogs, newsletters and NO – a flash presentation will not do, thank you) it is unlikely that such communities can help luxury brands to improve relations with members from within these communities. nnIt seems the examples you have shown are interesting but if they will succeed is still unclear. Most importantly, unless luxury brands brush up on social media skills they will eventually discover that spending money on these communities is not effective.nnRespectfullynUrs @ComMetticsnn

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    Larry, thanks for this comment.nnQUBE,u00a0AsmallWorld andu00a0Elixio (PS. click on names to visit website) are interesting examples ofu00a0u00a0social communities that try to select their members based on certain factors (e.g., income and age). u00a0Although it is not always clear how they decide who to admit and who to reject:nn”Members are invited through the community itself or alternatively can register by emailing qube@quintessentially.com“.nPS: quintessentially – company that owns QUBE – is a Concierge service in the UK with membership fees of u00a3750 – 24,000 per yearnnGilt (click to visit website) is an online store that tries to sell luxury goods at a discount. u00a0However, one cannot purchase some of the most famous brandsu00a0through this channel. u00a0Hence, I am not sure how it relates to using social media more effectively as a luxury brand.nnCartier, Mont Blanc, Aston Martin, Tiffany and others use QUBE for running traditional banner ads. However, I wonder if this allows these brands to really connect to the active QUBER or AsmallWorld members. It might be a better idea to host a forum or to sponsor a sweepstake competition.nnQUBE,u00a0AsmallWorld andu00a0Elixio are communities whose success from the luxury brand’s point of view depends on how desirable their users are (e.g., willingeness to engage with brand).nMost importantly, without having a supporting social media presence (e.g., blogs, newsletters and NO – a flash presentation will not do, thank you) it is unlikely that such communities can help luxury brands to improve relations with members from within these communities. nnIt seems the examples you have shown are interesting but if they will succeed is still unclear. Most importantly, unless luxury brands brush up on social media skills they will eventually discover that spending money on these communities is not effective.nnRespectfullynUrs @ComMetticsnn

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    Larry, thanks for this comment.nnQUBE,u00a0AsmallWorld andu00a0Elixio (PS. click on names to visit website) are interesting examples ofu00a0u00a0social communities that try to select their members based on certain factors (e.g., income and age). u00a0Although it is not always clear how they decide who to admit and who to reject:nn”Members are invited through the community itself or alternatively can register by emailing qube@quintessentially.com“.nPS: quintessentially – company that owns QUBE – is a Concierge service in the UK with membership fees of u00a3750 – 24,000 per yearnnGilt (click to visit website) is an online store that tries to sell luxury goods at a discount. u00a0However, one cannot purchase some of the most famous brandsu00a0through this channel. u00a0Hence, I am not sure how it relates to using social media more effectively as a luxury brand.nnCartier, Mont Blanc, Aston Martin, Tiffany and others use QUBE for running traditional banner ads. However, I wonder if this allows these brands to really connect to the active QUBER or AsmallWorld members. It might be a better idea to host a forum or to sponsor a sweepstake competition.nnQUBE,u00a0AsmallWorld andu00a0Elixio are communities whose success from the luxury brand’s point of view depends on how desirable their users are (e.g., willingeness to engage with brand).nMost importantly, without having a supporting social media presence (e.g., blogs, newsletters and NO – a flash presentation will not do, thank you) it is unlikely that such communities can help luxury brands to improve relations with members from within these communities. nnIt seems the examples you have shown are interesting but if they will succeed is still unclear. Most importantly, unless luxury brands brush up on social media skills they will eventually discover that spending money on these communities is not effective.nnRespectfullynUrs @ComMetticsnn

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    Larry, thanks for this comment.nnQUBE,u00a0AsmallWorld andu00a0Elixio (PS. click on names to visit website) are interesting examples ofu00a0u00a0social communities that try to select their members based on certain factors (e.g., income and age). u00a0Although it is not always clear how they decide who to admit and who to reject:nn”Members are invited through the community itself or alternatively can register by emailing qube@quintessentially.com“.nPS: quintessentially – company that owns QUBE – is a Concierge service in the UK with membership fees of u00a3750 – 24,000 per yearnnGilt (click to visit website) is an online store that tries to sell luxury goods at a discount. u00a0However, one cannot purchase some of the most famous brandsu00a0through this channel. u00a0Hence, I am not sure how it relates to using social media more effectively as a luxury brand.nnCartier, Mont Blanc, Aston Martin, Tiffany and others use QUBE for running traditional banner ads. However, I wonder if this allows these brands to really connect to the active QUBER or AsmallWorld members. It might be a better idea to host a forum or to sponsor a sweepstake competition.nnQUBE,u00a0AsmallWorld andu00a0Elixio are communities whose success from the luxury brand’s point of view depends on how desirable their users are (e.g., willingeness to engage with brand).nMost importantly, without having a supporting social media presence (e.g., blogs, newsletters and NO – a flash presentation will not do, thank you) it is unlikely that such communities can help luxury brands to improve relations with members from within these communities. nnIt seems the examples you have shown are interesting but if they will succeed is still unclear. Most importantly, unless luxury brands brush up on social media skills they will eventually discover that spending money on these communities is not effective.nnRespectfullynUrs @ComMetticsnn

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    Larry, thanks for this comment.nnQUBE,u00a0AsmallWorld andu00a0Elixio (PS. click on names to visit website) are interesting examples ofu00a0u00a0social communities that try to select their members based on certain factors (e.g., income and age). u00a0Although it is not always clear how they decide who to admit and who to reject:nn”Members are invited through the community itself or alternatively can register by emailing qube@quintessentially.com“.nPS: quintessentially – company that owns QUBE – is a Concierge service in the UK with membership fees of u00a3750 – 24,000 per yearnnGilt (click to visit website) is an online store that tries to sell luxury goods at a discount. u00a0However, one cannot purchase some of the most famous brandsu00a0through this channel. u00a0Hence, I am not sure how it relates to using social media more effectively as a luxury brand.nnCartier, Mont Blanc, Aston Martin, Tiffany and others use QUBE for running traditional banner ads. However, I wonder if this allows these brands to really connect to the active QUBER or AsmallWorld members. It might be a better idea to host a forum or to sponsor a sweepstake competition.nnQUBE,u00a0AsmallWorld andu00a0Elixio are communities whose success from the luxury brand’s point of view depends on how desirable their users are (e.g., willingeness to engage with brand).nMost importantly, without having a supporting social media presence (e.g., blogs, newsletters and NO – a flash presentation will not do, thank you) it is unlikely that such communities can help luxury brands to improve relations with members from within these communities. nnIt seems the examples you have shown are interesting but if they will succeed is still unclear. Most importantly, unless luxury brands brush up on social media skills they will eventually discover that spending money on these communities is not effective.nnRespectfullynUrs @ComMetticsnn

