How BP shrugs off negative reviews

by Urs E. Gattiker on 2010/06/16 · 71 comments 10,223 views

in d business ethics,d business regulation

The Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico is a disaster that has lowered Barack Obama’s standing with voters and, as importantly, BP’s image has landed in the toilet while its shareholders have incurred massive losses.

Such a disastrous situation begs the question: Do social media mentions and consumer or product reviews really make a difference?

    1. US targets $20 billion BP pay-out - when the crisis hits, forget social media monitoring

Image - 5 year trend of BP's share price - droppingAs the Toyota case illustrated, during a crisis the fumbling of a press conference by the company chairman may be what matters most – social media mentions are not even a blip on the screen.

But will this cripple the brand or can the company’s reputation be restored?

BP’s share-price tumbled more than 9 percent this past Monday. US Democratic senators called on the multinational oil company to immediately inject US$20 billion into a ring-fenced fund to clean up the spill in the Gulf of Mexico.

Spending about US$50 million on newspaper and internet ads to improve BP’s image has garnered an icy response from US consumers.

Image - the oil spill is a real disaster - play with this map and see

Today, BP faces a bill that analysts say could run up to US$40 billion (€33 billion). The oil spill is so big that a major part of Alsace (France), Switzerland and southern Germany would be covered if it had happened in Europe (see graphic).

ComMetrics - BP’s Texas City refinery disaster suggests that plenty of regulation was in place, but the devil is in the details

My take: If you have a major disaster on your hands, stay low and for God’s sake fix the problem yesterday. The rest is peanuts.

    2. Defamation or free speech

T&J Towing towed Justin Kurtz’s car from his apartment complex parking lot, despite his permit to park there. Mr Kurtz went to Facebook and started a new page called “Kalamazoo Residents against T&J Towing”. Within two days, 800 people had joined the group, and by June 14 it was about 14,000.

T&J Towing filed a defamation suit against Mr Kurtz. In the suit the company claims the site hurt business and seeks US$750,000 in damages (see below).

YouTube Preview Image

The issue seems to be one of free speech for consumer or defamation against business. In the US these lawsuits are called Strategic Lawsuits Against Public Participation (SLAPPs). These are civil complaints or counter-claims against either an individual or an organization in which the alleged injury was the result of petitioning or free speech activities protected by the First Amendment of the US Constitution.

My take: If Kurtz loses this case more consumers will get sued in the US. In turn, they will try to use fake identities or permission-based social networks to reduce the risk of getting named in a lawsuit.

I don’t believe that consumers complaining about a company on Facebook, or writing reviews about its sloppy customer service can be stopped with lawsuits.

P.S. – Germany has another form of this called Abmahnung, which is basically a cease-and-desist order or consent decree. We reported:

ComMetrics: Frankfurt court issues cease and desist order (see Saturday section)

News channel 3 – T&J Towing responds to allegations of shady business practices (2010-02-11)

    3. Fake reviews or how to remove an unfair review

Peer reviews are seen as more objective than the company line. Recent research in the US indicates that reaching teen influencers means taking advantage of earned-media opportunities and word-of-mouth through highly trusted friends. Apparently, teenage influencers on myYearbook tend to be more likely to recommend various products to their friends than others.

Professor Orlando Figes is an expert on Russian history from Birkbeck College, London University. He admitted to posting anonymous reviews on Amazon’s UK site criticizing the work of such authors as Robert Service and Rachel Polonsky, while lavishly praising his own book.

Did his review lower sales of the books and authors he attacked? We cannot know for certain.

My take: Smaller businesses that trade heavily online or rely on word of mouth must be concerned with online reviews. For instance, a really negative review on travel website TripAdvisor of a family-owned and managed hotel’s breakfast buffet can be a devastating blow to bookings for the next few months. So the impact can be huge.

Nikolaos Korfiatis - Evaluating Content Quality and Usefulness of Online Product Reviews (2008-07-07)

Take-aways
The above indicates online reviews and testimonials matter to many businesses, but may be a lesser concern for large brands. In cases of a disaster they might even be completely useless.

