Building a social networking reputation: 4 golden rules

by Urs E. Gattiker on 2010/05/19 · 41 comments 13,774 views

in a analytics taking action,e marketing 101 style matters

In my blog post Why social networking groups fail, I wrote about four rules a group moderator should follow to facilitate engagement and provide greater benefits to members:

    1. Provide structure and focus.
    2. Support and nurture.
    3. Share the gardening duties.
    4. Continuity is king.

But what about you, are you effective as a group member on any of your Facebook, LinkedIn, Biznik, Xing or other groups?

Have you succeeded in building your reputation through these networks?

If you want to know more, we outline four tips that will help improve your experience below.

    Tip 1 – Be a good listener

With all the chatter on various social media channels and other noise, we may no longer grasp the meaning of what is being said or written.

Listening means that we read the responses to questions we pose in forums, instead of abandoning them like orphans due to lack of time to read responses, or worse, not expending the energy to compose a thoughtful reply.

Successful social networkers make the time to monitor groups of which they are members to stay informed. We all want people to listen when we talk and acknowledge the intelligent things we have to say. But do we listen in return?

My advice: In order to participate successfully, it is necessary to spend time reading about group activities on a daily basis. Failing to do so results in failing to reach the first milestone to making group membership beneficial.

    Tip 2 – Be an active listener

Reading other people’s contribution carefully is a first step to becoming an effective group member. But people want to be acknowledged for their thoughts and insights left on various forums or discussion threads in a group.

Image - graphic - US poster - And so, my fellow group members: ask not what your group can do for you, ask what you can do for your group - Xing, LinkedIn, Facebook groups.Accordingly, responding to a comment someone left in response to a question you posted is wise.

Successful networkers manage their memberships in virtual groups on social networks in such a way that they can spare the time to participate in discussions. Participation can happen in many ways but it requires responding to replies posted to one’s question or replying to other people’s questions.

Participating also means visibility, but as importantly, it gives others an opportunity to develop some level of trust in the quality, depth and tone of your responses.

My advice: Active listening means one regularly contributes by writing a comment to other people’s questions and contributions or threads started in a group.

See also ComMetrics – Engaging comments: Where is the beef?

    Tip 3 – Make sure others feel comfortable

Commenting and contributing your insights puts you in front of an audience. This allows members to get to know you better as a first step toward increasing trust. It also means gaining recognition and improving one’s reputation as a member of the community. But more is needed.

For instance, Queen Victoria is famously said to have drunk the water in her finger bowl. She had no choice: her guest, the Shah of Persia, did so first.

Correct etiquette, also known as good manners, is all about making other people feel comfortable.” People must feel wanted and appreciated to open up and engage.

In turn, engagement champions are the people that welcome others as new members, write a response when nobody dares to or provide support in many other ways such as taking a phone call and giving free advice if asked.

My advice: Make a special effort to ensure other group members feel appreciated and comfortable. Acknowledge other people’s contributions by replying to their comments and keeping them engaged.

See also ComMetrics – Making sure the source is trustworthy: Facebook, Twitter, Xing, LinkedIn

    Tip 4 – Be sure to keep your contenance

C’est le ton quit fait la musique, is a nice, French way of saying, it is not what you say, but how you say it. Finding the right tone while never losing one’s temper while responding in writing is a true challenge.

Ensuring someone does not feel they are being talked down to or misunderstood is something that effective group members seem to master better than most of us.

My advice: Successful networkers make an effort to stay polite and give others a chance to appreciate, if not like, them.

Take-aways
Following the above suggestions and exhibiting similar characteristics in our networking lives means being liked, and if you are liked you can be more effective.

    1. Out of nothing comes nothing: Participating means posting an answer to somebody’s question or adding your thoughts to their comment. In turn, people recognize you, read your input, start trusting your assessments and, as importantly, provide you with feedback and additional insights by commenting on your stuff.
    2. A fine red wine takes a few years to mature: Being acknowledged or recognized as an expert in a group will take time. So you need to contribute twice a week on different days for several months before thinking about reaping the rewards. By the way, if twice weekly is too much, prune your group memberships now.

What is your take? How do you see these issues? Have you tried to apply any of these approaches for your group memberships? Worked, failed – share, please! Please let us know in the comments!

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Article source: ComMetrics – Building a social networking reputation: 4 golden rules

This blog post is related to our webinar held on Wednesday 2010-05-19 ComMetrics University – Building one’s reputation on social networks.

