2010 trends: Data and mobile communication

by Urs E. Gattiker on 2009/11/05 · 59 comments 14,993 views

in d business ethics

Image - the jewelry you always wanted but could never find is hereWhen it comes to data services, social networks, cloud computing, mobile and music, market concentration is constantly on the rise. Could this mean the burst of another bubble, once again requiring taxpayers to foot the bill?

Below, we discuss this from a Web 2.0 perspective. In the meantime, to keep up with our latest posts, why not just enter your email below to get the information first?

2010 will bring more players: Defend your turf!
Once upon a time, Nokia released a mobile phone that was basically re-sold by various operators in numerous countries and any subscriber revenue stayed with the operatorApple’s iPhone revenue sharing deal has changed all that.

Image - Google's Android attempts to take a bite out of AppleGoogle’s mobile operating system Android is also challenging Apple’s dominance. With this, Google is attempting to make sure that consumers continue to use its search function from their mobiles.

THE BATTLE IS ON: Who owns the customer?
The one that ‘owns’ the customer can provide mobile data transfer, services and devices as well as data storage, music files and so forth. The giants are moving into each others markets and the fight for survival is on.

Image - European mobile revenue trendsFor instance, mobile operators like Spain’s Telefonica need to protect their healthy revenue growth in the mobile internet use business (see image at right).

Given the above, mobile phone providers certainly did not appreciate the Apple revenue sharing deal they had to submit to.

Nor are retailers and booksellers smiling about Amazon and Wal-Mart stealing away market share by sometimes selling at deep discounts just to gain market share in countries they operate in.

2010 will bring more customer rights and choice: Really?
Google has leveraged computing in the cloud by offering ever more services for ‘free’. Amazon is riding the increasing demand for e-readers as bibliophiles around the globe turn to digital books.

Image - mid July 2009 - Amazon remotely deleted eBook copies of _1984_ from Kindle readers, a PR fiasco _par excellence_But market dominance can result in consumer rights being violated. For instance, Amazon erased copies of a book title from its clients’ Kindle device in July 2009 (think YOU own the data – think again).

Take-aways: 4 ways to prepare for the inevitable data bust

    1. Oligopolies are a bad idea – as the credit card market has demonstrated, having a few players only increases the costs for end-users. Therefore, a wider choice of online booksellers beyond Wal-Mart or Amazon is in the best interest of consumers.
    2. Systemic risk increases as a small group of companies become too big to fail – remember the 2008/2009 financial crisis… the case of too big to fail seems to repeat itself in the Web 2.0 world, or can we afford to let Google shut off its servers?
    3. Dependability and availability of data are threatened – what happens if a company goes bankrupt or your data have been erased? What impact will this have on a country or economy if the cloud computing infrastructure is out of order for a few hours or a day? Regulators need to get onto this act quickly, because companies and consumers cannot manage this risk alone.
    4. Data protection and privacy laws – with cloud computing, nobody knows exactly where data are stored anymore and which national laws apply. Neither the EU nor the US have negotiated an agreement on this issue with such important outsourcing countries as India. If regulators continue to fail to see the writing on the wall in 2010 as the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) did in 2006 regarding financial markets in the US, a real data disaster is just waiting to happen.

More resources about cloud computing, power shifts in mobile data usage, and more:

Bottom line
With only a few large players, the systemic risk of a crisis increases. Sometime, somewhere this data-bubble-in-a-cloud will bust, leaving us to pick the pieces. Accordingly, if we want to avoid having to turn off the power on server farms or paying for another government bailout involving digital data and cloud computing, we must take action in 2010.

This unraveling may not occur for some time, as easy money and excessive global liquidity will push the value or share prices of these corporations for a while. But the longer we wait to grab the bull by the horns and deal with it, the bigger the fall-out will be from possible digital data losses that will be huge and extremely costly.

Your turn. Are you ready and is your company compliant regarding cloud computing? Do you worry about your rights regarding your e-reader or your cloud-stored data? We look forward to your comments, insights AND opinions on this issue.

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  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    2010-01-15- #TRENDWATCH Panasonic gives largest cloud computing contract to date to run a web-based e-mail system for its 380,000-strong workforce to IBM

    IBM trails rivals Amazon.com, Google, Microsoft and Salesforce.com in developing cloud computing products..

    Sales of cloud-based applications, including e-mail programs, will soar 47% in 2010 to about $10bn = see also:

    Apple, Google and China: What you should know

    PS. Cloud computing refers to the fast-frowing field of delivery of software and other services from remote data centers of the internet.

  • Pingback: digital_dale

  • http://twitter.com/opolismail opolis secure mail

    I also wanted to make you aware of opolis secure mail (http://www.opolis.eu).

    Next to social communication you will also spot an increasing demand for secure, encrypted email and document messaging.

    Opolis serves this market and it is for free. Naturally, it has other features as well such as:

    – the sender decides what the recipíent is allowed to do with a mail …
    – one can monitor how a message was further processed.
    – etc.

    Thanks

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    @opolismail

    Appreciate your comment on 2010 trends – mobile communication. But these days I am a bit less worried about e-mails that we are required to back up anyway to be able to produce them in case the court goes through an e-discovery process with us.

    This week, smartphone security risks are something I worry the most about.

    For instance, Wednesday (2010-08-04) the EU Commission announced that it does not allow its 32,000 employees to use a Blackberry because of security concerns.
    Nevertheless, the Commission has nothing against smartphones from Apple or HTC

    This is suprising since Apple iPhone just had another exploit in the wild reported this week. Late last year already (i.e.2009-11-19), Germany’s Ministry of the Interior urged other gov. departments and agencies neither to use smartphones from RIM (Blackberry) nor Apple’s iPhone due to security risks.

    This week (2010-08-04) it was made public that the current iOS 4.0.1 has an exploit in the wild that makes the iPod, iPhone, iPad all vulnerable to malicious PDF files.

    So while I believe secure e-mail is definitely a good thing, my concern is more about the many smartphones getting left behind in taxis and possibly getting into the wrong hands. As well, workers tweeting or e-mailing on their private smartphones and their toys being hacked should worry risk managers.

    I found particularly interesting the statement that the Opolis user sending an e-mail to another party:

    “… decides whether the recipient may copy, print, respond to or forward a message.”

    The above is interesting but everything can be copied if need be we do it the archaic way by just re-typing the text :-)

    As well, by backing up the information as the company is required by law it can still be part of the e-discovery process initiated by a court of law. u00a0All information is fully discoverable and the first place lawyers look when building a case.

    Hence, if you don’t want e-mail to be used the wrong u00a0way by the recipient, the best choice seems to neither send the information by e-mail nor using Twitter, that simple.

    Thanks for sharing and hope to get your next comment soon.

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    @opolismail

    Appreciate your comment on 2010 trends – mobile communication. But these days I am a bit less worried about e-mails that we are required to back up anyway to be able to produce them in case the court goes through an e-discovery process with us.

    This week, smartphone security risks are something I worry the most about.

    For instance, Wednesday (2010-08-04) the EU Commission announced that it does not allow its 32,000 employees to use a Blackberry because of security concerns.
    Nevertheless, the Commission has nothing against smartphones from Apple or HTC

    This is suprising since Apple iPhone just had another exploit in the wild reported this week. Late last year already (i.e.2009-11-19), Germany’s Ministry of the Interior urged other gov. departments and agencies neither to use smartphones from RIM (Blackberry) nor Apple’s iPhone due to security risks.

    This week (2010-08-04) it was made public that the current iOS 4.0.1 has an exploit in the wild that makes the iPod, iPhone, iPad all vulnerable to malicious PDF files.

    So while I believe secure e-mail is definitely a good thing, my concern is more about the many smartphones getting left behind in taxis and possibly getting into the wrong hands. As well, workers tweeting or e-mailing on their private smartphones and their toys being hacked should worry risk managers.

    I found particularly interesting the statement that the Opolis user sending an e-mail to another party:

    “… decides whether the recipient may copy, print, respond to or forward a message.”

    The above is interesting but everything can be copied if need be we do it the archaic way by just re-typing the text :-)

    As well, by backing up the information as the company is required by law it can still be part of the e-discovery process initiated by a court of law. u00a0All information is fully discoverable and the first place lawyers look when building a case.

    Hence, if you don’t want e-mail to be used the wrong u00a0way by the recipient, the best choice seems to neither send the information by e-mail nor using Twitter, that simple.

    Thanks for sharing and hope to get your next comment soon.

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    @opolismail

    Appreciate your comment on 2010 trends – mobile communication. But these days I am a bit less worried about e-mails that we are required to back up anyway to be able to produce them in case the court goes through an e-discovery process with us.

    This week, smartphone security risks are something I worry the most about.

    For instance, Wednesday (2010-08-04) the EU Commission announced that it does not allow its 32,000 employees to use a Blackberry because of security concerns.
    Nevertheless, the Commission has nothing against smartphones from Apple or HTC

    This is suprising since Apple iPhone just had another exploit in the wild reported this week. Late last year already (i.e.2009-11-19), Germany’s Ministry of the Interior urged other gov. departments and agencies neither to use smartphones from RIM (Blackberry) nor Apple’s iPhone due to security risks.

    This week (2010-08-04) it was made public that the current iOS 4.0.1 has an exploit in the wild that makes the iPod, iPhone, iPad all vulnerable to malicious PDF files.

    So while I believe secure e-mail is definitely a good thing, my concern is more about the many smartphones getting left behind in taxis and possibly getting into the wrong hands. As well, workers tweeting or e-mailing on their private smartphones and their toys being hacked should worry risk managers.

    I found particularly interesting the statement that the Opolis user sending an e-mail to another party:

    “… decides whether the recipient may copy, print, respond to or forward a message.”

    The above is interesting but everything can be copied if need be we do it the archaic way by just re-typing the text :-)

    As well, by backing up the information as the company is required by law it can still be part of the e-discovery process initiated by a court of law. u00a0All information is fully discoverable and the first place lawyers look when building a case.

    Hence, if you don’t want e-mail to be used the wrong u00a0way by the recipient, the best choice seems to neither send the information by e-mail nor using Twitter, that simple.