    1. Things are mostly unfair – that is life ! The US administration saw a political advantage in being perceived as rough, tough and even arbitrary. Last week President Obama announced he would ‘ride herd’ on BP and that he was trying to find out “whose ass to kick”.
    Of course, the public has forgotten Occidental Petroleum’s Piper Alpha platform, which exploded in 1988 in British waters due to poor safety precautions, killing 167 people. The media has failed to recount this disaster.
    In cases like these, social media monitoring or collecting social media metrics might not reveal much new. But trying harder to fix the oil spill instead of trying to influence the conversation could be the only answer that matters for the company’s long-term survival.
    3. Anonymous critics can be devastating! Tracking down an individual that sent a negative tweet or left a negative review on some website can be tricky. The server might not be in your jurisdiction and if it is, a court order might be needed to get access.
    If you find out that the comment was written at an Internet café, then only studying the closed-caption TV (CCTV) tapes may reveal the identity of the posters.
    For social network participants – considering the chances of a defamation lawsuit  - this tells us that one should not post anything online that one does not stand by.

What is your take? How do you see these issues? Have you tried to apply any of these approaches to any brand you manage? Do customer reviews really make a difference in times of crisis?

Please let us know in the comments!

Article source: ComMetrics – How BP shrugs off negative reviews

Also, please check out our upcoming complimentary ComMetrics University coffee break webinars and register yourself for the next one - 2010-06-23 ComMetrics University – turning metrics into dollars

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  • http://soenke.myvidoop.com/ Soenke

    Urs,

    Fantastic peace of editing. Thank you!
    Unfortunately, I don't have any cases to report on at hand. It is only from my personal experience I can add the following: Many sites commentary depend nowadays on log-in systems such as Facebook, Twitter, Disqus and OpenID to name but a few.

    Most of the times you are part of a network when using such log-in systems (prominent are Facebook and Twitter). If you care about a tidy online identity you don't post crap or hate mail, since it feeds back to your identity.

    Cheers
    Soenke

    • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

      Soehnke

      Thanks for sharing this comment. Convenience has its price. Besides using OpenID, Facebook and so forth to log in, Disqus is another possibility. This commenting system that we also use collects all a person's comments and makes it easy accessible on the 'mini-commenting blog' the individual has on Disqus.
      Here, not only does this make it more convenient for the blog reader to log in for commenting but, most important, all his or her comments can be read in one place.

      On top, you can immediately share blog comments left on various blogs using Twitter, Facebook and so forth (as I did with this comment).

      Hence, as you point out your digital footprint leaves a path that can be followed by anybody using a major search engine.

      In fact, some people advise teenagers to make sure that they never post negative tweets about their peers, teachers or anything because it will be found eventually and may hurt them at the next job interview.

      Accordingly, companies should treat their customers with care and as individuals must, refrain from spreading negative tweets, wall posts on Facebook and so forth.

      Soenke, thanks so much for sharing.

  • Chris McGeehan

    Urs:

    Actually social media is playing a role, just not in BP's favor. If anything, social media is fanning the flames of outrage against BP.

    There are fake videos, see

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2AAa0gd7ClM&feat
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HtfevVB5eBk&NR=1
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O8NIrw2l9x8&feat

    The fake BP public relations Twitter feed:

    http://twitter.com/bpglobalpr
    Example: “The good news: Mermaids are real. The bad news: They are now extinct. #bpcares”

    There are also numerous suggested new logos for BP, many of which are collected here:

    http://www.logomyway.com/contestView.php?contes

    Further, online groups are used to mobilize action against BP, most recently this has shown up in attacks against Tony Hayward for going to a yacht race this past weekend:

    http://www.ndtv.com/news/world/oil-spill-bp-hea

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  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    @Chris_McGeehan thanks for the BP oil spill feedback. u00a0nnEarly June 10 a court verdict brought the Bhopal disaster’s sorry history sharply to light. nJust to refresh our memory, the deadly poison gas cloud that erupted when water accidentally entered a methyl isocyanate storage tank 26 years ago caused thousands of people to die.nnTo compare that disaster with BP’s Gulf oil spill, here are some statistics I found:nn- – u00a030,000 – maximum estimate of deaths within 8km radius of Union Carbide plant in the Indian city of Bhopal;n- – 325 tonnes of toxic material said to lie at plant sitenn- – u20ac1,765 or $2,100 compensation if a family’s son died or u20ac440 if one’s husband died in the accident n- – u00a0$470m compensation in 1989 paid by Union Carbide, based in Danbury, Connecticut – now part of US national Dow Chemical;nn- – u00a02 years jail terms handed to 7 remaining Union Carbide managers (i.e. one died) – but still years away from imprisonment as they are expected to appeal;n- – u20ac1,765 or $2,100 fines handed to Union Carbide managers;n- – poisons continue to leach into the groundwater until this day…nnIs this Ethical?nBUSINESS ETHICS – QUO VADIS?nRobert Blake, a top US state department official urged India not to allow Bhopal to damage warming US-India relations. nDoes this mean Dow Chemical should not be held accountable? nnShould David Cameron point out to Barack Obama that holding BP responsible for the Deepwater Horizon disaster might damage US – UK relations? Inquiring minds would like to know.nnUnion Carbide has stated that its executives were not responsible for the plant’s operation only those of its Indian subsidiary. nBut does the buck not stop with the company’s board? Is the board not ultimately responsible for letting local management be as sloppy as they apparently were in Bhopal, in order to to meet profit targets set by top management and the board in the US?nnQUESTIONnIf BP is held accountable in the US, why not US companies when they are responsible for a disaster like the one in Bhopal?nnNo surprise that the recent court ruling and comments by US officials like Robert Blake (see above) heightens the sense of betrayal for community members.nnMaybe I am naive and this is just a political reality. Meaning, the worth of a US citizen’s livelihood or property, etc is much more than people living in other countries such as UK, India and so forth?