Upcoming webinar:

Attend our webinars by registering for ComMetrics University – we help you improve your social media performance faster.

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  • http://www.ifb-loewenmut.de Stan Albers

    Thanks for this week´s input at your webinar! I learned that I am a member in far too much XING groups and will use the days off ahead to do some tidying up.

    • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

      Dear Stan

      Thanks for this feedback:

      All media including Xing groups depends on the minds of the people who use it, and often we discover that because we are in too many groups not giving them the time to:

      a) read what they link to or got in their e-mail/RSS feed from a group on LinkedIn,
      b) do not understand what they read, or
      c) don’t really care and just like pushing bits around (i.e. post a reply or tweet about it).

      So pruning the garden helps one focus and, in turn, probably get much more out of a group compared to being a member in too many.

      Have a great weekend and thanks for sharing.

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  • http://seop.myplaxo.com SEOP

    Thanks for these tips!

    • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

      Thanks for the feedback. I love to hear from you what you applied and how it worked for you.

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  • http://eric-mariacher.blogspot.com/2006/05/my-2-cents-about-online-business.html Eric Mariacher

    Here are my own advices:nnGrow your network while you don’t need itnn1st advice “Grow your network while you don’t need it”n2nd advice “know why you want to network”n3rd advice “get recommendations from current and past colleagues posted on your profile”n4th advice “make heavy use of the Q&A feature (on LinkedIn) or post on forums”n5th advice “never use standard boiler plate templates” when inviting people to connectn6th advice/fact “The more connections you have, the more time you must spend”n7th advice “join yahoo networking groups. You will learn a lot”n8th advice “Read other 2 cents advices”n9th advice “Do not forget other ways of networking”nnread more in details: http://eric-mariacher.blogspot.com/2006/05/my-2-cents-about-online-business.htmln

  • http://eric-mariacher.blogspot.com/2006/05/my-2-cents-about-online-business.html Eric Mariacher

    Here are my own advices:nnGrow your network while you don’t need itnn1st advice “Grow your network while you don’t need it”n2nd advice “know why you want to network”n3rd advice “get recommendations from current and past colleagues posted on your profile”n4th advice “make heavy use of the Q&A feature (on LinkedIn) or post on forums”n5th advice “never use standard boiler plate templates” when inviting people to connectn6th advice/fact “The more connections you have, the more time you must spend”n7th advice “join yahoo networking groups. You will learn a lot”n8th advice “Read other 2 cents advices”n9th advice “Do not forget other ways of networking”nnread more in details: http://eric-mariacher.blogspot.com/2006/05/my-2-cents-about-online-business.htmln

  • http://eric-mariacher.blogspot.com/2006/05/my-2-cents-about-online-business.html Eric Mariacher

    Here are my own advices:nnGrow your network while you don’t need itnn1st advice “Grow your network while you don’t need it”n2nd advice “know why you want to network”n3rd advice “get recommendations from current and past colleagues posted on your profile”n4th advice “make heavy use of the Q&A feature (on LinkedIn) or post on forums”n5th advice “never use standard boiler plate templates” when inviting people to connectn6th advice/fact “The more connections you have, the more time you must spend”n7th advice “join yahoo networking groups. You will learn a lot”n8th advice “Read other 2 cents advices”n9th advice “Do not forget other ways of networking”nnread more in details: http://eric-mariacher.blogspot.com/2006/05/my-2-cents-about-online-business.htmln

  • http://eric-mariacher.blogspot.com/2006/05/my-2-cents-about-online-business.html Eric Mariacher

    Here are my own advices:nnGrow your network while you don’t need itnn1st advice “Grow your network while you don’t need it”n2nd advice “know why you want to network”n3rd advice “get recommendations from current and past colleagues posted on your profile”n4th advice “make heavy use of the Q&A feature (on LinkedIn) or post on forums”n5th advice “never use standard boiler plate templates” when inviting people to connectn6th advice/fact “The more connections you have, the more time you must spend”n7th advice “join yahoo networking groups. You will learn a lot”n8th advice “Read other 2 cents advices”n9th advice “Do not forget other ways of networking”nnread more in details: http://eric-mariacher.blogspot.com/2006/05/my-2-cents-about-online-business.htmln

  • http://eric-mariacher.blogspot.com/2006/05/my-2-cents-about-online-business.html Eric Mariacher