    Thanks for sharing and hope to get your next comment soon.

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    @opolismail

    Appreciate your comment on 2010 trends – mobile communication. But these days I am a bit less worried about e-mails that we are required to back up anyway to be able to produce them in case the court goes through an e-discovery process with us.

    This week, smartphone security risks are something I worry the most about.

    For instance, Wednesday (2010-08-04) the EU Commission announced that it does not allow its 32,000 employees to use a Blackberry because of security concerns.
    Nevertheless, the Commission has nothing against smartphones from Apple or HTC

    This is suprising since Apple iPhone just had another exploit in the wild reported this week. Late last year already (i.e.2009-11-19), Germany’s Ministry of the Interior urged other gov. departments and agencies neither to use smartphones from RIM (Blackberry) nor Apple’s iPhone due to security risks.

    This week (2010-08-04) it was made public that the current iOS 4.0.1 has an exploit in the wild that makes the iPod, iPhone, iPad all vulnerable to malicious PDF files.

    So while I believe secure e-mail is definitely a good thing, my concern is more about the many smartphones getting left behind in taxis and possibly getting into the wrong hands. As well, workers tweeting or e-mailing on their private smartphones and their toys being hacked should worry risk managers.

    I found particularly interesting the statement that the Opolis user sending an e-mail to another party:

    “… decides whether the recipient may copy, print, respond to or forward a message.”

    The above is interesting but everything can be copied if need be we do it the archaic way by just re-typing the text :-)

    As well, by backing up the information as the company is required by law it can still be part of the e-discovery process initiated by a court of law. u00a0All information is fully discoverable and the first place lawyers look when building a case.

    Hence, if you don’t want e-mail to be used the wrong u00a0way by the recipient, the best choice seems to neither send the information by e-mail nor using Twitter, that simple.

    Thanks for sharing and hope to get your next comment soon.

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    @opolismail

    Appreciate your comment on 2010 trends – mobile communication. But these days I am a bit less worried about e-mails that we are required to back up anyway to be able to produce them in case the court goes through an e-discovery process with us.

    This week, smartphone security risks are something I worry the most about.

    For instance, Wednesday (2010-08-04) the EU Commission announced that it does not allow its 32,000 employees to use a Blackberry because of security concerns.
    Nevertheless, the Commission has nothing against smartphones from Apple or HTC

    This is suprising since Apple iPhone just had another exploit in the wild reported this week. Late last year already (i.e.2009-11-19), Germany’s Ministry of the Interior urged other gov. departments and agencies neither to use smartphones from RIM (Blackberry) nor Apple’s iPhone due to security risks.

    This week (2010-08-04) it was made public that the current iOS 4.0.1 has an exploit in the wild that makes the iPod, iPhone, iPad all vulnerable to malicious PDF files.

    So while I believe secure e-mail is definitely a good thing, my concern is more about the many smartphones getting left behind in taxis and possibly getting into the wrong hands. As well, workers tweeting or e-mailing on their private smartphones and their toys being hacked should worry risk managers.

    I found particularly interesting the statement that the Opolis user sending an e-mail to another party:

    “… decides whether the recipient may copy, print, respond to or forward a message.”

    The above is interesting but everything can be copied if need be we do it the archaic way by just re-typing the text :-)

    As well, by backing up the information as the company is required by law it can still be part of the e-discovery process initiated by a court of law. u00a0All information is fully discoverable and the first place lawyers look when building a case.

    Hence, if you don’t want e-mail to be used the wrong u00a0way by the recipient, the best choice seems to neither send the information by e-mail nor using Twitter, that simple.

    Thanks for sharing and hope to get your next comment soon.

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    @opolismail

    Appreciate your comment on 2010 trends – mobile communication. But these days I am a bit less worried about e-mails that we are required to back up anyway to be able to produce them in case the court goes through an e-discovery process with us.

    This week, smartphone security risks are something I worry the most about.

    For instance, Wednesday (2010-08-04) the EU Commission announced that it does not allow its 32,000 employees to use a Blackberry because of security concerns.
    Nevertheless, the Commission has nothing against smartphones from Apple or HTC

    This is suprising since Apple iPhone just had another exploit in the wild reported this week. Late last year already (i.e.2009-11-19), Germany’s Ministry of the Interior urged other gov. departments and agencies neither to use smartphones from RIM (Blackberry) nor Apple’s iPhone due to security risks.

    This week (2010-08-04) it was made public that the current iOS 4.0.1 has an exploit in the wild that makes the iPod, iPhone, iPad all vulnerable to malicious PDF files.

    So while I believe secure e-mail is definitely a good thing, my concern is more about the many smartphones getting left behind in taxis and possibly getting into the wrong hands. As well, workers tweeting or e-mailing on their private smartphones and their toys being hacked should worry risk managers.

    I found particularly interesting the statement that the Opolis user sending an e-mail to another party:

    “… decides whether the recipient may copy, print, respond to or forward a message.”

    The above is interesting but everything can be copied if need be we do it the archaic way by just re-typing the text :-)

    As well, by backing up the information as the company is required by law it can still be part of the e-discovery process initiated by a court of law. u00a0All information is fully discoverable and the first place lawyers look when building a case.

    Hence, if you don’t want e-mail to be used the wrong u00a0way by the recipient, the best choice seems to neither send the information by e-mail nor using Twitter, that simple.

    Thanks for sharing and hope to get your next comment soon.

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    @opolismail

    Appreciate your comment on 2010 trends – mobile communication. But these days I am a bit less worried about e-mails that we are required to back up anyway to be able to produce them in case the court goes through an e-discovery process with us.

    This week, smartphone security risks are something I worry the most about.

    For instance, Wednesday (2010-08-04) the EU Commission announced that it does not allow its 32,000 employees to use a Blackberry because of security concerns.
    Nevertheless, the Commission has nothing against smartphones from Apple or HTC

    This is suprising since Apple iPhone just had another exploit in the wild reported this week. Late last year already (i.e.2009-11-19), Germany’s Ministry of the Interior urged other gov. departments and agencies neither to use smartphones from RIM (Blackberry) nor Apple’s iPhone due to security risks.

    This week (2010-08-04) it was made public that the current iOS 4.0.1 has an exploit in the wild that makes the iPod, iPhone, iPad all vulnerable to malicious PDF files.

    So while I believe secure e-mail is definitely a good thing, my concern is more about the many smartphones getting left behind in taxis and possibly getting into the wrong hands. As well, workers tweeting or e-mailing on their private smartphones and their toys being hacked should worry risk managers.

    I found particularly interesting the statement that the Opolis user sending an e-mail to another party:

    “… decides whether the recipient may copy, print, respond to or forward a message.”

    The above is interesting but everything can be copied if need be we do it the archaic way by just re-typing the text :-)

    As well, by backing up the information as the company is required by law it can still be part of the e-discovery process initiated by a court of law. u00a0All information is fully discoverable and the first place lawyers look when building a case.

    Hence, if you don’t want e-mail to be used the wrong u00a0way by the recipient, the best choice seems to neither send the information by e-mail nor using Twitter, that simple.

    Thanks for sharing and hope to get your next comment soon.

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    @opolismail

    Appreciate your comment on 2010 trends – mobile communication. But these days I am a bit less worried about e-mails that we are required to back up anyway to be able to produce them in case the court goes through an e-discovery process with us.

    This week, smartphone security risks are something I worry the most about.

    For instance, Wednesday (2010-08-04) the EU Commission announced that it does not allow its 32,000 employees to use a Blackberry because of security concerns.
    Nevertheless, the Commission has nothing against smartphones from Apple or HTC

    This is suprising since Apple iPhone just had another exploit in the wild reported this week. Late last year already (i.e.2009-11-19), Germany’s Ministry of the Interior urged other gov. departments and agencies neither to use smartphones from RIM (Blackberry) nor Apple’s iPhone due to security risks.

    This week (2010-08-04) it was made public that the current iOS 4.0.1 has an exploit in the wild that makes the iPod, iPhone, iPad all vulnerable to malicious PDF files.

    So while I believe secure e-mail is definitely a good thing, my concern is more about the many smartphones getting left behind in taxis and possibly getting into the wrong hands. As well, workers tweeting or e-mailing on their private smartphones and their toys being hacked should worry risk managers.

    I found particularly interesting the statement that the Opolis user sending an e-mail to another party:

    “… decides whether the recipient may copy, print, respond to or forward a message.”

    The above is interesting but everything can be copied if need be we do it the archaic way by just re-typing the text :-)

    As well, by backing up the information as the company is required by law it can still be part of the e-discovery process initiated by a court of law. u00a0All information is fully discoverable and the first place lawyers look when building a case.

    Hence, if you don’t want e-mail to be used the wrong u00a0way by the recipient, the best choice seems to neither send the information by e-mail nor using Twitter, that simple.

    Thanks for sharing and hope to get your next comment soon.

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    @opolismail

    Appreciate your comment on 2010 trends – mobile communication. But these days I am a bit less worried about e-mails that we are required to back up anyway to be able to produce them in case the court goes through an e-discovery process with us.

    This week, smartphone security risks are something I worry the most about.

    For instance, Wednesday (2010-08-04) the EU Commission announced that it does not allow its 32,000 employees to use a Blackberry because of security concerns.
    Nevertheless, the Commission has nothing against smartphones from Apple or HTC

    This is suprising since Apple iPhone just had another exploit in the wild reported this week. Late last year already (i.e.2009-11-19), Germany’s Ministry of the Interior urged other gov. departments and agencies neither to use smartphones from RIM (Blackberry) nor Apple’s iPhone due to security risks.

    This week (2010-08-04) it was made public that the current iOS 4.0.1 has an exploit in the wild that makes the iPod, iPhone, iPad all vulnerable to malicious PDF files.

    So while I believe secure e-mail is definitely a good thing, my concern is more about the many smartphones getting left behind in taxis and possibly getting into the wrong hands. As well, workers tweeting or e-mailing on their private smartphones and their toys being hacked should worry risk managers.

    I found particularly interesting the statement that the Opolis user sending an e-mail to another party:

    “… decides whether the recipient may copy, print, respond to or forward a message.”