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    @Chris_McGeehan thanks for the BP oil spill feedback. u00a0nnEarly June 10 a court verdict brought the Bhopal disaster’s sorry history sharply to light. nJust to refresh our memory, the deadly poison gas cloud that erupted when water accidentally entered a methyl isocyanate storage tank 26 years ago caused thousands of people to die.nnTo compare that disaster with BP’s Gulf oil spill, here are some statistics I found:nn- – u00a030,000 – maximum estimate of deaths within 8km radius of Union Carbide plant in the Indian city of Bhopal;n- – 325 tonnes of toxic material said to lie at plant sitenn- – u20ac1,765 or $2,100 compensation if a family’s son died or u20ac440 if one’s husband died in the accident n- – u00a0$470m compensation in 1989 paid by Union Carbide, based in Danbury, Connecticut – now part of US national Dow Chemical;nn- – u00a02 years jail terms handed to 7 remaining Union Carbide managers (i.e. one died) – but still years away from imprisonment as they are expected to appeal;n- – u20ac1,765 or $2,100 fines handed to Union Carbide managers;n- – poisons continue to leach into the groundwater until this day…nnIs this Ethical?nBUSINESS ETHICS – QUO VADIS?nRobert Blake, a top US state department official urged India not to allow Bhopal to damage warming US-India relations. nDoes this mean Dow Chemical should not be held accountable? nnShould David Cameron point out to Barack Obama that holding BP responsible for the Deepwater Horizon disaster might damage US – UK relations? Inquiring minds would like to know.nnUnion Carbide has stated that its executives were not responsible for the plant’s operation only those of its Indian subsidiary. nBut does the buck not stop with the company’s board? Is the board not ultimately responsible for letting local management be as sloppy as they apparently were in Bhopal, in order to to meet profit targets set by top management and the board in the US?nnQUESTIONnIf BP is held accountable in the US, why not US companies when they are responsible for a disaster like the one in Bhopal?nnNo surprise that the recent court ruling and comments by US officials like Robert Blake (see above) heightens the sense of betrayal for community members.nnMaybe I am naive and this is just a political reality. Meaning, the worth of a US citizen’s livelihood or property, etc is much more than people living in other countries such as UK, India and so forth?

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    @Chris_McGeehan thanks for the BP oil spill feedback. u00a0nnEarly June 10 a court verdict brought the Bhopal disaster’s sorry history sharply to light. nJust to refresh our memory, the deadly poison gas cloud that erupted when water accidentally entered a methyl isocyanate storage tank 26 years ago caused thousands of people to die.nnTo compare that disaster with BP’s Gulf oil spill, here are some statistics I found:nn- – u00a030,000 – maximum estimate of deaths within 8km radius of Union Carbide plant in the Indian city of Bhopal;n- – 325 tonnes of toxic material said to lie at plant sitenn- – u20ac1,765 or $2,100 compensation if a family’s son died or u20ac440 if one’s husband died in the accident n- – u00a0$470m compensation in 1989 paid by Union Carbide, based in Danbury, Connecticut – now part of US national Dow Chemical;nn- – u00a02 years jail terms handed to 7 remaining Union Carbide managers (i.e. one died) – but still years away from imprisonment as they are expected to appeal;n- – u20ac1,765 or $2,100 fines handed to Union Carbide managers;n- – poisons continue to leach into the groundwater until this day…nnIs this Ethical?nBUSINESS ETHICS – QUO VADIS?nRobert Blake, a top US state department official urged India not to allow Bhopal to damage warming US-India relations. nDoes this mean Dow Chemical should not be held accountable? nnShould David Cameron point out to Barack Obama that holding BP responsible for the Deepwater Horizon disaster might damage US – UK relations? Inquiring minds would like to know.nnUnion Carbide has stated that its executives were not responsible for the plant’s operation only those of its Indian subsidiary. nBut does the buck not stop with the company’s board? Is the board not ultimately responsible for letting local management be as sloppy as they apparently were in Bhopal, in order to to meet profit targets set by top management and the board in the US?nnQUESTIONnIf BP is held accountable in the US, why not US companies when they are responsible for a disaster like the one in Bhopal?nnNo surprise that the recent court ruling and comments by US officials like Robert Blake (see above) heightens the sense of betrayal for community members.nnMaybe I am naive and this is just a political reality. Meaning, the worth of a US citizen’s livelihood or property, etc is much more than people living in other countries such as UK, India and so forth?