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    Larry, thanks for this comment.nnQUBE,u00a0AsmallWorld andu00a0Elixio (PS. click on names to visit website) are interesting examples ofu00a0u00a0social communities that try to select their members based on certain factors (e.g., income and age). u00a0Although it is not always clear how they decide who to admit and who to reject:nn”Members are invited through the community itself or alternatively can register by emailing qube@quintessentially.com“.nPS: quintessentially – company that owns QUBE – is a Concierge service in the UK with membership fees of u00a3750 – 24,000 per yearnnGilt (click to visit website) is an online store that tries to sell luxury goods at a discount. u00a0However, one cannot purchase some of the most famous brandsu00a0through this channel. u00a0Hence, I am not sure how it relates to using social media more effectively as a luxury brand.nnCartier, Mont Blanc, Aston Martin, Tiffany and others use QUBE for running traditional banner ads. However, I wonder if this allows these brands to really connect to the active QUBER or AsmallWorld members. It might be a better idea to host a forum or to sponsor a sweepstake competition.nnQUBE,u00a0AsmallWorld andu00a0Elixio are communities whose success from the luxury brand’s point of view depends on how desirable their users are (e.g., willingeness to engage with brand).nMost importantly, without having a supporting social media presence (e.g., blogs, newsletters and NO – a flash presentation will not do, thank you) it is unlikely that such communities can help luxury brands to improve relations with members from within these communities. nnIt seems the examples you have shown are interesting but if they will succeed is still unclear. Most importantly, unless luxury brands brush up on social media skills they will eventually discover that spending money on these communities is not effective.nnRespectfullynUrs @ComMetticsnn

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    Larry, thanks for this comment.nnQUBE,u00a0AsmallWorld andu00a0Elixio (PS. click on names to visit website) are interesting examples ofu00a0u00a0social communities that try to select their members based on certain factors (e.g., income and age). u00a0Although it is not always clear how they decide who to admit and who to reject:nn”Members are invited through the community itself or alternatively can register by emailing qube@quintessentially.com“.nPS: quintessentially – company that owns QUBE – is a Concierge service in the UK with membership fees of u00a3750 – 24,000 per yearnnGilt (click to visit website) is an online store that tries to sell luxury goods at a discount. u00a0However, one cannot purchase some of the most famous brandsu00a0through this channel. u00a0Hence, I am not sure how it relates to using social media more effectively as a luxury brand.nnCartier, Mont Blanc, Aston Martin, Tiffany and others use QUBE for running traditional banner ads. However, I wonder if this allows these brands to really connect to the active QUBER or AsmallWorld members. It might be a better idea to host a forum or to sponsor a sweepstake competition.nnQUBE,u00a0AsmallWorld andu00a0Elixio are communities whose success from the luxury brand’s point of view depends on how desirable their users are (e.g., willingeness to engage with brand).nMost importantly, without having a supporting social media presence (e.g., blogs, newsletters and NO – a flash presentation will not do, thank you) it is unlikely that such communities can help luxury brands to improve relations with members from within these communities. nnIt seems the examples you have shown are interesting but if they will succeed is still unclear. Most importantly, unless luxury brands brush up on social media skills they will eventually discover that spending money on these communities is not effective.nnRespectfullynUrs @ComMetticsnn

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    Larry, thanks for this comment.nnQUBE,u00a0AsmallWorld andu00a0Elixio (PS. click on names to visit website) are interesting examples ofu00a0u00a0social communities that try to select their members based on certain factors (e.g., income and age). u00a0Although it is not always clear how they decide who to admit and who to reject:nn”Members are invited through the community itself or alternatively can register by emailing qube@quintessentially.com“.nPS: quintessentially – company that owns QUBE – is a Concierge service in the UK with membership fees of u00a3750 – 24,000 per yearnnGilt (click to visit website) is an online store that tries to sell luxury goods at a discount. u00a0However, one cannot purchase some of the most famous brandsu00a0through this channel. u00a0Hence, I am not sure how it relates to using social media more effectively as a luxury brand.nnCartier, Mont Blanc, Aston Martin, Tiffany and others use QUBE for running traditional banner ads. However, I wonder if this allows these brands to really connect to the active QUBER or AsmallWorld members. It might be a better idea to host a forum or to sponsor a sweepstake competition.nnQUBE,u00a0AsmallWorld andu00a0Elixio are communities whose success from the luxury brand’s point of view depends on how desirable their users are (e.g., willingeness to engage with brand).nMost importantly, without having a supporting social media presence (e.g., blogs, newsletters and NO – a flash presentation will not do, thank you) it is unlikely that such communities can help luxury brands to improve relations with members from within these communities. nnIt seems the examples you have shown are interesting but if they will succeed is still unclear. Most importantly, unless luxury brands brush up on social media skills they will eventually discover that spending money on these communities is not effective.nnRespectfullynUrs @ComMetticsnn

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    Larry, thanks for this comment.nnQUBE,u00a0AsmallWorld andu00a0Elixio (PS. click on names to visit website) are interesting examples ofu00a0u00a0social communities that try to select their members based on certain factors (e.g., income and age). u00a0Although it is not always clear how they decide who to admit and who to reject:nn”Members are invited through the community itself or alternatively can register by emailing qube@quintessentially.com“.nPS: quintessentially – company that owns QUBE – is a Concierge service in the UK with membership fees of u00a3750 – 24,000 per yearnnGilt (click to visit website) is an online store that tries to sell luxury goods at a discount. u00a0However, one cannot purchase some of the most famous brandsu00a0through this channel. u00a0Hence, I am not sure how it relates to using social media more effectively as a luxury brand.nnCartier, Mont Blanc, Aston Martin, Tiffany and others use QUBE for running traditional banner ads. However, I wonder if this allows these brands to really connect to the active QUBER or AsmallWorld members. It might be a better idea to host a forum or to sponsor a sweepstake competition.nnQUBE,u00a0AsmallWorld andu00a0Elixio are communities whose success from the luxury brand’s point of view depends on how desirable their users are (e.g., willingeness to engage with brand).nMost importantly, without having a supporting social media presence (e.g., blogs, newsletters and NO – a flash presentation will not do, thank you) it is unlikely that such communities can help luxury brands to improve relations with members from within these communities. nnIt seems the examples you have shown are interesting but if they will succeed is still unclear. Most importantly, unless luxury brands brush up on social media skills they will eventually discover that spending money on these communities is not effective.nnRespectfullynUrs @ComMetticsnn