    The above is interesting but everything can be copied if need be we do it the archaic way by just re-typing the text :-)

    As well, by backing up the information as the company is required by law it can still be part of the e-discovery process initiated by a court of law. u00a0All information is fully discoverable and the first place lawyers look when building a case.

    Hence, if you don’t want e-mail to be used the wrong u00a0way by the recipient, the best choice seems to neither send the information by e-mail nor using Twitter, that simple.

    Thanks for sharing and hope to get your next comment soon.

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    @opolismail

    Appreciate your comment on 2010 trends – mobile communication. But these days I am a bit less worried about e-mails that we are required to back up anyway to be able to produce them in case the court goes through an e-discovery process with us.

    This week, smartphone security risks are something I worry the most about.

    For instance, Wednesday (2010-08-04) the EU Commission announced that it does not allow its 32,000 employees to use a Blackberry because of security concerns.
    Nevertheless, the Commission has nothing against smartphones from Apple or HTC

    This is suprising since Apple iPhone just had another exploit in the wild reported this week. Late last year already (i.e.2009-11-19), Germany’s Ministry of the Interior urged other gov. departments and agencies neither to use smartphones from RIM (Blackberry) nor Apple’s iPhone due to security risks.

    This week (2010-08-04) it was made public that the current iOS 4.0.1 has an exploit in the wild that makes the iPod, iPhone, iPad all vulnerable to malicious PDF files.

    So while I believe secure e-mail is definitely a good thing, my concern is more about the many smartphones getting left behind in taxis and possibly getting into the wrong hands. As well, workers tweeting or e-mailing on their private smartphones and their toys being hacked should worry risk managers.

    I found particularly interesting the statement that the Opolis user sending an e-mail to another party:

    “… decides whether the recipient may copy, print, respond to or forward a message.”

    The above is interesting but everything can be copied if need be we do it the archaic way by just re-typing the text :-)

    As well, by backing up the information as the company is required by law it can still be part of the e-discovery process initiated by a court of law. u00a0All information is fully discoverable and the first place lawyers look when building a case.

    Hence, if you don’t want e-mail to be used the wrong u00a0way by the recipient, the best choice seems to neither send the information by e-mail nor using Twitter, that simple.

    Thanks for sharing and hope to get your next comment soon.

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    @opolismail

    Appreciate your comment on 2010 trends – mobile communication. But these days I am a bit less worried about e-mails that we are required to back up anyway to be able to produce them in case the court goes through an e-discovery process with us.

    This week, smartphone security risks are something I worry the most about.

    For instance, Wednesday (2010-08-04) the EU Commission announced that it does not allow its 32,000 employees to use a Blackberry because of security concerns.
    Nevertheless, the Commission has nothing against smartphones from Apple or HTC

    This is suprising since Apple iPhone just had another exploit in the wild reported this week. Late last year already (i.e.2009-11-19), Germany’s Ministry of the Interior urged other gov. departments and agencies neither to use smartphones from RIM (Blackberry) nor Apple’s iPhone due to security risks.

    This week (2010-08-04) it was made public that the current iOS 4.0.1 has an exploit in the wild that makes the iPod, iPhone, iPad all vulnerable to malicious PDF files.

    So while I believe secure e-mail is definitely a good thing, my concern is more about the many smartphones getting left behind in taxis and possibly getting into the wrong hands. As well, workers tweeting or e-mailing on their private smartphones and their toys being hacked should worry risk managers.

    I found particularly interesting the statement that the Opolis user sending an e-mail to another party:

    “… decides whether the recipient may copy, print, respond to or forward a message.”

    The above is interesting but everything can be copied if need be we do it the archaic way by just re-typing the text :-)

    As well, by backing up the information as the company is required by law it can still be part of the e-discovery process initiated by a court of law. u00a0All information is fully discoverable and the first place lawyers look when building a case.

    Hence, if you don’t want e-mail to be used the wrong u00a0way by the recipient, the best choice seems to neither send the information by e-mail nor using Twitter, that simple.

    Thanks for sharing and hope to get your next comment soon.

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    @opolismail

    Appreciate your comment on 2010 trends – mobile communication. But these days I am a bit less worried about e-mails that we are required to back up anyway to be able to produce them in case the court goes through an e-discovery process with us.

    This week, smartphone security risks are something I worry the most about.

    For instance, Wednesday (2010-08-04) the EU Commission announced that it does not allow its 32,000 employees to use a Blackberry because of security concerns.
    Nevertheless, the Commission has nothing against smartphones from Apple or HTC

    This is suprising since Apple iPhone just had another exploit in the wild reported this week. Late last year already (i.e.2009-11-19), Germany’s Ministry of the Interior urged other gov. departments and agencies neither to use smartphones from RIM (Blackberry) nor Apple’s iPhone due to security risks.

    This week (2010-08-04) it was made public that the current iOS 4.0.1 has an exploit in the wild that makes the iPod, iPhone, iPad all vulnerable to malicious PDF files.

    So while I believe secure e-mail is definitely a good thing, my concern is more about the many smartphones getting left behind in taxis and possibly getting into the wrong hands. As well, workers tweeting or e-mailing on their private smartphones and their toys being hacked should worry risk managers.

    I found particularly interesting the statement that the Opolis user sending an e-mail to another party:

    “… decides whether the recipient may copy, print, respond to or forward a message.”

    The above is interesting but everything can be copied if need be we do it the archaic way by just re-typing the text :-)

    As well, by backing up the information as the company is required by law it can still be part of the e-discovery process initiated by a court of law. u00a0All information is fully discoverable and the first place lawyers look when building a case.

    Hence, if you don’t want e-mail to be used the wrong u00a0way by the recipient, the best choice seems to neither send the information by e-mail nor using Twitter, that simple.

    Thanks for sharing and hope to get your next comment soon.

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    @opolismail

    Appreciate your comment on 2010 trends – mobile communication. But these days I am a bit less worried about e-mails that we are required to back up anyway to be able to produce them in case the court goes through an e-discovery process with us.

    This week, smartphone security risks are something I worry the most about.

    For instance, Wednesday (2010-08-04) the EU Commission announced that it does not allow its 32,000 employees to use a Blackberry because of security concerns.
    Nevertheless, the Commission has nothing against smartphones from Apple or HTC

    This is suprising since Apple iPhone just had another exploit in the wild reported this week. Late last year already (i.e.2009-11-19), Germany’s Ministry of the Interior urged other gov. departments and agencies neither to use smartphones from RIM (Blackberry) nor Apple’s iPhone due to security risks.

    This week (2010-08-04) it was made public that the current iOS 4.0.1 has an exploit in the wild that makes the iPod, iPhone, iPad all vulnerable to malicious PDF files.

    So while I believe secure e-mail is definitely a good thing, my concern is more about the many smartphones getting left behind in taxis and possibly getting into the wrong hands. As well, workers tweeting or e-mailing on their private smartphones and their toys being hacked should worry risk managers.

    I found particularly interesting the statement that the Opolis user sending an e-mail to another party:

    “… decides whether the recipient may copy, print, respond to or forward a message.”

    The above is interesting but everything can be copied if need be we do it the archaic way by just re-typing the text :-)

    As well, by backing up the information as the company is required by law it can still be part of the e-discovery process initiated by a court of law. u00a0All information is fully discoverable and the first place lawyers look when building a case.

    Hence, if you don’t want e-mail to be used the wrong u00a0way by the recipient, the best choice seems to neither send the information by e-mail nor using Twitter, that simple.

    Thanks for sharing and hope to get your next comment soon.

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    @opolismail

    Appreciate your comment on 2010 trends – mobile communication. But these days I am a bit less worried about e-mails that we are required to back up anyway to be able to produce them in case the court goes through an e-discovery process with us.

    This week, smartphone security risks are something I worry the most about.

    For instance, Wednesday (2010-08-04) the EU Commission announced that it does not allow its 32,000 employees to use a Blackberry because of security concerns.
    Nevertheless, the Commission has nothing against smartphones from Apple or HTC

    This is suprising since Apple iPhone just had another exploit in the wild reported this week. Late last year already (i.e.2009-11-19), Germany’s Ministry of the Interior urged other gov. departments and agencies neither to use smartphones from RIM (Blackberry) nor Apple’s iPhone due to security risks.

    This week (2010-08-04) it was made public that the current iOS 4.0.1 has an exploit in the wild that makes the iPod, iPhone, iPad all vulnerable to malicious PDF files.

    So while I believe secure e-mail is definitely a good thing, my concern is more about the many smartphones getting left behind in taxis and possibly getting into the wrong hands. As well, workers tweeting or e-mailing on their private smartphones and their toys being hacked should worry risk managers.

    I found particularly interesting the statement that the Opolis user sending an e-mail to another party:

    “… decides whether the recipient may copy, print, respond to or forward a message.”

    The above is interesting but everything can be copied if need be we do it the archaic way by just re-typing the text :-)

    As well, by backing up the information as the company is required by law it can still be part of the e-discovery process initiated by a court of law. u00a0All information is fully discoverable and the first place lawyers look when building a case.

    Hence, if you don’t want e-mail to be used the wrong u00a0way by the recipient, the best choice seems to neither send the information by e-mail nor using Twitter, that simple.

    Thanks for sharing and hope to get your next comment soon.

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    @opolismail

    Appreciate your comment on 2010 trends – mobile communication. But these days I am a bit less worried about e-mails that we are required to back up anyway to be able to produce them in case the court goes through an e-discovery process with us.

    This week, smartphone security risks are something I worry the most about.

    For instance, Wednesday (2010-08-04) the EU Commission announced that it does not allow its 32,000 employees to use a Blackberry because of security concerns.
    Nevertheless, the Commission has nothing against smartphones from Apple or HTC

    This is suprising since Apple iPhone just had another exploit in the wild reported this week. Late last year already (i.e.2009-11-19), Germany’s Ministry of the Interior urged other gov. departments and agencies neither to use smartphones from RIM (Blackberry) nor Apple’s iPhone due to security risks.

    This week (2010-08-04) it was made public that the current iOS 4.0.1 has an exploit in the wild that makes the iPod, iPhone, iPad all vulnerable to malicious PDF files.