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    @Chris_McGeehan thanks for the BP oil spill feedback. u00a0nnEarly June 10 a court verdict brought the Bhopal disaster’s sorry history sharply to light. nJust to refresh our memory, the deadly poison gas cloud that erupted when water accidentally entered a methyl isocyanate storage tank 26 years ago caused thousands of people to die.nnTo compare that disaster with BP’s Gulf oil spill, here are some statistics I found:nn- – u00a030,000 – maximum estimate of deaths within 8km radius of Union Carbide plant in the Indian city of Bhopal;n- – 325 tonnes of toxic material said to lie at plant sitenn- – u20ac1,765 or $2,100 compensation if a family’s son died or u20ac440 if one’s husband died in the accident n- – u00a0$470m compensation in 1989 paid by Union Carbide, based in Danbury, Connecticut – now part of US national Dow Chemical;nn- – u00a02 years jail terms handed to 7 remaining Union Carbide managers (i.e. one died) – but still years away from imprisonment as they are expected to appeal;n- – u20ac1,765 or $2,100 fines handed to Union Carbide managers;n- – poisons continue to leach into the groundwater until this day…nnIs this Ethical?nBUSINESS ETHICS – QUO VADIS?nRobert Blake, a top US state department official urged India not to allow Bhopal to damage warming US-India relations. nDoes this mean Dow Chemical should not be held accountable? nnShould David Cameron point out to Barack Obama that holding BP responsible for the Deepwater Horizon disaster might damage US – UK relations? Inquiring minds would like to know.nnUnion Carbide has stated that its executives were not responsible for the plant’s operation only those of its Indian subsidiary. nBut does the buck not stop with the company’s board? Is the board not ultimately responsible for letting local management be as sloppy as they apparently were in Bhopal, in order to to meet profit targets set by top management and the board in the US?nnQUESTIONnIf BP is held accountable in the US, why not US companies when they are responsible for a disaster like the one in Bhopal?nnNo surprise that the recent court ruling and comments by US officials like Robert Blake (see above) heightens the sense of betrayal for community members.nnMaybe I am naive and this is just a political reality. Meaning, the worth of a US citizen’s livelihood or property, etc is much more than people living in other countries such as UK, India and so forth?

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    @Chris_McGeehan thanks for the BP oil spill feedback. u00a0nnEarly June 10 a court verdict brought the Bhopal disaster’s sorry history sharply to light. nJust to refresh our memory, the deadly poison gas cloud that erupted when water accidentally entered a methyl isocyanate storage tank 26 years ago caused thousands of people to die.nnTo compare that disaster with BP’s Gulf oil spill, here are some statistics I found:nn- – u00a030,000 – maximum estimate of deaths within 8km radius of Union Carbide plant in the Indian city of Bhopal;n- – 325 tonnes of toxic material said to lie at plant sitenn- – u20ac1,765 or $2,100 compensation if a family’s son died or u20ac440 if one’s husband died in the accident n- – u00a0$470m compensation in 1989 paid by Union Carbide, based in Danbury, Connecticut – now part of US national Dow Chemical;nn- – u00a02 years jail terms handed to 7 remaining Union Carbide managers (i.e. one died) – but still years away from imprisonment as they are expected to appeal;n- – u20ac1,765 or $2,100 fines handed to Union Carbide managers;n- – poisons continue to leach into the groundwater until this day…nnIs this Ethical?nBUSINESS ETHICS – QUO VADIS?nRobert Blake, a top US state department official urged India not to allow Bhopal to damage warming US-India relations. nDoes this mean Dow Chemical should not be held accountable? nnShould David Cameron point out to Barack Obama that holding BP responsible for the Deepwater Horizon disaster might damage US – UK relations? Inquiring minds would like to know.nnUnion Carbide has stated that its executives were not responsible for the plant’s operation only those of its Indian subsidiary. nBut does the buck not stop with the company’s board? Is the board not ultimately responsible for letting local management be as sloppy as they apparently were in Bhopal, in order to to meet profit targets set by top management and the board in the US?nnQUESTIONnIf BP is held accountable in the US, why not US companies when they are responsible for a disaster like the one in Bhopal?nnNo surprise that the recent court ruling and comments by US officials like Robert Blake (see above) heightens the sense of betrayal for community members.nnMaybe I am naive and this is just a political reality. Meaning, the worth of a US citizen’s livelihood or property, etc is much more than people living in other countries such as UK, India and so forth?