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    Larry, thanks for this comment.nnQUBE,u00a0AsmallWorld andu00a0Elixio (PS. click on names to visit website) are interesting examples ofu00a0u00a0social communities that try to select their members based on certain factors (e.g., income and age). u00a0Although it is not always clear how they decide who to admit and who to reject:nn”Members are invited through the community itself or alternatively can register by emailing qube@quintessentially.com“.nPS: quintessentially – company that owns QUBE – is a Concierge service in the UK with membership fees of u00a3750 – 24,000 per yearnnGilt (click to visit website) is an online store that tries to sell luxury goods at a discount. u00a0However, one cannot purchase some of the most famous brandsu00a0through this channel. u00a0Hence, I am not sure how it relates to using social media more effectively as a luxury brand.nnCartier, Mont Blanc, Aston Martin, Tiffany and others use QUBE for running traditional banner ads. However, I wonder if this allows these brands to really connect to the active QUBER or AsmallWorld members. It might be a better idea to host a forum or to sponsor a sweepstake competition.nnQUBE,u00a0AsmallWorld andu00a0Elixio are communities whose success from the luxury brand’s point of view depends on how desirable their users are (e.g., willingeness to engage with brand).nMost importantly, without having a supporting social media presence (e.g., blogs, newsletters and NO – a flash presentation will not do, thank you) it is unlikely that such communities can help luxury brands to improve relations with members from within these communities. nnIt seems the examples you have shown are interesting but if they will succeed is still unclear. Most importantly, unless luxury brands brush up on social media skills they will eventually discover that spending money on these communities is not effective.nnRespectfullynUrs @ComMetticsnn

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    Larry, thanks for this comment.nnQUBE,u00a0AsmallWorld andu00a0Elixio (PS. click on names to visit website) are interesting examples ofu00a0u00a0social communities that try to select their members based on certain factors (e.g., income and age). u00a0Although it is not always clear how they decide who to admit and who to reject:nn”Members are invited through the community itself or alternatively can register by emailing qube@quintessentially.com“.nPS: quintessentially – company that owns QUBE – is a Concierge service in the UK with membership fees of u00a3750 – 24,000 per yearnnGilt (click to visit website) is an online store that tries to sell luxury goods at a discount. u00a0However, one cannot purchase some of the most famous brandsu00a0through this channel. u00a0Hence, I am not sure how it relates to using social media more effectively as a luxury brand.nnCartier, Mont Blanc, Aston Martin, Tiffany and others use QUBE for running traditional banner ads. However, I wonder if this allows these brands to really connect to the active QUBER or AsmallWorld members. It might be a better idea to host a forum or to sponsor a sweepstake competition.nnQUBE,u00a0AsmallWorld andu00a0Elixio are communities whose success from the luxury brand’s point of view depends on how desirable their users are (e.g., willingeness to engage with brand).nMost importantly, without having a supporting social media presence (e.g., blogs, newsletters and NO – a flash presentation will not do, thank you) it is unlikely that such communities can help luxury brands to improve relations with members from within these communities. nnIt seems the examples you have shown are interesting but if they will succeed is still unclear. Most importantly, unless luxury brands brush up on social media skills they will eventually discover that spending money on these communities is not effective.nnRespectfullynUrs @ComMetticsnn

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    Larry, thanks for this comment.nnQUBE,u00a0AsmallWorld andu00a0Elixio (PS. click on names to visit website) are interesting examples ofu00a0u00a0social communities that try to select their members based on certain factors (e.g., income and age). u00a0Although it is not always clear how they decide who to admit and who to reject:nn”Members are invited through the community itself or alternatively can register by emailing qube@quintessentially.com“.nPS: quintessentially – company that owns QUBE – is a Concierge service in the UK with membership fees of u00a3750 – 24,000 per yearnnGilt (click to visit website) is an online store that tries to sell luxury goods at a discount. u00a0However, one cannot purchase some of the most famous brandsu00a0through this channel. u00a0Hence, I am not sure how it relates to using social media more effectively as a luxury brand.nnCartier, Mont Blanc, Aston Martin, Tiffany and others use QUBE for running traditional banner ads. However, I wonder if this allows these brands to really connect to the active QUBER or AsmallWorld members. It might be a better idea to host a forum or to sponsor a sweepstake competition.nnQUBE,u00a0AsmallWorld andu00a0Elixio are communities whose success from the luxury brand’s point of view depends on how desirable their users are (e.g., willingeness to engage with brand).nMost importantly, without having a supporting social media presence (e.g., blogs, newsletters and NO – a flash presentation will not do, thank you) it is unlikely that such communities can help luxury brands to improve relations with members from within these communities. nnIt seems the examples you have shown are interesting but if they will succeed is still unclear. Most importantly, unless luxury brands brush up on social media skills they will eventually discover that spending money on these communities is not effective.nnRespectfullynUrs @ComMetticsnn

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    Larry, thanks for this comment.nnQUBE,u00a0AsmallWorld andu00a0Elixio (PS. click on names to visit website) are interesting examples ofu00a0u00a0social communities that try to select their members based on certain factors (e.g., income and age). u00a0Although it is not always clear how they decide who to admit and who to reject:nn”Members are invited through the community itself or alternatively can register by emailing qube@quintessentially.com“.nPS: quintessentially – company that owns QUBE – is a Concierge service in the UK with membership fees of u00a3750 – 24,000 per yearnnGilt (click to visit website) is an online store that tries to sell luxury goods at a discount. u00a0However, one cannot purchase some of the most famous brandsu00a0through this channel. u00a0Hence, I am not sure how it relates to using social media more effectively as a luxury brand.nnCartier, Mont Blanc, Aston Martin, Tiffany and others use QUBE for running traditional banner ads. However, I wonder if this allows these brands to really connect to the active QUBER or AsmallWorld members. It might be a better idea to host a forum or to sponsor a sweepstake competition.nnQUBE,u00a0AsmallWorld andu00a0Elixio are communities whose success from the luxury brand’s point of view depends on how desirable their users are (e.g., willingeness to engage with brand).nMost importantly, without having a supporting social media presence (e.g., blogs, newsletters and NO – a flash presentation will not do, thank you) it is unlikely that such communities can help luxury brands to improve relations with members from within these communities. nnIt seems the examples you have shown are interesting but if they will succeed is still unclear. Most importantly, unless luxury brands brush up on social media skills they will eventually discover that spending money on these communities is not effective.nnRespectfullynUrs @ComMetticsnn

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    Larry, thanks for this comment.nnQUBE,u00a0AsmallWorld andu00a0Elixio (PS. click on names to visit website) are interesting examples ofu00a0u00a0social communities that try to select their members based on certain factors (e.g., income and age). u00a0Although it is not always clear how they decide who to admit and who to reject:nn”Members are invited through the community itself or alternatively can register by emailing qube@quintessentially.com“.nPS: quintessentially – company that owns QUBE – is a Concierge service in the UK with membership fees of u00a3750 – 24,000 per yearnnGilt (click to visit website) is an online store that tries to sell luxury goods at a discount. u00a0However, one cannot purchase some of the most famous brandsu00a0through this channel. u00a0Hence, I am not sure how it relates to using social media more effectively as a luxury brand.nnCartier, Mont Blanc, Aston Martin, Tiffany and others use QUBE for running traditional banner ads. However, I wonder if this allows these brands to really connect to the active QUBER or AsmallWorld members. It might be a better idea to host a forum or to sponsor a sweepstake competition.nnQUBE,u00a0AsmallWorld andu00a0Elixio are communities whose success from the luxury brand’s point of view depends on how desirable their users are (e.g., willingeness to engage with brand).nMost importantly, without having a supporting social media presence (e.g., blogs, newsletters and NO – a flash presentation will not do, thank you) it is unlikely that such communities can help luxury brands to improve relations with members from within these communities. nnIt seems the examples you have shown are interesting but if they will succeed is still unclear. Most importantly, unless luxury brands brush up on social media skills they will eventually discover that spending money on these communities is not effective.nnRespectfullynUrs @ComMetticsnn