    So while I believe secure e-mail is definitely a good thing, my concern is more about the many smartphones getting left behind in taxis and possibly getting into the wrong hands. As well, workers tweeting or e-mailing on their private smartphones and their toys being hacked should worry risk managers.

    I found particularly interesting the statement that the Opolis user sending an e-mail to another party:

    “… decides whether the recipient may copy, print, respond to or forward a message.”

    The above is interesting but everything can be copied if need be we do it the archaic way by just re-typing the text :-)

    As well, by backing up the information as the company is required by law it can still be part of the e-discovery process initiated by a court of law. u00a0All information is fully discoverable and the first place lawyers look when building a case.

    Hence, if you don’t want e-mail to be used the wrong u00a0way by the recipient, the best choice seems to neither send the information by e-mail nor using Twitter, that simple.

    Thanks for sharing and hope to get your next comment soon.

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    @opolismail

    Appreciate your comment on 2010 trends – mobile communication. But these days I am a bit less worried about e-mails that we are required to back up anyway to be able to produce them in case the court goes through an e-discovery process with us.

    This week, smartphone security risks are something I worry the most about.

    For instance, Wednesday (2010-08-04) the EU Commission announced that it does not allow its 32,000 employees to use a Blackberry because of security concerns.
    Nevertheless, the Commission has nothing against smartphones from Apple or HTC

    This is suprising since Apple iPhone just had another exploit in the wild reported this week. Late last year already (i.e.2009-11-19), Germany’s Ministry of the Interior urged other gov. departments and agencies neither to use smartphones from RIM (Blackberry) nor Apple’s iPhone due to security risks.

    This week (2010-08-04) it was made public that the current iOS 4.0.1 has an exploit in the wild that makes the iPod, iPhone, iPad all vulnerable to malicious PDF files.

    So while I believe secure e-mail is definitely a good thing, my concern is more about the many smartphones getting left behind in taxis and possibly getting into the wrong hands. As well, workers tweeting or e-mailing on their private smartphones and their toys being hacked should worry risk managers.

    I found particularly interesting the statement that the Opolis user sending an e-mail to another party:

    “… decides whether the recipient may copy, print, respond to or forward a message.”

    The above is interesting but everything can be copied if need be we do it the archaic way by just re-typing the text :-)

    As well, by backing up the information as the company is required by law it can still be part of the e-discovery process initiated by a court of law. u00a0All information is fully discoverable and the first place lawyers look when building a case.

    Hence, if you don’t want e-mail to be used the wrong u00a0way by the recipient, the best choice seems to neither send the information by e-mail nor using Twitter, that simple.

    Thanks for sharing and hope to get your next comment soon.

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    @opolismail

    Appreciate your comment on 2010 trends – mobile communication. But these days I am a bit less worried about e-mails that we are required to back up anyway to be able to produce them in case the court goes through an e-discovery process with us.

    This week, smartphone security risks are something I worry the most about.

    For instance, Wednesday (2010-08-04) the EU Commission announced that it does not allow its 32,000 employees to use a Blackberry because of security concerns.
    Nevertheless, the Commission has nothing against smartphones from Apple or HTC

    This is suprising since Apple iPhone just had another exploit in the wild reported this week. Late last year already (i.e.2009-11-19), Germany’s Ministry of the Interior urged other gov. departments and agencies neither to use smartphones from RIM (Blackberry) nor Apple’s iPhone due to security risks.

    This week (2010-08-04) it was made public that the current iOS 4.0.1 has an exploit in the wild that makes the iPod, iPhone, iPad all vulnerable to malicious PDF files.

    So while I believe secure e-mail is definitely a good thing, my concern is more about the many smartphones getting left behind in taxis and possibly getting into the wrong hands. As well, workers tweeting or e-mailing on their private smartphones and their toys being hacked should worry risk managers.

    I found particularly interesting the statement that the Opolis user sending an e-mail to another party:

    “… decides whether the recipient may copy, print, respond to or forward a message.”

    The above is interesting but everything can be copied if need be we do it the archaic way by just re-typing the text :-)

    As well, by backing up the information as the company is required by law it can still be part of the e-discovery process initiated by a court of law. u00a0All information is fully discoverable and the first place lawyers look when building a case.

    Hence, if you don’t want e-mail to be used the wrong u00a0way by the recipient, the best choice seems to neither send the information by e-mail nor using Twitter, that simple.

    Thanks for sharing and hope to get your next comment soon.

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    @opolismail

    Appreciate your comment on 2010 trends – mobile communication. But these days I am a bit less worried about e-mails that we are required to back up anyway to be able to produce them in case the court goes through an e-discovery process with us.

    This week, smartphone security risks are something I worry the most about.

    For instance, Wednesday (2010-08-04) the EU Commission announced that it does not allow its 32,000 employees to use a Blackberry because of security concerns.
    Nevertheless, the Commission has nothing against smartphones from Apple or HTC

    This is suprising since Apple iPhone just had another exploit in the wild reported this week. Late last year already (i.e.2009-11-19), Germany’s Ministry of the Interior urged other gov. departments and agencies neither to use smartphones from RIM (Blackberry) nor Apple’s iPhone due to security risks.

    This week (2010-08-04) it was made public that the current iOS 4.0.1 has an exploit in the wild that makes the iPod, iPhone, iPad all vulnerable to malicious PDF files.

    So while I believe secure e-mail is definitely a good thing, my concern is more about the many smartphones getting left behind in taxis and possibly getting into the wrong hands. As well, workers tweeting or e-mailing on their private smartphones and their toys being hacked should worry risk managers.

    I found particularly interesting the statement that the Opolis user sending an e-mail to another party:

    “… decides whether the recipient may copy, print, respond to or forward a message.”

    The above is interesting but everything can be copied if need be we do it the archaic way by just re-typing the text :-)

    As well, by backing up the information as the company is required by law it can still be part of the e-discovery process initiated by a court of law. u00a0All information is fully discoverable and the first place lawyers look when building a case.

    Hence, if you don’t want e-mail to be used the wrong u00a0way by the recipient, the best choice seems to neither send the information by e-mail nor using Twitter, that simple.

    Thanks for sharing and hope to get your next comment soon.

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    @opolismail

    Appreciate your comment on 2010 trends – mobile communication. But these days I am a bit less worried about e-mails that we are required to back up anyway to be able to produce them in case the court goes through an e-discovery process with us.

    This week, smartphone security risks are something I worry the most about.

    For instance, Wednesday (2010-08-04) the EU Commission announced that it does not allow its 32,000 employees to use a Blackberry because of security concerns.
    Nevertheless, the Commission has nothing against smartphones from Apple or HTC

    This is suprising since Apple iPhone just had another exploit in the wild reported this week. Late last year already (i.e.2009-11-19), Germany’s Ministry of the Interior urged other gov. departments and agencies neither to use smartphones from RIM (Blackberry) nor Apple’s iPhone due to security risks.

    This week (2010-08-04) it was made public that the current iOS 4.0.1 has an exploit in the wild that makes the iPod, iPhone, iPad all vulnerable to malicious PDF files.

    So while I believe secure e-mail is definitely a good thing, my concern is more about the many smartphones getting left behind in taxis and possibly getting into the wrong hands. As well, workers tweeting or e-mailing on their private smartphones and their toys being hacked should worry risk managers.

    I found particularly interesting the statement that the Opolis user sending an e-mail to another party:

    “… decides whether the recipient may copy, print, respond to or forward a message.”

    The above is interesting but everything can be copied if need be we do it the archaic way by just re-typing the text :-)

    As well, by backing up the information as the company is required by law it can still be part of the e-discovery process initiated by a court of law. u00a0All information is fully discoverable and the first place lawyers look when building a case.

    Hence, if you don’t want e-mail to be used the wrong u00a0way by the recipient, the best choice seems to neither send the information by e-mail nor using Twitter, that simple.

    Thanks for sharing and hope to get your next comment soon.

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    @opolismail

    Appreciate your comment on 2010 trends – mobile communication. But these days I am a bit less worried about e-mails that we are required to back up anyway to be able to produce them in case the court goes through an e-discovery process with us.

    This week, smartphone security risks are something I worry the most about.

    For instance, Wednesday (2010-08-04) the EU Commission announced that it does not allow its 32,000 employees to use a Blackberry because of security concerns.
    Nevertheless, the Commission has nothing against smartphones from Apple or HTC

    This is suprising since Apple iPhone just had another exploit in the wild reported this week. Late last year already (i.e.2009-11-19), Germany’s Ministry of the Interior urged other gov. departments and agencies neither to use smartphones from RIM (Blackberry) nor Apple’s iPhone due to security risks.

    This week (2010-08-04) it was made public that the current iOS 4.0.1 has an exploit in the wild that makes the iPod, iPhone, iPad all vulnerable to malicious PDF files.

    So while I believe secure e-mail is definitely a good thing, my concern is more about the many smartphones getting left behind in taxis and possibly getting into the wrong hands. As well, workers tweeting or e-mailing on their private smartphones and their toys being hacked should worry risk managers.

    I found particularly interesting the statement that the Opolis user sending an e-mail to another party:

    “… decides whether the recipient may copy, print, respond to or forward a message.”

    The above is interesting but everything can be copied if need be we do it the archaic way by just re-typing the text :-)

    As well, by backing up the information as the company is required by law it can still be part of the e-discovery process initiated by a court of law. u00a0All information is fully discoverable and the first place lawyers look when building a case.

    Hence, if you don’t want e-mail to be used the wrong u00a0way by the recipient, the best choice seems to neither send the information by e-mail nor using Twitter, that simple.

    Thanks for sharing and hope to get your next comment soon.

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    @opolismail

    Appreciate your comment on 2010 trends – mobile communication. But these days I am a bit less worried about e-mails that we are required to back up anyway to be able to produce them in case the court goes through an e-discovery process with us.

    This week, smartphone security risks are something I worry the most about.