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    @Chris_McGeehan thanks for the BP oil spill feedback. u00a0nnEarly June 10 a court verdict brought the Bhopal disaster’s sorry history sharply to light. nJust to refresh our memory, the deadly poison gas cloud that erupted when water accidentally entered a methyl isocyanate storage tank 26 years ago caused thousands of people to die.nnTo compare that disaster with BP’s Gulf oil spill, here are some statistics I found:nn- – u00a030,000 – maximum estimate of deaths within 8km radius of Union Carbide plant in the Indian city of Bhopal;n- – 325 tonnes of toxic material said to lie at plant sitenn- – u20ac1,765 or $2,100 compensation if a family’s son died or u20ac440 if one’s husband died in the accident n- – u00a0$470m compensation in 1989 paid by Union Carbide, based in Danbury, Connecticut – now part of US national Dow Chemical;nn- – u00a02 years jail terms handed to 7 remaining Union Carbide managers (i.e. one died) – but still years away from imprisonment as they are expected to appeal;n- – u20ac1,765 or $2,100 fines handed to Union Carbide managers;n- – poisons continue to leach into the groundwater until this day…nnIs this Ethical?nBUSINESS ETHICS – QUO VADIS?nRobert Blake, a top US state department official urged India not to allow Bhopal to damage warming US-India relations. nDoes this mean Dow Chemical should not be held accountable? nnShould David Cameron point out to Barack Obama that holding BP responsible for the Deepwater Horizon disaster might damage US – UK relations? Inquiring minds would like to know.nnUnion Carbide has stated that its executives were not responsible for the plant’s operation only those of its Indian subsidiary. nBut does the buck not stop with the company’s board? Is the board not ultimately responsible for letting local management be as sloppy as they apparently were in Bhopal, in order to to meet profit targets set by top management and the board in the US?nnQUESTIONnIf BP is held accountable in the US, why not US companies when they are responsible for a disaster like the one in Bhopal?nnNo surprise that the recent court ruling and comments by US officials like Robert Blake (see above) heightens the sense of betrayal for community members.nnMaybe I am naive and this is just a political reality. Meaning, the worth of a US citizen’s livelihood or property, etc is much more than people living in other countries such as UK, India and so forth?

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    @Chris_McGeehan thanks for the BP oil spill feedback. u00a0nnEarly June 10 a court verdict brought the Bhopal disaster’s sorry history sharply to light. nJust to refresh our memory, the deadly poison gas cloud that erupted when water accidentally entered a methyl isocyanate storage tank 26 years ago caused thousands of people to die.nnTo compare that disaster with BP’s Gulf oil spill, here are some statistics I found:nn- – u00a030,000 – maximum estimate of deaths within 8km radius of Union Carbide plant in the Indian city of Bhopal;n- – 325 tonnes of toxic material said to lie at plant sitenn- – u20ac1,765 or $2,100 compensation if a family’s son died or u20ac440 if one’s husband died in the accident n- – u00a0$470m compensation in 1989 paid by Union Carbide, based in Danbury, Connecticut – now part of US national Dow Chemical;nn- – u00a02 years jail terms handed to 7 remaining Union Carbide managers (i.e. one died) – but still years away from imprisonment as they are expected to appeal;n- – u20ac1,765 or $2,100 fines handed to Union Carbide managers;n- – poisons continue to leach into the groundwater until this day…nnIs this Ethical?nBUSINESS ETHICS – QUO VADIS?nRobert Blake, a top US state department official urged India not to allow Bhopal to damage warming US-India relations. nDoes this mean Dow Chemical should not be held accountable? nnShould David Cameron point out to Barack Obama that holding BP responsible for the Deepwater Horizon disaster might damage US – UK relations? Inquiring minds would like to know.nnUnion Carbide has stated that its executives were not responsible for the plant’s operation only those of its Indian subsidiary. nBut does the buck not stop with the company’s board? Is the board not ultimately responsible for letting local management be as sloppy as they apparently were in Bhopal, in order to to meet profit targets set by top management and the board in the US?nnQUESTIONnIf BP is held accountable in the US, why not US companies when they are responsible for a disaster like the one in Bhopal?nnNo surprise that the recent court ruling and comments by US officials like Robert Blake (see above) heightens the sense of betrayal for community members.nnMaybe I am naive and this is just a political reality. Meaning, the worth of a US citizen’s livelihood or property, etc is much more than people living in other countries such as UK, India and so forth?