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    Larry, thanks for this comment.nnQUBE,u00a0AsmallWorld andu00a0Elixio (PS. click on names to visit website) are interesting examples ofu00a0u00a0social communities that try to select their members based on certain factors (e.g., income and age). u00a0Although it is not always clear how they decide who to admit and who to reject:nn”Members are invited through the community itself or alternatively can register by emailing qube@quintessentially.com“.nPS: quintessentially – company that owns QUBE – is a Concierge service in the UK with membership fees of u00a3750 – 24,000 per yearnnGilt (click to visit website) is an online store that tries to sell luxury goods at a discount. u00a0However, one cannot purchase some of the most famous brandsu00a0through this channel. u00a0Hence, I am not sure how it relates to using social media more effectively as a luxury brand.nnCartier, Mont Blanc, Aston Martin, Tiffany and others use QUBE for running traditional banner ads. However, I wonder if this allows these brands to really connect to the active QUBER or AsmallWorld members. It might be a better idea to host a forum or to sponsor a sweepstake competition.nnQUBE,u00a0AsmallWorld andu00a0Elixio are communities whose success from the luxury brand’s point of view depends on how desirable their users are (e.g., willingeness to engage with brand).nMost importantly, without having a supporting social media presence (e.g., blogs, newsletters and NO – a flash presentation will not do, thank you) it is unlikely that such communities can help luxury brands to improve relations with members from within these communities. nnIt seems the examples you have shown are interesting but if they will succeed is still unclear. Most importantly, unless luxury brands brush up on social media skills they will eventually discover that spending money on these communities is not effective.nnRespectfullynUrs @ComMetticsnn

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    Larry, thanks for this comment.nnQUBE,u00a0AsmallWorld andu00a0Elixio (PS. click on names to visit website) are interesting examples ofu00a0u00a0social communities that try to select their members based on certain factors (e.g., income and age). u00a0Although it is not always clear how they decide who to admit and who to reject:nn”Members are invited through the community itself or alternatively can register by emailing qube@quintessentially.com“.nPS: quintessentially – company that owns QUBE – is a Concierge service in the UK with membership fees of u00a3750 – 24,000 per yearnnGilt (click to visit website) is an online store that tries to sell luxury goods at a discount. u00a0However, one cannot purchase some of the most famous brandsu00a0through this channel. u00a0Hence, I am not sure how it relates to using social media more effectively as a luxury brand.nnCartier, Mont Blanc, Aston Martin, Tiffany and others use QUBE for running traditional banner ads. However, I wonder if this allows these brands to really connect to the active QUBER or AsmallWorld members. It might be a better idea to host a forum or to sponsor a sweepstake competition.nnQUBE,u00a0AsmallWorld andu00a0Elixio are communities whose success from the luxury brand’s point of view depends on how desirable their users are (e.g., willingeness to engage with brand).nMost importantly, without having a supporting social media presence (e.g., blogs, newsletters and NO – a flash presentation will not do, thank you) it is unlikely that such communities can help luxury brands to improve relations with members from within these communities. nnIt seems the examples you have shown are interesting but if they will succeed is still unclear. Most importantly, unless luxury brands brush up on social media skills they will eventually discover that spending money on these communities is not effective.nnRespectfullynUrs @ComMetticsnn

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    Larry, thanks for this comment.nnQUBE,u00a0AsmallWorld andu00a0Elixio (PS. click on names to visit website) are interesting examples ofu00a0u00a0social communities that try to select their members based on certain factors (e.g., income and age). u00a0Although it is not always clear how they decide who to admit and who to reject:nn”Members are invited through the community itself or alternatively can register by emailing qube@quintessentially.com“.nPS: quintessentially – company that owns QUBE – is a Concierge service in the UK with membership fees of u00a3750 – 24,000 per yearnnGilt (click to visit website) is an online store that tries to sell luxury goods at a discount. u00a0However, one cannot purchase some of the most famous brandsu00a0through this channel. u00a0Hence, I am not sure how it relates to using social media more effectively as a luxury brand.nnCartier, Mont Blanc, Aston Martin, Tiffany and others use QUBE for running traditional banner ads. However, I wonder if this allows these brands to really connect to the active QUBER or AsmallWorld members. It might be a better idea to host a forum or to sponsor a sweepstake competition.nnQUBE,u00a0AsmallWorld andu00a0Elixio are communities whose success from the luxury brand’s point of view depends on how desirable their users are (e.g., willingeness to engage with brand).nMost importantly, without having a supporting social media presence (e.g., blogs, newsletters and NO – a flash presentation will not do, thank you) it is unlikely that such communities can help luxury brands to improve relations with members from within these communities. nnIt seems the examples you have shown are interesting but if they will succeed is still unclear. Most importantly, unless luxury brands brush up on social media skills they will eventually discover that spending money on these communities is not effective.nnRespectfullynUrs @ComMetticsnn

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    Larry, thanks for this comment.nnQUBE,u00a0AsmallWorld andu00a0Elixio (PS. click on names to visit website) are interesting examples ofu00a0u00a0social communities that try to select their members based on certain factors (e.g., income and age). u00a0Although it is not always clear how they decide who to admit and who to reject:nn”Members are invited through the community itself or alternatively can register by emailing qube@quintessentially.com“.nPS: quintessentially – company that owns QUBE – is a Concierge service in the UK with membership fees of u00a3750 – 24,000 per yearnnGilt (click to visit website) is an online store that tries to sell luxury goods at a discount. u00a0However, one cannot purchase some of the most famous brandsu00a0through this channel. u00a0Hence, I am not sure how it relates to using social media more effectively as a luxury brand.nnCartier, Mont Blanc, Aston Martin, Tiffany and others use QUBE for running traditional banner ads. However, I wonder if this allows these brands to really connect to the active QUBER or AsmallWorld members. It might be a better idea to host a forum or to sponsor a sweepstake competition.nnQUBE,u00a0AsmallWorld andu00a0Elixio are communities whose success from the luxury brand’s point of view depends on how desirable their users are (e.g., willingeness to engage with brand).nMost importantly, without having a supporting social media presence (e.g., blogs, newsletters and NO – a flash presentation will not do, thank you) it is unlikely that such communities can help luxury brands to improve relations with members from within these communities. nnIt seems the examples you have shown are interesting but if they will succeed is still unclear. Most importantly, unless luxury brands brush up on social media skills they will eventually discover that spending money on these communities is not effective.nnRespectfullynUrs @ComMetticsnn