    For instance, Wednesday (2010-08-04) the EU Commission announced that it does not allow its 32,000 employees to use a Blackberry because of security concerns.
    Nevertheless, the Commission has nothing against smartphones from Apple or HTC

    This is suprising since Apple iPhone just had another exploit in the wild reported this week. Late last year already (i.e.2009-11-19), Germany’s Ministry of the Interior urged other gov. departments and agencies neither to use smartphones from RIM (Blackberry) nor Apple’s iPhone due to security risks.

    This week (2010-08-04) it was made public that the current iOS 4.0.1 has an exploit in the wild that makes the iPod, iPhone, iPad all vulnerable to malicious PDF files.

    So while I believe secure e-mail is definitely a good thing, my concern is more about the many smartphones getting left behind in taxis and possibly getting into the wrong hands. As well, workers tweeting or e-mailing on their private smartphones and their toys being hacked should worry risk managers.

    I found particularly interesting the statement that the Opolis user sending an e-mail to another party:

    “… decides whether the recipient may copy, print, respond to or forward a message.”

    The above is interesting but everything can be copied if need be we do it the archaic way by just re-typing the text :-)

    As well, by backing up the information as the company is required by law it can still be part of the e-discovery process initiated by a court of law. u00a0All information is fully discoverable and the first place lawyers look when building a case.

    Hence, if you don’t want e-mail to be used the wrong u00a0way by the recipient, the best choice seems to neither send the information by e-mail nor using Twitter, that simple.

    Thanks for sharing and hope to get your next comment soon.

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    @opolismail

    Appreciate your comment on 2010 trends – mobile communication. But these days I am a bit less worried about e-mails that we are required to back up anyway to be able to produce them in case the court goes through an e-discovery process with us.

    This week, smartphone security risks are something I worry the most about.

    For instance, Wednesday (2010-08-04) the EU Commission announced that it does not allow its 32,000 employees to use a Blackberry because of security concerns.
    Nevertheless, the Commission has nothing against smartphones from Apple or HTC

    This is suprising since Apple iPhone just had another exploit in the wild reported this week. Late last year already (i.e.2009-11-19), Germany’s Ministry of the Interior urged other gov. departments and agencies neither to use smartphones from RIM (Blackberry) nor Apple’s iPhone due to security risks.

    This week (2010-08-04) it was made public that the current iOS 4.0.1 has an exploit in the wild that makes the iPod, iPhone, iPad all vulnerable to malicious PDF files.

    So while I believe secure e-mail is definitely a good thing, my concern is more about the many smartphones getting left behind in taxis and possibly getting into the wrong hands. As well, workers tweeting or e-mailing on their private smartphones and their toys being hacked should worry risk managers.

    I found particularly interesting the statement that the Opolis user sending an e-mail to another party:

    “… decides whether the recipient may copy, print, respond to or forward a message.”

    The above is interesting but everything can be copied if need be we do it the archaic way by just re-typing the text :-)

    As well, by backing up the information as the company is required by law it can still be part of the e-discovery process initiated by a court of law. u00a0All information is fully discoverable and the first place lawyers look when building a case.

    Hence, if you don’t want e-mail to be used the wrong u00a0way by the recipient, the best choice seems to neither send the information by e-mail nor using Twitter, that simple.

    Thanks for sharing and hope to get your next comment soon.

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    @opolismail

    Appreciate your comment on 2010 trends – mobile communication. But these days I am a bit less worried about e-mails that we are required to back up anyway to be able to produce them in case the court goes through an e-discovery process with us.

    This week, smartphone security risks are something I worry the most about.

    For instance, Wednesday (2010-08-04) the EU Commission announced that it does not allow its 32,000 employees to use a Blackberry because of security concerns.
    Nevertheless, the Commission has nothing against smartphones from Apple or HTC

    This is suprising since Apple iPhone just had another exploit in the wild reported this week. Late last year already (i.e.2009-11-19), Germany’s Ministry of the Interior urged other gov. departments and agencies neither to use smartphones from RIM (Blackberry) nor Apple’s iPhone due to security risks.

    This week (2010-08-04) it was made public that the current iOS 4.0.1 has an exploit in the wild that makes the iPod, iPhone, iPad all vulnerable to malicious PDF files.

    So while I believe secure e-mail is definitely a good thing, my concern is more about the many smartphones getting left behind in taxis and possibly getting into the wrong hands. As well, workers tweeting or e-mailing on their private smartphones and their toys being hacked should worry risk managers.

    I found particularly interesting the statement that the Opolis user sending an e-mail to another party:

    “… decides whether the recipient may copy, print, respond to or forward a message.”

    The above is interesting but everything can be copied if need be we do it the archaic way by just re-typing the text :-)

    As well, by backing up the information as the company is required by law it can still be part of the e-discovery process initiated by a court of law. u00a0All information is fully discoverable and the first place lawyers look when building a case.

    Hence, if you don’t want e-mail to be used the wrong u00a0way by the recipient, the best choice seems to neither send the information by e-mail nor using Twitter, that simple.

    Thanks for sharing and hope to get your next comment soon.

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    @opolismail

    Appreciate your comment on 2010 trends – mobile communication. But these days I am a bit less worried about e-mails that we are required to back up anyway to be able to produce them in case the court goes through an e-discovery process with us.

    This week, smartphone security risks are something I worry the most about.

    For instance, Wednesday (2010-08-04) the EU Commission announced that it does not allow its 32,000 employees to use a Blackberry because of security concerns.
    Nevertheless, the Commission has nothing against smartphones from Apple or HTC

    This is suprising since Apple iPhone just had another exploit in the wild reported this week. Late last year already (i.e.2009-11-19), Germany’s Ministry of the Interior urged other gov. departments and agencies neither to use smartphones from RIM (Blackberry) nor Apple’s iPhone due to security risks.

    This week (2010-08-04) it was made public that the current iOS 4.0.1 has an exploit in the wild that makes the iPod, iPhone, iPad all vulnerable to malicious PDF files.

    So while I believe secure e-mail is definitely a good thing, my concern is more about the many smartphones getting left behind in taxis and possibly getting into the wrong hands. As well, workers tweeting or e-mailing on their private smartphones and their toys being hacked should worry risk managers.

    I found particularly interesting the statement that the Opolis user sending an e-mail to another party:

    “… decides whether the recipient may copy, print, respond to or forward a message.”

    The above is interesting but everything can be copied if need be we do it the archaic way by just re-typing the text :-)

    As well, by backing up the information as the company is required by law it can still be part of the e-discovery process initiated by a court of law. u00a0All information is fully discoverable and the first place lawyers look when building a case.

    Hence, if you don’t want e-mail to be used the wrong u00a0way by the recipient, the best choice seems to neither send the information by e-mail nor using Twitter, that simple.

    Thanks for sharing and hope to get your next comment soon.

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    @opolismail

    Appreciate your comment on 2010 trends – mobile communication. But these days I am a bit less worried about e-mails that we are required to back up anyway to be able to produce them in case the court goes through an e-discovery process with us.

    This week, smartphone security risks are something I worry the most about.

    For instance, Wednesday (2010-08-04) the EU Commission announced that it does not allow its 32,000 employees to use a Blackberry because of security concerns.
    Nevertheless, the Commission has nothing against smartphones from Apple or HTC

    This is suprising since Apple iPhone just had another exploit in the wild reported this week. Late last year already (i.e.2009-11-19), Germany’s Ministry of the Interior urged other gov. departments and agencies neither to use smartphones from RIM (Blackberry) nor Apple’s iPhone due to security risks.

    This week (2010-08-04) it was made public that the current iOS 4.0.1 has an exploit in the wild that makes the iPod, iPhone, iPad all vulnerable to malicious PDF files.

    So while I believe secure e-mail is definitely a good thing, my concern is more about the many smartphones getting left behind in taxis and possibly getting into the wrong hands. As well, workers tweeting or e-mailing on their private smartphones and their toys being hacked should worry risk managers.

    I found particularly interesting the statement that the Opolis user sending an e-mail to another party:

    “… decides whether the recipient may copy, print, respond to or forward a message.”

    The above is interesting but everything can be copied if need be we do it the archaic way by just re-typing the text :-)

    As well, by backing up the information as the company is required by law it can still be part of the e-discovery process initiated by a court of law. u00a0All information is fully discoverable and the first place lawyers look when building a case.

    Hence, if you don’t want e-mail to be used the wrong u00a0way by the recipient, the best choice seems to neither send the information by e-mail nor using Twitter, that simple.

    Thanks for sharing and hope to get your next comment soon.

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    @opolismail

    Appreciate your comment on 2010 trends – mobile communication. But these days I am a bit less worried about e-mails that we are required to back up anyway to be able to produce them in case the court goes through an e-discovery process with us.

    This week, smartphone security risks are something I worry the most about.

    For instance, Wednesday (2010-08-04) the EU Commission announced that it does not allow its 32,000 employees to use a Blackberry because of security concerns.
    Nevertheless, the Commission has nothing against smartphones from Apple or HTC

    This is suprising since Apple iPhone just had another exploit in the wild reported this week. Late last year already (i.e.2009-11-19), Germany’s Ministry of the Interior urged other gov. departments and agencies neither to use smartphones from RIM (Blackberry) nor Apple’s iPhone due to security risks.

    This week (2010-08-04) it was made public that the current iOS 4.0.1 has an exploit in the wild that makes the iPod, iPhone, iPad all vulnerable to malicious PDF files.

    So while I believe secure e-mail is definitely a good thing, my concern is more about the many smartphones getting left behind in taxis and possibly getting into the wrong hands. As well, workers tweeting or e-mailing on their private smartphones and their toys being hacked should worry risk managers.

    I found particularly interesting the statement that the Opolis user sending an e-mail to another party:

    “… decides whether the recipient may copy, print, respond to or forward a message.”

    The above is interesting but everything can be copied if need be we do it the archaic way by just re-typing the text :-)

    As well, by backing up the information as the company is required by law it can still be part of the e-discovery process initiated by a court of law. u00a0All information is fully discoverable and the first place lawyers look when building a case.

    Hence, if you don’t want e-mail to be used the wrong u00a0way by the recipient, the best choice seems to neither send the information by e-mail nor using Twitter, that simple.

    Thanks for sharing and hope to get your next comment soon.