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    @Chris_McGeehan thanks for the BP oil spill feedback. u00a0nnEarly June 10 a court verdict brought the Bhopal disaster’s sorry history sharply to light. nJust to refresh our memory, the deadly poison gas cloud that erupted when water accidentally entered a methyl isocyanate storage tank 26 years ago caused thousands of people to die.nnTo compare that disaster with BP’s Gulf oil spill, here are some statistics I found:nn- – u00a030,000 – maximum estimate of deaths within 8km radius of Union Carbide plant in the Indian city of Bhopal;n- – 325 tonnes of toxic material said to lie at plant sitenn- – u20ac1,765 or $2,100 compensation if a family’s son died or u20ac440 if one’s husband died in the accident n- – u00a0$470m compensation in 1989 paid by Union Carbide, based in Danbury, Connecticut – now part of US national Dow Chemical;nn- – u00a02 years jail terms handed to 7 remaining Union Carbide managers (i.e. one died) – but still years away from imprisonment as they are expected to appeal;n- – u20ac1,765 or $2,100 fines handed to Union Carbide managers;n- – poisons continue to leach into the groundwater until this day…nnIs this Ethical?nBUSINESS ETHICS – QUO VADIS?nRobert Blake, a top US state department official urged India not to allow Bhopal to damage warming US-India relations. nDoes this mean Dow Chemical should not be held accountable? nnShould David Cameron point out to Barack Obama that holding BP responsible for the Deepwater Horizon disaster might damage US – UK relations? Inquiring minds would like to know.nnUnion Carbide has stated that its executives were not responsible for the plant’s operation only those of its Indian subsidiary. nBut does the buck not stop with the company’s board? Is the board not ultimately responsible for letting local management be as sloppy as they apparently were in Bhopal, in order to to meet profit targets set by top management and the board in the US?nnQUESTIONnIf BP is held accountable in the US, why not US companies when they are responsible for a disaster like the one in Bhopal?nnNo surprise that the recent court ruling and comments by US officials like Robert Blake (see above) heightens the sense of betrayal for community members.nnMaybe I am naive and this is just a political reality. Meaning, the worth of a US citizen’s livelihood or property, etc is much more than people living in other countries such as UK, India and so forth?

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    @Chris_McGeehan thanks for the BP oil spill feedback. u00a0nnEarly June 10 a court verdict brought the Bhopal disaster’s sorry history sharply to light. nJust to refresh our memory, the deadly poison gas cloud that erupted when water accidentally entered a methyl isocyanate storage tank 26 years ago caused thousands of people to die.nnTo compare that disaster with BP’s Gulf oil spill, here are some statistics I found:nn- – u00a030,000 – maximum estimate of deaths within 8km radius of Union Carbide plant in the Indian city of Bhopal;n- – 325 tonnes of toxic material said to lie at plant sitenn- – u20ac1,765 or $2,100 compensation if a family’s son died or u20ac440 if one’s husband died in the accident n- – u00a0$470m compensation in 1989 paid by Union Carbide, based in Danbury, Connecticut – now part of US national Dow Chemical;nn- – u00a02 years jail terms handed to 7 remaining Union Carbide managers (i.e. one died) – but still years away from imprisonment as they are expected to appeal;n- – u20ac1,765 or $2,100 fines handed to Union Carbide managers;n- – poisons continue to leach into the groundwater until this day…nnIs this Ethical?nBUSINESS ETHICS – QUO VADIS?nRobert Blake, a top US state department official urged India not to allow Bhopal to damage warming US-India relations. nDoes this mean Dow Chemical should not be held accountable? nnShould David Cameron point out to Barack Obama that holding BP responsible for the Deepwater Horizon disaster might damage US – UK relations? Inquiring minds would like to know.nnUnion Carbide has stated that its executives were not responsible for the plant’s operation only those of its Indian subsidiary. nBut does the buck not stop with the company’s board? Is the board not ultimately responsible for letting local management be as sloppy as they apparently were in Bhopal, in order to to meet profit targets set by top management and the board in the US?nnQUESTIONnIf BP is held accountable in the US, why not US companies when they are responsible for a disaster like the one in Bhopal?nnNo surprise that the recent court ruling and comments by US officials like Robert Blake (see above) heightens the sense of betrayal for community members.nnMaybe I am naive and this is just a political reality. Meaning, the worth of a US citizen’s livelihood or property, etc is much more than people living in other countries such as UK, India and so forth?