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    Larry, thanks for this comment.nnQUBE,u00a0AsmallWorld andu00a0Elixio (PS. click on names to visit website) are interesting examples ofu00a0u00a0social communities that try to select their members based on certain factors (e.g., income and age). u00a0Although it is not always clear how they decide who to admit and who to reject:nn”Members are invited through the community itself or alternatively can register by emailing qube@quintessentially.com“.nPS: quintessentially – company that owns QUBE – is a Concierge service in the UK with membership fees of u00a3750 – 24,000 per yearnnGilt (click to visit website) is an online store that tries to sell luxury goods at a discount. u00a0However, one cannot purchase some of the most famous brandsu00a0through this channel. u00a0Hence, I am not sure how it relates to using social media more effectively as a luxury brand.nnCartier, Mont Blanc, Aston Martin, Tiffany and others use QUBE for running traditional banner ads. However, I wonder if this allows these brands to really connect to the active QUBER or AsmallWorld members. It might be a better idea to host a forum or to sponsor a sweepstake competition.nnQUBE,u00a0AsmallWorld andu00a0Elixio are communities whose success from the luxury brand’s point of view depends on how desirable their users are (e.g., willingeness to engage with brand).nMost importantly, without having a supporting social media presence (e.g., blogs, newsletters and NO – a flash presentation will not do, thank you) it is unlikely that such communities can help luxury brands to improve relations with members from within these communities. nnIt seems the examples you have shown are interesting but if they will succeed is still unclear. Most importantly, unless luxury brands brush up on social media skills they will eventually discover that spending money on these communities is not effective.nnRespectfullynUrs @ComMetticsnn

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    Larry, thanks for this comment.nnQUBE,u00a0AsmallWorld andu00a0Elixio (PS. click on names to visit website) are interesting examples ofu00a0u00a0social communities that try to select their members based on certain factors (e.g., income and age). u00a0Although it is not always clear how they decide who to admit and who to reject:nn”Members are invited through the community itself or alternatively can register by emailing qube@quintessentially.com“.nPS: quintessentially – company that owns QUBE – is a Concierge service in the UK with membership fees of u00a3750 – 24,000 per yearnnGilt (click to visit website) is an online store that tries to sell luxury goods at a discount. u00a0However, one cannot purchase some of the most famous brandsu00a0through this channel. u00a0Hence, I am not sure how it relates to using social media more effectively as a luxury brand.nnCartier, Mont Blanc, Aston Martin, Tiffany and others use QUBE for running traditional banner ads. However, I wonder if this allows these brands to really connect to the active QUBER or AsmallWorld members. It might be a better idea to host a forum or to sponsor a sweepstake competition.nnQUBE,u00a0AsmallWorld andu00a0Elixio are communities whose success from the luxury brand’s point of view depends on how desirable their users are (e.g., willingeness to engage with brand).nMost importantly, without having a supporting social media presence (e.g., blogs, newsletters and NO – a flash presentation will not do, thank you) it is unlikely that such communities can help luxury brands to improve relations with members from within these communities. nnIt seems the examples you have shown are interesting but if they will succeed is still unclear. Most importantly, unless luxury brands brush up on social media skills they will eventually discover that spending money on these communities is not effective.nnRespectfullynUrs @ComMetticsnn

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    Larry, thanks for this comment.nnQUBE,u00a0AsmallWorld andu00a0Elixio (PS. click on names to visit website) are interesting examples ofu00a0u00a0social communities that try to select their members based on certain factors (e.g., income and age). u00a0Although it is not always clear how they decide who to admit and who to reject:nn”Members are invited through the community itself or alternatively can register by emailing qube@quintessentially.com“.nPS: quintessentially – company that owns QUBE – is a Concierge service in the UK with membership fees of u00a3750 – 24,000 per yearnnGilt (click to visit website) is an online store that tries to sell luxury goods at a discount. u00a0However, one cannot purchase some of the most famous brandsu00a0through this channel. u00a0Hence, I am not sure how it relates to using social media more effectively as a luxury brand.nnCartier, Mont Blanc, Aston Martin, Tiffany and others use QUBE for running traditional banner ads. However, I wonder if this allows these brands to really connect to the active QUBER or AsmallWorld members. It might be a better idea to host a forum or to sponsor a sweepstake competition.nnQUBE,u00a0AsmallWorld andu00a0Elixio are communities whose success from the luxury brand’s point of view depends on how desirable their users are (e.g., willingeness to engage with brand).nMost importantly, without having a supporting social media presence (e.g., blogs, newsletters and NO – a flash presentation will not do, thank you) it is unlikely that such communities can help luxury brands to improve relations with members from within these communities. nnIt seems the examples you have shown are interesting but if they will succeed is still unclear. Most importantly, unless luxury brands brush up on social media skills they will eventually discover that spending money on these communities is not effective.nnRespectfullynUrs @ComMetticsnn

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    Larry, thanks for this comment.nnQUBE,u00a0AsmallWorld andu00a0Elixio (PS. click on names to visit website) are interesting examples ofu00a0u00a0social communities that try to select their members based on certain factors (e.g., income and age). u00a0Although it is not always clear how they decide who to admit and who to reject:nn”Members are invited through the community itself or alternatively can register by emailing qube@quintessentially.com“.nPS: quintessentially – company that owns QUBE – is a Concierge service in the UK with membership fees of u00a3750 – 24,000 per yearnnGilt (click to visit website) is an online store that tries to sell luxury goods at a discount. u00a0However, one cannot purchase some of the most famous brandsu00a0through this channel. u00a0Hence, I am not sure how it relates to using social media more effectively as a luxury brand.nnCartier, Mont Blanc, Aston Martin, Tiffany and others use QUBE for running traditional banner ads. However, I wonder if this allows these brands to really connect to the active QUBER or AsmallWorld members. It might be a better idea to host a forum or to sponsor a sweepstake competition.nnQUBE,u00a0AsmallWorld andu00a0Elixio are communities whose success from the luxury brand’s point of view depends on how desirable their users are (e.g., willingeness to engage with brand).nMost importantly, without having a supporting social media presence (e.g., blogs, newsletters and NO – a flash presentation will not do, thank you) it is unlikely that such communities can help luxury brands to improve relations with members from within these communities. nnIt seems the examples you have shown are interesting but if they will succeed is still unclear. Most importantly, unless luxury brands brush up on social media skills they will eventually discover that spending money on these communities is not effective.nnRespectfullynUrs @ComMetticsnn