    Here are my own advices:nnGrow your network while you don’t need itnn1st advice “Grow your network while you don’t need it”n2nd advice “know why you want to network”n3rd advice “get recommendations from current and past colleagues posted on your profile”n4th advice “make heavy use of the Q&A feature (on LinkedIn) or post on forums”n5th advice “never use standard boiler plate templates” when inviting people to connectn6th advice/fact “The more connections you have, the more time you must spend”n7th advice “join yahoo networking groups. You will learn a lot”n8th advice “Read other 2 cents advices”n9th advice “Do not forget other ways of networking”nnread more in details: http://eric-mariacher.blogspot.com/2006/05/my-2-cents-about-online-business.htmln

  • http://eric-mariacher.blogspot.com/2006/05/my-2-cents-about-online-business.html Eric Mariacher

    Here are my own advices:nnGrow your network while you don’t need itnn1st advice “Grow your network while you don’t need it”n2nd advice “know why you want to network”n3rd advice “get recommendations from current and past colleagues posted on your profile”n4th advice “make heavy use of the Q&A feature (on LinkedIn) or post on forums”n5th advice “never use standard boiler plate templates” when inviting people to connectn6th advice/fact “The more connections you have, the more time you must spend”n7th advice “join yahoo networking groups. You will learn a lot”n8th advice “Read other 2 cents advices”n9th advice “Do not forget other ways of networking”nnread more in details: http://eric-mariacher.blogspot.com/2006/05/my-2-cents-about-online-business.htmln

  • http://eric-mariacher.blogspot.com/2006/05/my-2-cents-about-online-business.html Eric Mariacher

    Here are my own advices:nnGrow your network while you don’t need itnn1st advice “Grow your network while you don’t need it”n2nd advice “know why you want to network”n3rd advice “get recommendations from current and past colleagues posted on your profile”n4th advice “make heavy use of the Q&A feature (on LinkedIn) or post on forums”n5th advice “never use standard boiler plate templates” when inviting people to connectn6th advice/fact “The more connections you have, the more time you must spend”n7th advice “join yahoo networking groups. You will learn a lot”n8th advice “Read other 2 cents advices”n9th advice “Do not forget other ways of networking”nnread more in details: http://eric-mariacher.blogspot.com/2006/05/my-2-cents-about-online-business.htmln

  • http://eric-mariacher.blogspot.com/2006/05/my-2-cents-about-online-business.html Eric Mariacher

    Here are my own advices:nnGrow your network while you don’t need itnn1st advice “Grow your network while you don’t need it”n2nd advice “know why you want to network”n3rd advice “get recommendations from current and past colleagues posted on your profile”n4th advice “make heavy use of the Q&A feature (on LinkedIn) or post on forums”n5th advice “never use standard boiler plate templates” when inviting people to connectn6th advice/fact “The more connections you have, the more time you must spend”n7th advice “join yahoo networking groups. You will learn a lot”n8th advice “Read other 2 cents advices”n9th advice “Do not forget other ways of networking”nnread more in details: http://eric-mariacher.blogspot.com/2006/05/my-2-cents-about-online-business.htmln

  • http://eric-mariacher.blogspot.com/2006/05/my-2-cents-about-online-business.html Eric Mariacher

    Here are my own advices:nnGrow your network while you don’t need itnn1st advice “Grow your network while you don’t need it”n2nd advice “know why you want to network”n3rd advice “get recommendations from current and past colleagues posted on your profile”n4th advice “make heavy use of the Q&A feature (on LinkedIn) or post on forums”n5th advice “never use standard boiler plate templates” when inviting people to connectn6th advice/fact “The more connections you have, the more time you must spend”n7th advice “join yahoo networking groups. You will learn a lot”n8th advice “Read other 2 cents advices”n9th advice “Do not forget other ways of networking”nnread more in details: http://eric-mariacher.blogspot.com/2006/05/my-2-cents-about-online-business.htmln