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    @Chris_McGeehan thanks for the BP oil spill feedback. u00a0nnEarly June 10 a court verdict brought the Bhopal disaster’s sorry history sharply to light. nJust to refresh our memory, the deadly poison gas cloud that erupted when water accidentally entered a methyl isocyanate storage tank 26 years ago caused thousands of people to die.nnTo compare that disaster with BP’s Gulf oil spill, here are some statistics I found:nn- – u00a030,000 – maximum estimate of deaths within 8km radius of Union Carbide plant in the Indian city of Bhopal;n- – 325 tonnes of toxic material said to lie at plant sitenn- – u20ac1,765 or $2,100 compensation if a family’s son died or u20ac440 if one’s husband died in the accident n- – u00a0$470m compensation in 1989 paid by Union Carbide, based in Danbury, Connecticut – now part of US national Dow Chemical;nn- – u00a02 years jail terms handed to 7 remaining Union Carbide managers (i.e. one died) – but still years away from imprisonment as they are expected to appeal;n- – u20ac1,765 or $2,100 fines handed to Union Carbide managers;n- – poisons continue to leach into the groundwater until this day…nnIs this Ethical?nBUSINESS ETHICS – QUO VADIS?nRobert Blake, a top US state department official urged India not to allow Bhopal to damage warming US-India relations. nDoes this mean Dow Chemical should not be held accountable? nnShould David Cameron point out to Barack Obama that holding BP responsible for the Deepwater Horizon disaster might damage US – UK relations? Inquiring minds would like to know.nnUnion Carbide has stated that its executives were not responsible for the plant’s operation only those of its Indian subsidiary. nBut does the buck not stop with the company’s board? Is the board not ultimately responsible for letting local management be as sloppy as they apparently were in Bhopal, in order to to meet profit targets set by top management and the board in the US?nnQUESTIONnIf BP is held accountable in the US, why not US companies when they are responsible for a disaster like the one in Bhopal?nnNo surprise that the recent court ruling and comments by US officials like Robert Blake (see above) heightens the sense of betrayal for community members.nnMaybe I am naive and this is just a political reality. Meaning, the worth of a US citizen’s livelihood or property, etc is much more than people living in other countries such as UK, India and so forth?

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    @Chris_McGeehan thanks for the BP oil spill feedback. u00a0nnEarly June 10 a court verdict brought the Bhopal disaster’s sorry history sharply to light. nJust to refresh our memory, the deadly poison gas cloud that erupted when water accidentally entered a methyl isocyanate storage tank 26 years ago caused thousands of people to die.nnTo compare that disaster with BP’s Gulf oil spill, here are some statistics I found:nn- – u00a030,000 – maximum estimate of deaths within 8km radius of Union Carbide plant in the Indian city of Bhopal;n- – 325 tonnes of toxic material said to lie at plant sitenn- – u20ac1,765 or $2,100 compensation if a family’s son died or u20ac440 if one’s husband died in the accident n- – u00a0$470m compensation in 1989 paid by Union Carbide, based in Danbury, Connecticut – now part of US national Dow Chemical;nn- – u00a02 years jail terms handed to 7 remaining Union Carbide managers (i.e. one died) – but still years away from imprisonment as they are expected to appeal;n- – u20ac1,765 or $2,100 fines handed to Union Carbide managers;n- – poisons continue to leach into the groundwater until this day…nnIs this Ethical?nBUSINESS ETHICS – QUO VADIS?nRobert Blake, a top US state department official urged India not to allow Bhopal to damage warming US-India relations. nDoes this mean Dow Chemical should not be held accountable? nnShould David Cameron point out to Barack Obama that holding BP responsible for the Deepwater Horizon disaster might damage US – UK relations? Inquiring minds would like to know.nnUnion Carbide has stated that its executives were not responsible for the plant’s operation only those of its Indian subsidiary. nBut does the buck not stop with the company’s board? Is the board not ultimately responsible for letting local management be as sloppy as they apparently were in Bhopal, in order to to meet profit targets set by top management and the board in the US?nnQUESTIONnIf BP is held accountable in the US, why not US companies when they are responsible for a disaster like the one in Bhopal?nnNo surprise that the recent court ruling and comments by US officials like Robert Blake (see above) heightens the sense of betrayal for community members.nnMaybe I am naive and this is just a political reality. Meaning, the worth of a US citizen’s livelihood or property, etc is much more than people living in other countries such as UK, India and so forth?