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    Larry, thanks for this comment.nnQUBE,u00a0AsmallWorld andu00a0Elixio (PS. click on names to visit website) are interesting examples ofu00a0u00a0social communities that try to select their members based on certain factors (e.g., income and age). u00a0Although it is not always clear how they decide who to admit and who to reject:nn”Members are invited through the community itself or alternatively can register by emailing qube@quintessentially.com“.nPS: quintessentially – company that owns QUBE – is a Concierge service in the UK with membership fees of u00a3750 – 24,000 per yearnnGilt (click to visit website) is an online store that tries to sell luxury goods at a discount. u00a0However, one cannot purchase some of the most famous brandsu00a0through this channel. u00a0Hence, I am not sure how it relates to using social media more effectively as a luxury brand.nnCartier, Mont Blanc, Aston Martin, Tiffany and others use QUBE for running traditional banner ads. However, I wonder if this allows these brands to really connect to the active QUBER or AsmallWorld members. It might be a better idea to host a forum or to sponsor a sweepstake competition.nnQUBE,u00a0AsmallWorld andu00a0Elixio are communities whose success from the luxury brand’s point of view depends on how desirable their users are (e.g., willingeness to engage with brand).nMost importantly, without having a supporting social media presence (e.g., blogs, newsletters and NO – a flash presentation will not do, thank you) it is unlikely that such communities can help luxury brands to improve relations with members from within these communities. nnIt seems the examples you have shown are interesting but if they will succeed is still unclear. Most importantly, unless luxury brands brush up on social media skills they will eventually discover that spending money on these communities is not effective.nnRespectfullynUrs @ComMetticsnn

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    Larry, thanks for this comment.nnQUBE,u00a0AsmallWorld andu00a0Elixio (PS. click on names to visit website) are interesting examples ofu00a0u00a0social communities that try to select their members based on certain factors (e.g., income and age). u00a0Although it is not always clear how they decide who to admit and who to reject:nn”Members are invited through the community itself or alternatively can register by emailing qube@quintessentially.com“.nPS: quintessentially – company that owns QUBE – is a Concierge service in the UK with membership fees of u00a3750 – 24,000 per yearnnGilt (click to visit website) is an online store that tries to sell luxury goods at a discount. u00a0However, one cannot purchase some of the most famous brandsu00a0through this channel. u00a0Hence, I am not sure how it relates to using social media more effectively as a luxury brand.nnCartier, Mont Blanc, Aston Martin, Tiffany and others use QUBE for running traditional banner ads. However, I wonder if this allows these brands to really connect to the active QUBER or AsmallWorld members. It might be a better idea to host a forum or to sponsor a sweepstake competition.nnQUBE,u00a0AsmallWorld andu00a0Elixio are communities whose success from the luxury brand’s point of view depends on how desirable their users are (e.g., willingeness to engage with brand).nMost importantly, without having a supporting social media presence (e.g., blogs, newsletters and NO – a flash presentation will not do, thank you) it is unlikely that such communities can help luxury brands to improve relations with members from within these communities. nnIt seems the examples you have shown are interesting but if they will succeed is still unclear. Most importantly, unless luxury brands brush up on social media skills they will eventually discover that spending money on these communities is not effective.nnRespectfullynUrs @ComMetticsnn

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    Larry, thanks for this comment.nnQUBE,u00a0AsmallWorld andu00a0Elixio (PS. click on names to visit website) are interesting examples ofu00a0u00a0social communities that try to select their members based on certain factors (e.g., income and age). u00a0Although it is not always clear how they decide who to admit and who to reject:nn”Members are invited through the community itself or alternatively can register by emailing qube@quintessentially.com“.nPS: quintessentially – company that owns QUBE – is a Concierge service in the UK with membership fees of u00a3750 – 24,000 per yearnnGilt (click to visit website) is an online store that tries to sell luxury goods at a discount. u00a0However, one cannot purchase some of the most famous brandsu00a0through this channel. u00a0Hence, I am not sure how it relates to using social media more effectively as a luxury brand.nnCartier, Mont Blanc, Aston Martin, Tiffany and others use QUBE for running traditional banner ads. However, I wonder if this allows these brands to really connect to the active QUBER or AsmallWorld members. It might be a better idea to host a forum or to sponsor a sweepstake competition.nnQUBE,u00a0AsmallWorld andu00a0Elixio are communities whose success from the luxury brand’s point of view depends on how desirable their users are (e.g., willingeness to engage with brand).nMost importantly, without having a supporting social media presence (e.g., blogs, newsletters and NO – a flash presentation will not do, thank you) it is unlikely that such communities can help luxury brands to improve relations with members from within these communities. nnIt seems the examples you have shown are interesting but if they will succeed is still unclear. Most importantly, unless luxury brands brush up on social media skills they will eventually discover that spending money on these communities is not effective.nnRespectfullynUrs @ComMetticsnn

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    Larry, thanks for this comment.nnQUBE,u00a0AsmallWorld andu00a0Elixio (PS. click on names to visit website) are interesting examples ofu00a0u00a0social communities that try to select their members based on certain factors (e.g., income and age). u00a0Although it is not always clear how they decide who to admit and who to reject:nn”Members are invited through the community itself or alternatively can register by emailing qube@quintessentially.com“.nPS: quintessentially – company that owns QUBE – is a Concierge service in the UK with membership fees of u00a3750 – 24,000 per yearnnGilt (click to visit website) is an online store that tries to sell luxury goods at a discount. u00a0However, one cannot purchase some of the most famous brandsu00a0through this channel. u00a0Hence, I am not sure how it relates to using social media more effectively as a luxury brand.nnCartier, Mont Blanc, Aston Martin, Tiffany and others use QUBE for running traditional banner ads. However, I wonder if this allows these brands to really connect to the active QUBER or AsmallWorld members. It might be a better idea to host a forum or to sponsor a sweepstake competition.nnQUBE,u00a0AsmallWorld andu00a0Elixio are communities whose success from the luxury brand’s point of view depends on how desirable their users are (e.g., willingeness to engage with brand).nMost importantly, without having a supporting social media presence (e.g., blogs, newsletters and NO – a flash presentation will not do, thank you) it is unlikely that such communities can help luxury brands to improve relations with members from within these communities. nnIt seems the examples you have shown are interesting but if they will succeed is still unclear. Most importantly, unless luxury brands brush up on social media skills they will eventually discover that spending money on these communities is not effective.nnRespectfullynUrs @ComMetticsnn

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    Larry, thanks for this comment.nnQUBE,u00a0AsmallWorld andu00a0Elixio (PS. click on names to visit website) are interesting examples ofu00a0u00a0social communities that try to select their members based on certain factors (e.g., income and age). u00a0Although it is not always clear how they decide who to admit and who to reject:nn”Members are invited through the community itself or alternatively can register by emailing qube@quintessentially.com“.nPS: quintessentially – company that owns QUBE – is a Concierge service in the UK with membership fees of u00a3750 – 24,000 per yearnnGilt (click to visit website) is an online store that tries to sell luxury goods at a discount. u00a0However, one cannot purchase some of the most famous brandsu00a0through this channel. u00a0Hence, I am not sure how it relates to using social media more effectively as a luxury brand.nnCartier, Mont Blanc, Aston Martin, Tiffany and others use QUBE for running traditional banner ads. However, I wonder if this allows these brands to really connect to the active QUBER or AsmallWorld members. It might be a better idea to host a forum or to sponsor a sweepstake competition.nnQUBE,u00a0AsmallWorld andu00a0Elixio are communities whose success from the luxury brand’s point of view depends on how desirable their users are (e.g., willingeness to engage with brand).nMost importantly, without having a supporting social media presence (e.g., blogs, newsletters and NO – a flash presentation will not do, thank you) it is unlikely that such communities can help luxury brands to improve relations with members from within these communities. nnIt seems the examples you have shown are interesting but if they will succeed is still unclear. Most importantly, unless luxury brands brush up on social media skills they will eventually discover that spending money on these communities is not effective.nnRespectfullynUrs @ComMetticsnn