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    Dear EricnnThanks so much for your comment. Interesting suggestions you are making. Although after having read your comment twice to make sure, I feel it may apply to how to network but not specifically to how to build your reputation besides maybe point 4 below (see my comment about it).nnI tried to go through your suggstions point-by-point belownnGENERALITIES (no comment from me – these seem obvious and do not need an explanation)n1st advice “Grow your network while you don’t need it”n2nd advice “know why you want to network”n5th advice “never use standard boiler plate templates” when inviting people to connectn6th advice/fact “The more connections you have, the more time you must spend”nnBesides the above 5 there are another 4 that I want to address.nn4th advice “make heavy use of the Q&A feature (on LinkedIn) or post on forums”n Yes but maybe you may want to advice people that one should post Q&A that are in one’s area of expertise. Of course, the same applies to group forums… Otherwise one might not help one’s reputation but harm it instead.nn7th advice “join yahoo networking groups. You will learn a lot”n This makes no sense to me. Why Yahoo groups and not Xing or Google groups….nWould you not agree that unless one has the time to participate in a group, one should not do it. In fact, most of us are member of far too many groups.nOne might want to join a group or a forum to learn more about a topic. However, it is better to join and then start participating after a while. How else will you get in front of an audience? So to improve one’s reputation, one must participate. Besides that being a lurker does not help improve one’s reputation, you might also be considered a free-rider and, thereby hurt your reputation. I discussed this with tips and tricks here:n===>> Why social networking groups failnnThe two points below I am not sure where I should categorize them looking at the above two groups so I left them by themselves.nn8th advice “Read other 2 cents advices”n9th advice “Do not forget other ways of networking”nnFinally

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    Dear EricnnThanks so much for your comment. Interesting suggestions you are making. Although after having read your comment twice to make sure, I feel it may apply to how to network but not specifically to how to build your reputation besides maybe point 4 below (see my comment about it).nnI tried to go through your suggstions point-by-point belownnGENERALITIES (no comment from me – these seem obvious and do not need an explanation)n1st advice “Grow your network while you don’t need it”n2nd advice “know why you want to network”n5th advice “never use standard boiler plate templates” when inviting people to connectn6th advice/fact “The more connections you have, the more time you must spend”nnBesides the above 5 there are another 4 that I want to address.nn4th advice “make heavy use of the Q&A feature (on LinkedIn) or post on forums”n Yes but maybe you may want to advice people that one should post Q&A that are in one’s area of expertise. Of course, the same applies to group forums… Otherwise one might not help one’s reputation but harm it instead.nn7th advice “join yahoo networking groups. You will learn a lot”n This makes no sense to me. Why Yahoo groups and not Xing or Google groups….nWould you not agree that unless one has the time to participate in a group, one should not do it. In fact, most of us are member of far too many groups.nOne might want to join a group or a forum to learn more about a topic. However, it is better to join and then start participating after a while. How else will you get in front of an audience? So to improve one’s reputation, one must participate. Besides that being a lurker does not help improve one’s reputation, you might also be considered a free-rider and, thereby hurt your reputation. I discussed this with tips and tricks here:n===>> Why social networking groups failnnThe two points below I am not sure where I should categorize them looking at the above two groups so I left them by themselves.nn8th advice “Read other 2 cents advices”n9th advice “Do not forget other ways of networking”nnFinally

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    Dear EricnnThanks so much for your comment. Interesting suggestions you are making. Although after having read your comment twice to make sure, I feel it may apply to how to network but not specifically to how to build your reputation besides maybe point 4 below (see my comment about it).nnI tried to go through your suggstions point-by-point belownnGENERALITIES (no comment from me – these seem obvious and do not need an explanation)n1st advice “Grow your network while you don’t need it”n2nd advice “know why you want to network”n5th advice “never use standard boiler plate templates” when inviting people to connectn6th advice/fact “The more connections you have, the more time you must spend”nnBesides the above 5 there are another 4 that I want to address.nn4th advice “make heavy use of the Q&A feature (on LinkedIn) or post on forums”n Yes but maybe you may want to advice people that one should post Q&A that are in one’s area of expertise. Of course, the same applies to group forums… Otherwise one might not help one’s reputation but harm it instead.nn7th advice “join yahoo networking groups. You will learn a lot”n This makes no sense to me. Why Yahoo groups and not Xing or Google groups….nWould you not agree that unless one has the time to participate in a group, one should not do it. In fact, most of us are member of far too many groups.nOne might want to join a group or a forum to learn more about a topic. However, it is better to join and then start participating after a while. How else will you get in front of an audience? So to improve one’s reputation, one must participate. Besides that being a lurker does not help improve one’s reputation, you might also be considered a free-rider and, thereby hurt your reputation. I discussed this with tips and tricks here:n===>> Why social networking groups failnnThe two points below I am not sure where I should categorize them looking at the above two groups so I left them by themselves.nn8th advice “Read other 2 cents advices”n9th advice “Do not forget other ways of networking”nnFinally