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    @opolismail

    Appreciate your comment on 2010 trends – mobile communication. But these days I am a bit less worried about e-mails that we are required to back up anyway to be able to produce them in case the court goes through an e-discovery process with us.

    This week, smartphone security risks are something I worry the most about.

    For instance, Wednesday (2010-08-04) the EU Commission announced that it does not allow its 32,000 employees to use a Blackberry because of security concerns.
    Nevertheless, the Commission has nothing against smartphones from Apple or HTC

    This is suprising since Apple iPhone just had another exploit in the wild reported this week. Late last year already (i.e.2009-11-19), Germany’s Ministry of the Interior urged other gov. departments and agencies neither to use smartphones from RIM (Blackberry) nor Apple’s iPhone due to security risks.

    This week (2010-08-04) it was made public that the current iOS 4.0.1 has an exploit in the wild that makes the iPod, iPhone, iPad all vulnerable to malicious PDF files.

    So while I believe secure e-mail is definitely a good thing, my concern is more about the many smartphones getting left behind in taxis and possibly getting into the wrong hands. As well, workers tweeting or e-mailing on their private smartphones and their toys being hacked should worry risk managers.

    I found particularly interesting the statement that the Opolis user sending an e-mail to another party:

    “… decides whether the recipient may copy, print, respond to or forward a message.”

    The above is interesting but everything can be copied if need be we do it the archaic way by just re-typing the text :-)

    As well, by backing up the information as the company is required by law it can still be part of the e-discovery process initiated by a court of law. u00a0All information is fully discoverable and the first place lawyers look when building a case.

    Hence, if you don’t want e-mail to be used the wrong u00a0way by the recipient, the best choice seems to neither send the information by e-mail nor using Twitter, that simple.

    Thanks for sharing and hope to get your next comment soon.

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    @opolismail

    Appreciate your comment on 2010 trends – mobile communication. But these days I am a bit less worried about e-mails that we are required to back up anyway to be able to produce them in case the court goes through an e-discovery process with us.

    This week, smartphone security risks are something I worry the most about.

    For instance, Wednesday (2010-08-04) the EU Commission announced that it does not allow its 32,000 employees to use a Blackberry because of security concerns.
    Nevertheless, the Commission has nothing against smartphones from Apple or HTC

    This is suprising since Apple iPhone just had another exploit in the wild reported this week. Late last year already (i.e.2009-11-19), Germany’s Ministry of the Interior urged other gov. departments and agencies neither to use smartphones from RIM (Blackberry) nor Apple’s iPhone due to security risks.

    This week (2010-08-04) it was made public that the current iOS 4.0.1 has an exploit in the wild that makes the iPod, iPhone, iPad all vulnerable to malicious PDF files.

    So while I believe secure e-mail is definitely a good thing, my concern is more about the many smartphones getting left behind in taxis and possibly getting into the wrong hands. As well, workers tweeting or e-mailing on their private smartphones and their toys being hacked should worry risk managers.

    I found particularly interesting the statement that the Opolis user sending an e-mail to another party:

    “… decides whether the recipient may copy, print, respond to or forward a message.”

    The above is interesting but everything can be copied if need be we do it the archaic way by just re-typing the text :-)

    As well, by backing up the information as the company is required by law it can still be part of the e-discovery process initiated by a court of law. u00a0All information is fully discoverable and the first place lawyers look when building a case.

    Hence, if you don’t want e-mail to be used the wrong u00a0way by the recipient, the best choice seems to neither send the information by e-mail nor using Twitter, that simple.

    Thanks for sharing and hope to get your next comment soon.

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    @opolismail

    Appreciate your comment on 2010 trends – mobile communication. But these days I am a bit less worried about e-mails that we are required to back up anyway to be able to produce them in case the court goes through an e-discovery process with us.

    This week, smartphone security risks are something I worry the most about.

    For instance, Wednesday (2010-08-04) the EU Commission announced that it does not allow its 32,000 employees to use a Blackberry because of security concerns.
    Nevertheless, the Commission has nothing against smartphones from Apple or HTC

    This is suprising since Apple iPhone just had another exploit in the wild reported this week. Late last year already (i.e.2009-11-19), Germany’s Ministry of the Interior urged other gov. departments and agencies neither to use smartphones from RIM (Blackberry) nor Apple’s iPhone due to security risks.

    This week (2010-08-04) it was made public that the current iOS 4.0.1 has an exploit in the wild that makes the iPod, iPhone, iPad all vulnerable to malicious PDF files.

    So while I believe secure e-mail is definitely a good thing, my concern is more about the many smartphones getting left behind in taxis and possibly getting into the wrong hands. As well, workers tweeting or e-mailing on their private smartphones and their toys being hacked should worry risk managers.

    I found particularly interesting the statement that the Opolis user sending an e-mail to another party:

    “… decides whether the recipient may copy, print, respond to or forward a message.”

    The above is interesting but everything can be copied if need be we do it the archaic way by just re-typing the text :-)

    As well, by backing up the information as the company is required by law it can still be part of the e-discovery process initiated by a court of law. u00a0All information is fully discoverable and the first place lawyers look when building a case.

    Hence, if you don’t want e-mail to be used the wrong u00a0way by the recipient, the best choice seems to neither send the information by e-mail nor using Twitter, that simple.

    Thanks for sharing and hope to get your next comment soon.

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    @opolismail

    Appreciate your comment on 2010 trends – mobile communication. But these days I am a bit less worried about e-mails that we are required to back up anyway to be able to produce them in case the court goes through an e-discovery process with us.

    This week, smartphone security risks are something I worry the most about.

    For instance, Wednesday (2010-08-04) the EU Commission announced that it does not allow its 32,000 employees to use a Blackberry because of security concerns.
    Nevertheless, the Commission has nothing against smartphones from Apple or HTC

    This is suprising since Apple iPhone just had another exploit in the wild reported this week. Late last year already (i.e.2009-11-19), Germany’s Ministry of the Interior urged other gov. departments and agencies neither to use smartphones from RIM (Blackberry) nor Apple’s iPhone due to security risks.

    This week (2010-08-04) it was made public that the current iOS 4.0.1 has an exploit in the wild that makes the iPod, iPhone, iPad all vulnerable to malicious PDF files.

    So while I believe secure e-mail is definitely a good thing, my concern is more about the many smartphones getting left behind in taxis and possibly getting into the wrong hands. As well, workers tweeting or e-mailing on their private smartphones and their toys being hacked should worry risk managers.

    I found particularly interesting the statement that the Opolis user sending an e-mail to another party:

    “… decides whether the recipient may copy, print, respond to or forward a message.”

    The above is interesting but everything can be copied if need be we do it the archaic way by just re-typing the text :-)

    As well, by backing up the information as the company is required by law it can still be part of the e-discovery process initiated by a court of law. u00a0All information is fully discoverable and the first place lawyers look when building a case.

    Hence, if you don’t want e-mail to be used the wrong u00a0way by the recipient, the best choice seems to neither send the information by e-mail nor using Twitter, that simple.

    Thanks for sharing and hope to get your next comment soon.

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    @opolismail

    Appreciate your comment on 2010 trends – mobile communication. But these days I am a bit less worried about e-mails that we are required to back up anyway to be able to produce them in case the court goes through an e-discovery process with us.

    This week, smartphone security risks are something I worry the most about.

    For instance, Wednesday (2010-08-04) the EU Commission announced that it does not allow its 32,000 employees to use a Blackberry because of security concerns.
    Nevertheless, the Commission has nothing against smartphones from Apple or HTC

    This is suprising since Apple iPhone just had another exploit in the wild reported this week. Late last year already (i.e.2009-11-19), Germany’s Ministry of the Interior urged other gov. departments and agencies neither to use smartphones from RIM (Blackberry) nor Apple’s iPhone due to security risks.

    This week (2010-08-04) it was made public that the current iOS 4.0.1 has an exploit in the wild that makes the iPod, iPhone, iPad all vulnerable to malicious PDF files.

    So while I believe secure e-mail is definitely a good thing, my concern is more about the many smartphones getting left behind in taxis and possibly getting into the wrong hands. As well, workers tweeting or e-mailing on their private smartphones and their toys being hacked should worry risk managers.

    I found particularly interesting the statement that the Opolis user sending an e-mail to another party:

    “… decides whether the recipient may copy, print, respond to or forward a message.”

    The above is interesting but everything can be copied if need be we do it the archaic way by just re-typing the text :-)

    As well, by backing up the information as the company is required by law it can still be part of the e-discovery process initiated by a court of law. u00a0All information is fully discoverable and the first place lawyers look when building a case.

    Hence, if you don’t want e-mail to be used the wrong u00a0way by the recipient, the best choice seems to neither send the information by e-mail nor using Twitter, that simple.

    Thanks for sharing and hope to get your next comment soon.

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    @opolismail

    Appreciate your comment on 2010 trends – mobile communication. But these days I am a bit less worried about e-mails that we are required to back up anyway to be able to produce them in case the court goes through an e-discovery process with us.

    This week, smartphone security risks are something I worry the most about.

    For instance, Wednesday (2010-08-04) the EU Commission announced that it does not allow its 32,000 employees to use a Blackberry because of security concerns.
    Nevertheless, the Commission has nothing against smartphones from Apple or HTC

    This is suprising since Apple iPhone just had another exploit in the wild reported this week. Late last year already (i.e.2009-11-19), Germany’s Ministry of the Interior urged other gov. departments and agencies neither to use smartphones from RIM (Blackberry) nor Apple’s iPhone due to security risks.

    This week (2010-08-04) it was made public that the current iOS 4.0.1 has an exploit in the wild that makes the iPod, iPhone, iPad all vulnerable to malicious PDF files.

    So while I believe secure e-mail is definitely a good thing, my concern is more about the many smartphones getting left behind in taxis and possibly getting into the wrong hands. As well, workers tweeting or e-mailing on their private smartphones and their toys being hacked should worry risk managers.

    I found particularly interesting the statement that the Opolis user sending an e-mail to another party:

    “… decides whether the recipient may copy, print, respond to or forward a message.”