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    Larry, thanks for this comment.nnQUBE,u00a0AsmallWorld andu00a0Elixio (PS. click on names to visit website) are interesting examples ofu00a0u00a0social communities that try to select their members based on certain factors (e.g., income and age). u00a0Although it is not always clear how they decide who to admit and who to reject:nn”Members are invited through the community itself or alternatively can register by emailing qube@quintessentially.com“.nPS: quintessentially – company that owns QUBE – is a Concierge service in the UK with membership fees of u00a3750 – 24,000 per yearnnGilt (click to visit website) is an online store that tries to sell luxury goods at a discount. u00a0However, one cannot purchase some of the most famous brandsu00a0through this channel. u00a0Hence, I am not sure how it relates to using social media more effectively as a luxury brand.nnCartier, Mont Blanc, Aston Martin, Tiffany and others use QUBE for running traditional banner ads. However, I wonder if this allows these brands to really connect to the active QUBER or AsmallWorld members. It might be a better idea to host a forum or to sponsor a sweepstake competition.nnQUBE,u00a0AsmallWorld andu00a0Elixio are communities whose success from the luxury brand’s point of view depends on how desirable their users are (e.g., willingeness to engage with brand).nMost importantly, without having a supporting social media presence (e.g., blogs, newsletters and NO – a flash presentation will not do, thank you) it is unlikely that such communities can help luxury brands to improve relations with members from within these communities. nnIt seems the examples you have shown are interesting but if they will succeed is still unclear. Most importantly, unless luxury brands brush up on social media skills they will eventually discover that spending money on these communities is not effective.nnRespectfullynUrs @ComMetticsnn

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    Larry, thanks for this comment.nnQUBE,u00a0AsmallWorld andu00a0Elixio (PS. click on names to visit website) are interesting examples ofu00a0u00a0social communities that try to select their members based on certain factors (e.g., income and age). u00a0Although it is not always clear how they decide who to admit and who to reject:nn”Members are invited through the community itself or alternatively can register by emailing qube@quintessentially.com“.nPS: quintessentially – company that owns QUBE – is a Concierge service in the UK with membership fees of u00a3750 – 24,000 per yearnnGilt (click to visit website) is an online store that tries to sell luxury goods at a discount. u00a0However, one cannot purchase some of the most famous brandsu00a0through this channel. u00a0Hence, I am not sure how it relates to using social media more effectively as a luxury brand.nnCartier, Mont Blanc, Aston Martin, Tiffany and others use QUBE for running traditional banner ads. However, I wonder if this allows these brands to really connect to the active QUBER or AsmallWorld members. It might be a better idea to host a forum or to sponsor a sweepstake competition.nnQUBE,u00a0AsmallWorld andu00a0Elixio are communities whose success from the luxury brand’s point of view depends on how desirable their users are (e.g., willingeness to engage with brand).nMost importantly, without having a supporting social media presence (e.g., blogs, newsletters and NO – a flash presentation will not do, thank you) it is unlikely that such communities can help luxury brands to improve relations with members from within these communities. nnIt seems the examples you have shown are interesting but if they will succeed is still unclear. Most importantly, unless luxury brands brush up on social media skills they will eventually discover that spending money on these communities is not effective.nnRespectfullynUrs @ComMetticsnn

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    Larry, thanks for this comment.nnQUBE,u00a0AsmallWorld andu00a0Elixio (PS. click on names to visit website) are interesting examples ofu00a0u00a0social communities that try to select their members based on certain factors (e.g., income and age). u00a0Although it is not always clear how they decide who to admit and who to reject:nn”Members are invited through the community itself or alternatively can register by emailing qube@quintessentially.com“.nPS: quintessentially – company that owns QUBE – is a Concierge service in the UK with membership fees of u00a3750 – 24,000 per yearnnGilt (click to visit website) is an online store that tries to sell luxury goods at a discount. u00a0However, one cannot purchase some of the most famous brandsu00a0through this channel. u00a0Hence, I am not sure how it relates to using social media more effectively as a luxury brand.nnCartier, Mont Blanc, Aston Martin, Tiffany and others use QUBE for running traditional banner ads. However, I wonder if this allows these brands to really connect to the active QUBER or AsmallWorld members. It might be a better idea to host a forum or to sponsor a sweepstake competition.nnQUBE,u00a0AsmallWorld andu00a0Elixio are communities whose success from the luxury brand’s point of view depends on how desirable their users are (e.g., willingeness to engage with brand).nMost importantly, without having a supporting social media presence (e.g., blogs, newsletters and NO – a flash presentation will not do, thank you) it is unlikely that such communities can help luxury brands to improve relations with members from within these communities. nnIt seems the examples you have shown are interesting but if they will succeed is still unclear. Most importantly, unless luxury brands brush up on social media skills they will eventually discover that spending money on these communities is not effective.nnRespectfullynUrs @ComMetticsnn

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    Larry, thanks for this comment.nnQUBE,u00a0AsmallWorld andu00a0Elixio (PS. click on names to visit website) are interesting examples ofu00a0u00a0social communities that try to select their members based on certain factors (e.g., income and age). u00a0Although it is not always clear how they decide who to admit and who to reject:nn”Members are invited through the community itself or alternatively can register by emailing qube@quintessentially.com“.nPS: quintessentially – company that owns QUBE – is a Concierge service in the UK with membership fees of u00a3750 – 24,000 per yearnnGilt (click to visit website) is an online store that tries to sell luxury goods at a discount. u00a0However, one cannot purchase some of the most famous brandsu00a0through this channel. u00a0Hence, I am not sure how it relates to using social media more effectively as a luxury brand.nnCartier, Mont Blanc, Aston Martin, Tiffany and others use QUBE for running traditional banner ads. However, I wonder if this allows these brands to really connect to the active QUBER or AsmallWorld members. It might be a better idea to host a forum or to sponsor a sweepstake competition.nnQUBE,u00a0AsmallWorld andu00a0Elixio are communities whose success from the luxury brand’s point of view depends on how desirable their users are (e.g., willingeness to engage with brand).nMost importantly, without having a supporting social media presence (e.g., blogs, newsletters and NO – a flash presentation will not do, thank you) it is unlikely that such communities can help luxury brands to improve relations with members from within these communities. nnIt seems the examples you have shown are interesting but if they will succeed is still unclear. Most importantly, unless luxury brands brush up on social media skills they will eventually discover that spending money on these communities is not effective.nnRespectfullynUrs @ComMetticsnn