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    Dear EricnnThanks so much for your comment. Interesting suggestions you are making. Although after having read your comment twice to make sure, I feel it may apply to how to network but not specifically to how to build your reputation besides maybe point 4 below (see my comment about it).nnI tried to go through your suggstions point-by-point belownnGENERALITIES (no comment from me – these seem obvious and do not need an explanation)n1st advice “Grow your network while you don’t need it”n2nd advice “know why you want to network”n5th advice “never use standard boiler plate templates” when inviting people to connectn6th advice/fact “The more connections you have, the more time you must spend”nnBesides the above 5 there are another 4 that I want to address.nn4th advice “make heavy use of the Q&A feature (on LinkedIn) or post on forums”n Yes but maybe you may want to advice people that one should post Q&A that are in one’s area of expertise. Of course, the same applies to group forums… Otherwise one might not help one’s reputation but harm it instead.nn7th advice “join yahoo networking groups. You will learn a lot”n This makes no sense to me. Why Yahoo groups and not Xing or Google groups….nWould you not agree that unless one has the time to participate in a group, one should not do it. In fact, most of us are member of far too many groups.nOne might want to join a group or a forum to learn more about a topic. However, it is better to join and then start participating after a while. How else will you get in front of an audience? So to improve one’s reputation, one must participate. Besides that being a lurker does not help improve one’s reputation, you might also be considered a free-rider and, thereby hurt your reputation. I discussed this with tips and tricks here:n===>> Why social networking groups failnnThe two points below I am not sure where I should categorize them looking at the above two groups so I left them by themselves.nn8th advice “Read other 2 cents advices”n9th advice “Do not forget other ways of networking”nnFinally

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    Dear EricnnThanks so much for your comment. Interesting suggestions you are making. Although after having read your comment twice to make sure, I feel it may apply to how to network but not specifically to how to build your reputation besides maybe point 4 below (see my comment about it).nnI tried to go through your suggstions point-by-point belownnGENERALITIES (no comment from me – these seem obvious and do not need an explanation)n1st advice “Grow your network while you don’t need it”n2nd advice “know why you want to network”n5th advice “never use standard boiler plate templates” when inviting people to connectn6th advice/fact “The more connections you have, the more time you must spend”nnBesides the above 5 there are another 4 that I want to address.nn4th advice “make heavy use of the Q&A feature (on LinkedIn) or post on forums”n Yes but maybe you may want to advice people that one should post Q&A that are in one’s area of expertise. Of course, the same applies to group forums… Otherwise one might not help one’s reputation but harm it instead.nn7th advice “join yahoo networking groups. You will learn a lot”n This makes no sense to me. Why Yahoo groups and not Xing or Google groups….nWould you not agree that unless one has the time to participate in a group, one should not do it. In fact, most of us are member of far too many groups.nOne might want to join a group or a forum to learn more about a topic. However, it is better to join and then start participating after a while. How else will you get in front of an audience? So to improve one’s reputation, one must participate. Besides that being a lurker does not help improve one’s reputation, you might also be considered a free-rider and, thereby hurt your reputation. I discussed this with tips and tricks here:n===>> Why social networking groups failnnThe two points below I am not sure where I should categorize them looking at the above two groups so I left them by themselves.nn8th advice “Read other 2 cents advices”n9th advice “Do not forget other ways of networking”nnFinally