    The above is interesting but everything can be copied if need be we do it the archaic way by just re-typing the text :-)

    As well, by backing up the information as the company is required by law it can still be part of the e-discovery process initiated by a court of law. u00a0All information is fully discoverable and the first place lawyers look when building a case.

    Hence, if you don’t want e-mail to be used the wrong u00a0way by the recipient, the best choice seems to neither send the information by e-mail nor using Twitter, that simple.

    Thanks for sharing and hope to get your next comment soon.

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    @opolismail

    Appreciate your comment on 2010 trends – mobile communication. But these days I am a bit less worried about e-mails that we are required to back up anyway to be able to produce them in case the court goes through an e-discovery process with us.

    This week, smartphone security risks are something I worry the most about.

    For instance, Wednesday (2010-08-04) the EU Commission announced that it does not allow its 32,000 employees to use a Blackberry because of security concerns.
    Nevertheless, the Commission has nothing against smartphones from Apple or HTC

    This is suprising since Apple iPhone just had another exploit in the wild reported this week. Late last year already (i.e.2009-11-19), Germany’s Ministry of the Interior urged other gov. departments and agencies neither to use smartphones from RIM (Blackberry) nor Apple’s iPhone due to security risks.

    This week (2010-08-04) it was made public that the current iOS 4.0.1 has an exploit in the wild that makes the iPod, iPhone, iPad all vulnerable to malicious PDF files.

    So while I believe secure e-mail is definitely a good thing, my concern is more about the many smartphones getting left behind in taxis and possibly getting into the wrong hands. As well, workers tweeting or e-mailing on their private smartphones and their toys being hacked should worry risk managers.

    I found particularly interesting the statement that the Opolis user sending an e-mail to another party:

    “… decides whether the recipient may copy, print, respond to or forward a message.”

    The above is interesting but everything can be copied if need be we do it the archaic way by just re-typing the text :-)

    As well, by backing up the information as the company is required by law it can still be part of the e-discovery process initiated by a court of law. u00a0All information is fully discoverable and the first place lawyers look when building a case.

    Hence, if you don’t want e-mail to be used the wrong u00a0way by the recipient, the best choice seems to neither send the information by e-mail nor using Twitter, that simple.

    Thanks for sharing and hope to get your next comment soon.

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    @opolismail

    Appreciate your comment on 2010 trends – mobile communication. But these days I am a bit less worried about e-mails that we are required to back up anyway to be able to produce them in case the court goes through an e-discovery process with us.

    This week, smartphone security risks are something I worry the most about.

    For instance, Wednesday (2010-08-04) the EU Commission announced that it does not allow its 32,000 employees to use a Blackberry because of security concerns.
    Nevertheless, the Commission has nothing against smartphones from Apple or HTC

    This is suprising since Apple iPhone just had another exploit in the wild reported this week. Late last year already (i.e.2009-11-19), Germany’s Ministry of the Interior urged other gov. departments and agencies neither to use smartphones from RIM (Blackberry) nor Apple’s iPhone due to security risks.

    This week (2010-08-04) it was made public that the current iOS 4.0.1 has an exploit in the wild that makes the iPod, iPhone, iPad all vulnerable to malicious PDF files.

    So while I believe secure e-mail is definitely a good thing, my concern is more about the many smartphones getting left behind in taxis and possibly getting into the wrong hands. As well, workers tweeting or e-mailing on their private smartphones and their toys being hacked should worry risk managers.

    I found particularly interesting the statement that the Opolis user sending an e-mail to another party:

    “… decides whether the recipient may copy, print, respond to or forward a message.”

    The above is interesting but everything can be copied if need be we do it the archaic way by just re-typing the text :-)

    As well, by backing up the information as the company is required by law it can still be part of the e-discovery process initiated by a court of law. u00a0All information is fully discoverable and the first place lawyers look when building a case.

    Hence, if you don’t want e-mail to be used the wrong u00a0way by the recipient, the best choice seems to neither send the information by e-mail nor using Twitter, that simple.

    Thanks for sharing and hope to get your next comment soon.

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    @opolismail

    Appreciate your comment on 2010 trends – mobile communication. But these days I am a bit less worried about e-mails that we are required to back up anyway to be able to produce them in case the court goes through an e-discovery process with us.

    This week, smartphone security risks are something I worry the most about.

    For instance, Wednesday (2010-08-04) the EU Commission announced that it does not allow its 32,000 employees to use a Blackberry because of security concerns.
    Nevertheless, the Commission has nothing against smartphones from Apple or HTC

    This is suprising since Apple iPhone just had another exploit in the wild reported this week. Late last year already (i.e.2009-11-19), Germany’s Ministry of the Interior urged other gov. departments and agencies neither to use smartphones from RIM (Blackberry) nor Apple’s iPhone due to security risks.

    This week (2010-08-04) it was made public that the current iOS 4.0.1 has an exploit in the wild that makes the iPod, iPhone, iPad all vulnerable to malicious PDF files.

    So while I believe secure e-mail is definitely a good thing, my concern is more about the many smartphones getting left behind in taxis and possibly getting into the wrong hands. As well, workers tweeting or e-mailing on their private smartphones and their toys being hacked should worry risk managers.

    I found particularly interesting the statement that the Opolis user sending an e-mail to another party:

    “… decides whether the recipient may copy, print, respond to or forward a message.”

    The above is interesting but everything can be copied if need be we do it the archaic way by just re-typing the text :-)

    As well, by backing up the information as the company is required by law it can still be part of the e-discovery process initiated by a court of law. u00a0All information is fully discoverable and the first place lawyers look when building a case.

    Hence, if you don’t want e-mail to be used the wrong u00a0way by the recipient, the best choice seems to neither send the information by e-mail nor using Twitter, that simple.

    Thanks for sharing and hope to get your next comment soon.

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    @opolismail

    Appreciate your comment on 2010 trends – mobile communication. But these days I am a bit less worried about e-mails that we are required to back up anyway to be able to produce them in case the court goes through an e-discovery process with us.

    This week, smartphone security risks are something I worry the most about.

    For instance, Wednesday (2010-08-04) the EU Commission announced that it does not allow its 32,000 employees to use a Blackberry because of security concerns.
    Nevertheless, the Commission has nothing against smartphones from Apple or HTC

    This is suprising since Apple iPhone just had another exploit in the wild reported this week. Late last year already (i.e.2009-11-19), Germany’s Ministry of the Interior urged other gov. departments and agencies neither to use smartphones from RIM (Blackberry) nor Apple’s iPhone due to security risks.

    This week (2010-08-04) it was made public that the current iOS 4.0.1 has an exploit in the wild that makes the iPod, iPhone, iPad all vulnerable to malicious PDF files.

    So while I believe secure e-mail is definitely a good thing, my concern is more about the many smartphones getting left behind in taxis and possibly getting into the wrong hands. As well, workers tweeting or e-mailing on their private smartphones and their toys being hacked should worry risk managers.

    I found particularly interesting the statement that the Opolis user sending an e-mail to another party:

    “… decides whether the recipient may copy, print, respond to or forward a message.”

    The above is interesting but everything can be copied if need be we do it the archaic way by just re-typing the text :-)

    As well, by backing up the information as the company is required by law it can still be part of the e-discovery process initiated by a court of law. u00a0All information is fully discoverable and the first place lawyers look when building a case.

    Hence, if you don’t want e-mail to be used the wrong u00a0way by the recipient, the best choice seems to neither send the information by e-mail nor using Twitter, that simple.

    Thanks for sharing and hope to get your next comment soon.

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    @opolismail

    Appreciate your comment on 2010 trends – mobile communication. But these days I am a bit less worried about e-mails that we are required to back up anyway to be able to produce them in case the court goes through an e-discovery process with us.

    This week, smartphone security risks are something I worry the most about.

    For instance, Wednesday (2010-08-04) the EU Commission announced that it does not allow its 32,000 employees to use a Blackberry because of security concerns.
    Nevertheless, the Commission has nothing against smartphones from Apple or HTC

    This is suprising since Apple iPhone just had another exploit in the wild reported this week. Late last year already (i.e.2009-11-19), Germany’s Ministry of the Interior urged other gov. departments and agencies neither to use smartphones from RIM (Blackberry) nor Apple’s iPhone due to security risks.

    This week (2010-08-04) it was made public that the current iOS 4.0.1 has an exploit in the wild that makes the iPod, iPhone, iPad all vulnerable to malicious PDF files.

    So while I believe secure e-mail is definitely a good thing, my concern is more about the many smartphones getting left behind in taxis and possibly getting into the wrong hands. As well, workers tweeting or e-mailing on their private smartphones and their toys being hacked should worry risk managers.

    I found particularly interesting the statement that the Opolis user sending an e-mail to another party:

    “… decides whether the recipient may copy, print, respond to or forward a message.”

    The above is interesting but everything can be copied if need be we do it the archaic way by just re-typing the text :-)

    As well, by backing up the information as the company is required by law it can still be part of the e-discovery process initiated by a court of law. u00a0All information is fully discoverable and the first place lawyers look when building a case.

    Hence, if you don’t want e-mail to be used the wrong u00a0way by the recipient, the best choice seems to neither send the information by e-mail nor using Twitter, that simple.

    Thanks for sharing and hope to get your next comment soon.

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    @opolismail

    Appreciate your comment on 2010 trends – mobile communication. But these days I am a bit less worried about e-mails that we are required to back up anyway to be able to produce them in case the court goes through an e-discovery process with us.

    This week, smartphone security risks are something I worry the most about.

    For instance, Wednesday (2010-08-04) the EU Commission announced that it does not allow its 32,000 employees to use a Blackberry because of security concerns.
    Nevertheless, the Commission has nothing against smartphones from Apple or HTC

    This is suprising since Apple iPhone just had another exploit in the wild reported this week. Late last year already (i.e.2009-11-19), Germany’s Ministry of the Interior urged other gov. departments and agencies neither to use smartphones from RIM (Blackberry) nor Apple’s iPhone due to security risks.

    This week (2010-08-04) it was made public that the current iOS 4.0.1 has an exploit in the wild that makes the iPod, iPhone, iPad all vulnerable to malicious PDF files.