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    Larry, thanks for this comment.nnQUBE,u00a0AsmallWorld andu00a0Elixio (PS. click on names to visit website) are interesting examples ofu00a0u00a0social communities that try to select their members based on certain factors (e.g., income and age). u00a0Although it is not always clear how they decide who to admit and who to reject:nn”Members are invited through the community itself or alternatively can register by emailing qube@quintessentially.com“.nPS: quintessentially – company that owns QUBE – is a Concierge service in the UK with membership fees of u00a3750 – 24,000 per yearnnGilt (click to visit website) is an online store that tries to sell luxury goods at a discount. u00a0However, one cannot purchase some of the most famous brandsu00a0through this channel. u00a0Hence, I am not sure how it relates to using social media more effectively as a luxury brand.nnCartier, Mont Blanc, Aston Martin, Tiffany and others use QUBE for running traditional banner ads. However, I wonder if this allows these brands to really connect to the active QUBER or AsmallWorld members. It might be a better idea to host a forum or to sponsor a sweepstake competition.nnQUBE,u00a0AsmallWorld andu00a0Elixio are communities whose success from the luxury brand’s point of view depends on how desirable their users are (e.g., willingeness to engage with brand).nMost importantly, without having a supporting social media presence (e.g., blogs, newsletters and NO – a flash presentation will not do, thank you) it is unlikely that such communities can help luxury brands to improve relations with members from within these communities. nnIt seems the examples you have shown are interesting but if they will succeed is still unclear. Most importantly, unless luxury brands brush up on social media skills they will eventually discover that spending money on these communities is not effective.nnRespectfullynUrs @ComMetticsnn

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    Larry, thanks for this comment.nnQUBE,u00a0AsmallWorld andu00a0Elixio (PS. click on names to visit website) are interesting examples ofu00a0u00a0social communities that try to select their members based on certain factors (e.g., income and age). u00a0Although it is not always clear how they decide who to admit and who to reject:nn”Members are invited through the community itself or alternatively can register by emailing qube@quintessentially.com“.nPS: quintessentially – company that owns QUBE – is a Concierge service in the UK with membership fees of u00a3750 – 24,000 per yearnnGilt (click to visit website) is an online store that tries to sell luxury goods at a discount. u00a0However, one cannot purchase some of the most famous brandsu00a0through this channel. u00a0Hence, I am not sure how it relates to using social media more effectively as a luxury brand.nnCartier, Mont Blanc, Aston Martin, Tiffany and others use QUBE for running traditional banner ads. However, I wonder if this allows these brands to really connect to the active QUBER or AsmallWorld members. It might be a better idea to host a forum or to sponsor a sweepstake competition.nnQUBE,u00a0AsmallWorld andu00a0Elixio are communities whose success from the luxury brand’s point of view depends on how desirable their users are (e.g., willingeness to engage with brand).nMost importantly, without having a supporting social media presence (e.g., blogs, newsletters and NO – a flash presentation will not do, thank you) it is unlikely that such communities can help luxury brands to improve relations with members from within these communities. nnIt seems the examples you have shown are interesting but if they will succeed is still unclear. Most importantly, unless luxury brands brush up on social media skills they will eventually discover that spending money on these communities is not effective.nnRespectfullynUrs @ComMetticsnn

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    Larry, thanks for this comment.nnQUBE,u00a0AsmallWorld andu00a0Elixio (PS. click on names to visit website) are interesting examples ofu00a0u00a0social communities that try to select their members based on certain factors (e.g., income and age). u00a0Although it is not always clear how they decide who to admit and who to reject:nn”Members are invited through the community itself or alternatively can register by emailing qube@quintessentially.com“.nPS: quintessentially – company that owns QUBE – is a Concierge service in the UK with membership fees of u00a3750 – 24,000 per yearnnGilt (click to visit website) is an online store that tries to sell luxury goods at a discount. u00a0However, one cannot purchase some of the most famous brandsu00a0through this channel. u00a0Hence, I am not sure how it relates to using social media more effectively as a luxury brand.nnCartier, Mont Blanc, Aston Martin, Tiffany and others use QUBE for running traditional banner ads. However, I wonder if this allows these brands to really connect to the active QUBER or AsmallWorld members. It might be a better idea to host a forum or to sponsor a sweepstake competition.nnQUBE,u00a0AsmallWorld andu00a0Elixio are communities whose success from the luxury brand’s point of view depends on how desirable their users are (e.g., willingeness to engage with brand).nMost importantly, without having a supporting social media presence (e.g., blogs, newsletters and NO – a flash presentation will not do, thank you) it is unlikely that such communities can help luxury brands to improve relations with members from within these communities. nnIt seems the examples you have shown are interesting but if they will succeed is still unclear. Most importantly, unless luxury brands brush up on social media skills they will eventually discover that spending money on these communities is not effective.nnRespectfullynUrs @ComMetticsnn

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  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    Larry, thanks for this comment.

    QUBEAsmallWorld and Elixio (PS. click on names to visit website) are interesting examples of  social communities that try to select their members based on certain factors (e.g., income and age).  Although it is not always clear how they decide who to admit and who to reject:

    “Members are invited through the community itself or alternatively can register by emailing qube@quintessentially.com“.
    PS: quintessentially – company that owns QUBE – is a Concierge service in the UK with membership fees of £750 – 24,000 per year

    Gilt (click to visit website) is an online store that tries to sell luxury goods at a discount.  However, one cannot purchase some of the most famous brands through this channel.  Hence, I am not sure how it relates to using social media more effectively as a luxury brand.

    Cartier, Mont Blanc, Aston Martin, Tiffany and others use QUBE for running traditional banner ads. However, I wonder if this allows these brands to really connect to the active QUBER or AsmallWorld members. It might be a better idea to host a forum or to sponsor a sweepstake competition.

    QUBEAsmallWorld and Elixio are communities whose success from the luxury brand's point of view depends on how desirable their users are (e.g., willingeness to engage with brand).
    Most importantly, without having a supporting social media presence (e.g., blogs, newsletters and NO – a flash presentation will not do, thank you) it is unlikely that such communities can help luxury brands to improve relations with members from within these communities.

    It seems the examples you have shown are interesting but if they will succeed is still unclear. Most importantly, unless luxury brands brush up on social media skills they will eventually discover that spending money on these communities is not effective.

    Respectfully
    Urs @ComMettics

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  • http://twitter.com/nolimitid/status/79475135467372545 NoLimit Indonesia

    Siapa bilang social media tidak efektif untuk luxury brand? > http://commetrics.com/articles/engaging-for-reaching-30-year-olds-a-must/

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