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    Dear EricnnThanks so much for your comment. Interesting suggestions you are making. Although after having read your comment twice to make sure, I feel it may apply to how to network but not specifically to how to build your reputation besides maybe point 4 below (see my comment about it).nnI tried to go through your suggstions point-by-point belownnGENERALITIES (no comment from me – these seem obvious and do not need an explanation)n1st advice “Grow your network while you don’t need it”n2nd advice “know why you want to network”n5th advice “never use standard boiler plate templates” when inviting people to connectn6th advice/fact “The more connections you have, the more time you must spend”nnBesides the above 5 there are another 4 that I want to address.nn4th advice “make heavy use of the Q&A feature (on LinkedIn) or post on forums”n Yes but maybe you may want to advice people that one should post Q&A that are in one’s area of expertise. Of course, the same applies to group forums… Otherwise one might not help one’s reputation but harm it instead.nn7th advice “join yahoo networking groups. You will learn a lot”n This makes no sense to me. Why Yahoo groups and not Xing or Google groups….nWould you not agree that unless one has the time to participate in a group, one should not do it. In fact, most of us are member of far too many groups.nOne might want to join a group or a forum to learn more about a topic. However, it is better to join and then start participating after a while. How else will you get in front of an audience? So to improve one’s reputation, one must participate. Besides that being a lurker does not help improve one’s reputation, you might also be considered a free-rider and, thereby hurt your reputation. I discussed this with tips and tricks here:n===>> Why social networking groups failnnThe two points below I am not sure where I should categorize them looking at the above two groups so I left them by themselves.nn8th advice “Read other 2 cents advices”n9th advice “Do not forget other ways of networking”nnFinally

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    Dear EricnnThanks so much for your comment. Interesting suggestions you are making. Although after having read your comment twice to make sure, I feel it may apply to how to network but not specifically to how to build your reputation besides maybe point 4 below (see my comment about it).nnI tried to go through your suggstions point-by-point belownnGENERALITIES (no comment from me – these seem obvious and do not need an explanation)n1st advice “Grow your network while you don’t need it”n2nd advice “know why you want to network”n5th advice “never use standard boiler plate templates” when inviting people to connectn6th advice/fact “The more connections you have, the more time you must spend”nnBesides the above 5 there are another 4 that I want to address.nn4th advice “make heavy use of the Q&A feature (on LinkedIn) or post on forums”n Yes but maybe you may want to advice people that one should post Q&A that are in one’s area of expertise. Of course, the same applies to group forums… Otherwise one might not help one’s reputation but harm it instead.nn7th advice “join yahoo networking groups. You will learn a lot”n This makes no sense to me. Why Yahoo groups and not Xing or Google groups….nWould you not agree that unless one has the time to participate in a group, one should not do it. In fact, most of us are member of far too many groups.nOne might want to join a group or a forum to learn more about a topic. However, it is better to join and then start participating after a while. How else will you get in front of an audience? So to improve one’s reputation, one must participate. Besides that being a lurker does not help improve one’s reputation, you might also be considered a free-rider and, thereby hurt your reputation. I discussed this with tips and tricks here:n===>> Why social networking groups failnnThe two points below I am not sure where I should categorize them looking at the above two groups so I left them by themselves.nn8th advice “Read other 2 cents advices”n9th advice “Do not forget other ways of networking”nnFinally

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    Dear EricnnThanks so much for your comment. Interesting suggestions you are making. Although after having read your comment twice to make sure, I feel it may apply to how to network but not specifically to how to build your reputation besides maybe point 4 below (see my comment about it).nnI tried to go through your suggstions point-by-point belownnGENERALITIES (no comment from me – these seem obvious and do not need an explanation)n1st advice “Grow your network while you don’t need it”n2nd advice “know why you want to network”n5th advice “never use standard boiler plate templates” when inviting people to connectn6th advice/fact “The more connections you have, the more time you must spend”nnBesides the above 5 there are another 4 that I want to address.nn4th advice “make heavy use of the Q&A feature (on LinkedIn) or post on forums”n Yes but maybe you may want to advice people that one should post Q&A that are in one’s area of expertise. Of course, the same applies to group forums… Otherwise one might not help one’s reputation but harm it instead.nn7th advice “join yahoo networking groups. You will learn a lot”n This makes no sense to me. Why Yahoo groups and not Xing or Google groups….nWould you not agree that unless one has the time to participate in a group, one should not do it. In fact, most of us are member of far too many groups.nOne might want to join a group or a forum to learn more about a topic. However, it is better to join and then start participating after a while. How else will you get in front of an audience? So to improve one’s reputation, one must participate. Besides that being a lurker does not help improve one’s reputation, you might also be considered a free-rider and, thereby hurt your reputation. I discussed this with tips and tricks here:n===>> Why social networking groups failnnThe two points below I am not sure where I should categorize them looking at the above two groups so I left them by themselves.nn8th advice “Read other 2 cents advices”n9th advice “Do not forget other ways of networking”nnFinally