    So while I believe secure e-mail is definitely a good thing, my concern is more about the many smartphones getting left behind in taxis and possibly getting into the wrong hands. As well, workers tweeting or e-mailing on their private smartphones and their toys being hacked should worry risk managers.

    I found particularly interesting the statement that the Opolis user sending an e-mail to another party:

    “… decides whether the recipient may copy, print, respond to or forward a message.”

    The above is interesting but everything can be copied if need be we do it the archaic way by just re-typing the text :-)

    As well, by backing up the information as the company is required by law it can still be part of the e-discovery process initiated by a court of law. u00a0All information is fully discoverable and the first place lawyers look when building a case.

    Hence, if you don’t want e-mail to be used the wrong u00a0way by the recipient, the best choice seems to neither send the information by e-mail nor using Twitter, that simple.

    Thanks for sharing and hope to get your next comment soon.

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    @opolismail

    Appreciate your comment on 2010 trends – mobile communication. But these days I am a bit less worried about e-mails that we are required to back up anyway to be able to produce them in case the court goes through an e-discovery process with us.

    This week, smartphone security risks are something I worry the most about.

    For instance, Wednesday (2010-08-04) the EU Commission announced that it does not allow its 32,000 employees to use a Blackberry because of security concerns.
    Nevertheless, the Commission has nothing against smartphones from Apple or HTC

    This is suprising since Apple iPhone just had another exploit in the wild reported this week. Late last year already (i.e.2009-11-19), Germany’s Ministry of the Interior urged other gov. departments and agencies neither to use smartphones from RIM (Blackberry) nor Apple’s iPhone due to security risks.

    This week (2010-08-04) it was made public that the current iOS 4.0.1 has an exploit in the wild that makes the iPod, iPhone, iPad all vulnerable to malicious PDF files.

    So while I believe secure e-mail is definitely a good thing, my concern is more about the many smartphones getting left behind in taxis and possibly getting into the wrong hands. As well, workers tweeting or e-mailing on their private smartphones and their toys being hacked should worry risk managers.

    I found particularly interesting the statement that the Opolis user sending an e-mail to another party:

    “… decides whether the recipient may copy, print, respond to or forward a message.”

    The above is interesting but everything can be copied if need be we do it the archaic way by just re-typing the text :-)

    As well, by backing up the information as the company is required by law it can still be part of the e-discovery process initiated by a court of law. u00a0All information is fully discoverable and the first place lawyers look when building a case.

    Hence, if you don’t want e-mail to be used the wrong u00a0way by the recipient, the best choice seems to neither send the information by e-mail nor using Twitter, that simple.

    Thanks for sharing and hope to get your next comment soon.

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    @opolismail

    Appreciate your comment on 2010 trends – mobile communication. But these days I am a bit less worried about e-mails that we are required to back up anyway to be able to produce them in case the court goes through an e-discovery process with us.

    This week, smartphone security risks are something I worry the most about.

    For instance, Wednesday (2010-08-04) the EU Commission announced that it does not allow its 32,000 employees to use a Blackberry because of security concerns.
    Nevertheless, the Commission has nothing against smartphones from Apple or HTC

    This is suprising since Apple iPhone just had another exploit in the wild reported this week. Late last year already (i.e.2009-11-19), Germany’s Ministry of the Interior urged other gov. departments and agencies neither to use smartphones from RIM (Blackberry) nor Apple’s iPhone due to security risks.

    This week (2010-08-04) it was made public that the current iOS 4.0.1 has an exploit in the wild that makes the iPod, iPhone, iPad all vulnerable to malicious PDF files.

    So while I believe secure e-mail is definitely a good thing, my concern is more about the many smartphones getting left behind in taxis and possibly getting into the wrong hands. As well, workers tweeting or e-mailing on their private smartphones and their toys being hacked should worry risk managers.

    I found particularly interesting the statement that the Opolis user sending an e-mail to another party:

    “… decides whether the recipient may copy, print, respond to or forward a message.”

    The above is interesting but everything can be copied if need be we do it the archaic way by just re-typing the text :-)

    As well, by backing up the information as the company is required by law it can still be part of the e-discovery process initiated by a court of law. u00a0All information is fully discoverable and the first place lawyers look when building a case.

    Hence, if you don’t want e-mail to be used the wrong u00a0way by the recipient, the best choice seems to neither send the information by e-mail nor using Twitter, that simple.

    Thanks for sharing and hope to get your next comment soon.

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    @opolismail

    Appreciate your comment on 2010 trends – mobile communication. But these days I am a bit less worried about e-mails that we are required to back up anyway to be able to produce them in case the court goes through an e-discovery process with us.

    This week, smartphone security risks are something I worry the most about.

    For instance, Wednesday (2010-08-04) the EU Commission announced that it does not allow its 32,000 employees to use a Blackberry because of security concerns.
    Nevertheless, the Commission has nothing against smartphones from Apple or HTC

    This is suprising since Apple iPhone just had another exploit in the wild reported this week. Late last year already (i.e.2009-11-19), Germany’s Ministry of the Interior urged other gov. departments and agencies neither to use smartphones from RIM (Blackberry) nor Apple’s iPhone due to security risks.

    This week (2010-08-04) it was made public that the current iOS 4.0.1 has an exploit in the wild that makes the iPod, iPhone, iPad all vulnerable to malicious PDF files.

    So while I believe secure e-mail is definitely a good thing, my concern is more about the many smartphones getting left behind in taxis and possibly getting into the wrong hands. As well, workers tweeting or e-mailing on their private smartphones and their toys being hacked should worry risk managers.

    I found particularly interesting the statement that the Opolis user sending an e-mail to another party:

    “… decides whether the recipient may copy, print, respond to or forward a message.”

    The above is interesting but everything can be copied if need be we do it the archaic way by just re-typing the text :-)

    As well, by backing up the information as the company is required by law it can still be part of the e-discovery process initiated by a court of law. u00a0All information is fully discoverable and the first place lawyers look when building a case.

    Hence, if you don’t want e-mail to be used the wrong u00a0way by the recipient, the best choice seems to neither send the information by e-mail nor using Twitter, that simple.

    Thanks for sharing and hope to get your next comment soon.

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    @opolismail

    Appreciate your comment on 2010 trends – mobile communication. But these days I am a bit less worried about e-mails that we are required to back up anyway to be able to produce them in case the court goes through an e-discovery process with us.

    This week, smartphone security risks are something I worry the most about.

    For instance, Wednesday (2010-08-04) the EU Commission announced that it does not allow its 32,000 employees to use a Blackberry because of security concerns.
    Nevertheless, the Commission has nothing against smartphones from Apple or HTC

    This is suprising since Apple iPhone just had another exploit in the wild reported this week. Late last year already (i.e.2009-11-19), Germany’s Ministry of the Interior urged other gov. departments and agencies neither to use smartphones from RIM (Blackberry) nor Apple’s iPhone due to security risks.

    This week (2010-08-04) it was made public that the current iOS 4.0.1 has an exploit in the wild that makes the iPod, iPhone, iPad all vulnerable to malicious PDF files.

    So while I believe secure e-mail is definitely a good thing, my concern is more about the many smartphones getting left behind in taxis and possibly getting into the wrong hands. As well, workers tweeting or e-mailing on their private smartphones and their toys being hacked should worry risk managers.

    I found particularly interesting the statement that the Opolis user sending an e-mail to another party:

    “… decides whether the recipient may copy, print, respond to or forward a message.”

    The above is interesting but everything can be copied if need be we do it the archaic way by just re-typing the text :-)

    As well, by backing up the information as the company is required by law it can still be part of the e-discovery process initiated by a court of law. u00a0All information is fully discoverable and the first place lawyers look when building a case.

    Hence, if you don’t want e-mail to be used the wrong u00a0way by the recipient, the best choice seems to neither send the information by e-mail nor using Twitter, that simple.

    Thanks for sharing and hope to get your next comment soon.

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    @opolismailAppreciate your comment on 2010 trends – mobile communication. But these days I am a bit less worried about e-mails. We are required to back these up anyway to be able to produce them in case the court goes through an e-discovery process with us.This week, smartphone security risks are something I worry the most about.For instance, Wednesday (2010-08-04) the EU Commission announced that it does not allow its 32,000 employees to use a Blackberry because of security concerns.Nevertheless, the Commission has nothing against smartphones from Apple or HTCThis is suprising since the Apple iPhone just had another exploit in the wild reported this week. Late last year (i.e.2009-11-19), Germany's Ministry of the Interior urged other gov. departments and agencies neither to use smartphones from RIM (Blackberry) nor Apple's iPhone due to security risks.This week (2010-08-04) it was made public that the current iOS 4.0.1 has an exploit in the wild that makes the iPod, iPhone, iPad all vulnerable to malicious PDF files.So while I believe secure e-mail is definitely a good thing, my concern is more about the many smartphones getting left behind in taxis and possibly getting into the wrong hands. As well, workers tweeting or e-mailing on their private smartphones and their toys being hacked should worry corporate risk managers.I found particularly interesting the statement that the Opolis user sending an e-mail to another party:”… decides whether the recipient may copy, print, respond to or forward a message.”I hope you agree with me though that everything can be copied. If need be we do it the old-fashioned way by re-typing the text :-)As well, most countries’ regulators require that e-mail can be produced during the e-discovery process.  
    All information is fully discoverable. Hence, private as well as corporate smartphones are the first place lawyers look when building a case.Hence, if you don't want e-mail to be used the wrong  way by the recipient, the best choice seems to neither send the information by e-mail nor using Twitter, that simple.
    Thanks for sharing and hope I can read your next comment on one of our blog posts soon.

  • Akalya Npt

    ya it s very useful 

    • http://info.cytrap.eu/articles/social-media-marketing-fur-den-kmu Urs E. Gattiker

      @d927f714414606b40c7edf2e501b2269:disqus thanks for stopping by and commenting.  Have you commented/participated in our 2012 poll yet?

      ComMetrics poll: 2012 social media marketing trends

      By the way, we have another prediction coming up for Google Plus, Mobile and so forth in the next few weeks on this blog.  Better subscribe with your e-mail to get it for sure…. in your in box.

      I hope you will comment again soon Akalya. Merci.

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