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    Dear EricnnThanks so much for your comment. Interesting suggestions you are making. Although after having read your comment twice to make sure, I feel it may apply to how to network but not specifically to how to build your reputation besides maybe point 4 below (see my comment about it).nnI tried to go through your suggstions point-by-point belownnGENERALITIES (no comment from me – these seem obvious and do not need an explanation)n1st advice “Grow your network while you don’t need it”n2nd advice “know why you want to network”n5th advice “never use standard boiler plate templates” when inviting people to connectn6th advice/fact “The more connections you have, the more time you must spend”nnBesides the above 5 there are another 4 that I want to address.nn4th advice “make heavy use of the Q&A feature (on LinkedIn) or post on forums”n Yes but maybe you may want to advice people that one should post Q&A that are in one’s area of expertise. Of course, the same applies to group forums… Otherwise one might not help one’s reputation but harm it instead.nn7th advice “join yahoo networking groups. You will learn a lot”n This makes no sense to me. Why Yahoo groups and not Xing or Google groups….nWould you not agree that unless one has the time to participate in a group, one should not do it. In fact, most of us are member of far too many groups.nOne might want to join a group or a forum to learn more about a topic. However, it is better to join and then start participating after a while. How else will you get in front of an audience? So to improve one’s reputation, one must participate. Besides that being a lurker does not help improve one’s reputation, you might also be considered a free-rider and, thereby hurt your reputation. I discussed this with tips and tricks here:n===>> Why social networking groups failnnThe two points below I am not sure where I should categorize them looking at the above two groups so I left them by themselves.nn8th advice “Read other 2 cents advices”n9th advice “Do not forget other ways of networking”nnFinally

  • http://eric-mariacher.blogspot.com/2006/05/my-2-cents-about-online-business.html Eric Mariacher

    Here are my own advices:

    Grow your network while you don't need it

    1st advice “Grow your network while you don't need it”
    2nd advice “know why you want to network”
    3rd advice “get recommendations from current and past colleagues posted on your profile”
    4th advice “make heavy use of the Q&A feature (on LinkedIn) or post on forums”
    5th advice “never use standard boiler plate templates” when inviting people to connect
    6th advice/fact “The more connections you have, the more time you must spend”
    7th advice “join yahoo networking groups. You will learn a lot”
    8th advice “Read other 2 cents advices”
    9th advice “Do not forget other ways of networking”

    read more in details: http://eric-mariacher.blogspot.com/2006/05/my-2

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    Dear Eric

    Thanks so much for your comment. Interesting suggestions you are making. Although after having read your comment twice to make sure, I feel it may apply to how to network but not specifically to how to build your reputation besides maybe point 4 below (see my comment about it).

    I tried to go through your suggstions point-by-point below

    GENERALITIES (no comment from me – these seem obvious and do not need an explanation)
    1st advice “Grow your network while you don't need it”
    2nd advice “know why you want to network”
    5th advice “never use standard boiler plate templates” when inviting people to connect
    6th advice/fact “The more connections you have, the more time you must spend”

    Besides the above 5 there are another 4 that I want to address.

    4th advice “make heavy use of the Q&A feature (on LinkedIn) or post on forums”
    Yes but maybe you may want to advice people that one should post Q&A that are in one's area of expertise. Of course, the same applies to group forums… Otherwise one might not help one's reputation but harm it instead.

    7th advice “join yahoo networking groups. You will learn a lot”
    This makes no sense to me. Why Yahoo groups and not Xing or Google groups….
    Would you not agree that unless one has the time to participate in a group, one should not do it. In fact, most of us are member of far too many groups.
    One might want to join a group or a forum to learn more about a topic. However, it is better to join and then start participating after a while. How else will you get in front of an audience? So to improve one's reputation, one must participate. Besides that being a lurker does not help improve one's reputation, you might also be considered a free-rider and, thereby hurt your reputation. I discussed this with tips and tricks here:
    ===>> Why social networking groups fail

    The two points below I am not sure where I should categorize them looking at the above two groups so I left them by themselves.

    8th advice “Read other 2 cents advices”
    9th advice “Do not forget other ways of networking”

    Finally <ou also suggest:

    3rd advice “get recommendations from current and past colleagues posted on your profile”

    I am not sure if I agree with this. Can I really trust these rcommendations left on a person's profile? I do not put much trust into these when I read them if at all because I tend to ignore them. I prefer to talk to the person and get an impression or else get a recommendation from somebody whom I really know and not a stranger.

    Eric, thanks for sharing and I hope you will re-visit again soon.

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