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    @Chris_McGeehan thanks for the BP oil spill feedback. u00a0nnEarly June 10 a court verdict brought the Bhopal disaster’s sorry history sharply to light. nJust to refresh our memory, the deadly poison gas cloud that erupted when water accidentally entered a methyl isocyanate storage tank 26 years ago caused thousands of people to die.nnTo compare that disaster with BP’s Gulf oil spill, here are some statistics I found:nn- – u00a030,000 – maximum estimate of deaths within 8km radius of Union Carbide plant in the Indian city of Bhopal;n- – 325 tonnes of toxic material said to lie at plant sitenn- – u20ac1,765 or $2,100 compensation if a family’s son died or u20ac440 if one’s husband died in the accident n- – u00a0$470m compensation in 1989 paid by Union Carbide, based in Danbury, Connecticut – now part of US national Dow Chemical;nn- – u00a02 years jail terms handed to 7 remaining Union Carbide managers (i.e. one died) – but still years away from imprisonment as they are expected to appeal;n- – u20ac1,765 or $2,100 fines handed to Union Carbide managers;n- – poisons continue to leach into the groundwater until this day…nnIs this Ethical?nBUSINESS ETHICS – QUO VADIS?nRobert Blake, a top US state department official urged India not to allow Bhopal to damage warming US-India relations. nDoes this mean Dow Chemical should not be held accountable? nnShould David Cameron point out to Barack Obama that holding BP responsible for the Deepwater Horizon disaster might damage US – UK relations? Inquiring minds would like to know.nnUnion Carbide has stated that its executives were not responsible for the plant’s operation only those of its Indian subsidiary. nBut does the buck not stop with the company’s board? Is the board not ultimately responsible for letting local management be as sloppy as they apparently were in Bhopal, in order to to meet profit targets set by top management and the board in the US?nnQUESTIONnIf BP is held accountable in the US, why not US companies when they are responsible for a disaster like the one in Bhopal?nnNo surprise that the recent court ruling and comments by US officials like Robert Blake (see above) heightens the sense of betrayal for community members.nnMaybe I am naive and this is just a political reality. Meaning, the worth of a US citizen’s livelihood or property, etc is much more than people living in other countries such as UK, India and so forth?

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    @Chris_McGeehan thanks for the BP oil spill feedback. u00a0nnEarly June 10 a court verdict brought the Bhopal disaster’s sorry history sharply to light. nJust to refresh our memory, the deadly poison gas cloud that erupted when water accidentally entered a methyl isocyanate storage tank 26 years ago caused thousands of people to die.nnTo compare that disaster with BP’s Gulf oil spill, here are some statistics I found:nn- – u00a030,000 – maximum estimate of deaths within 8km radius of Union Carbide plant in the Indian city of Bhopal;n- – 325 tonnes of toxic material said to lie at plant sitenn- – u20ac1,765 or $2,100 compensation if a family’s son died or u20ac440 if one’s husband died in the accident n- – u00a0$470m compensation in 1989 paid by Union Carbide, based in Danbury, Connecticut – now part of US national Dow Chemical;nn- – u00a02 years jail terms handed to 7 remaining Union Carbide managers (i.e. one died) – but still years away from imprisonment as they are expected to appeal;n- – u20ac1,765 or $2,100 fines handed to Union Carbide managers;n- – poisons continue to leach into the groundwater until this day…nnIs this Ethical?nBUSINESS ETHICS – QUO VADIS?nRobert Blake, a top US state department official urged India not to allow Bhopal to damage warming US-India relations. nDoes this mean Dow Chemical should not be held accountable? nnShould David Cameron point out to Barack Obama that holding BP responsible for the Deepwater Horizon disaster might damage US – UK relations? Inquiring minds would like to know.nnUnion Carbide has stated that its executives were not responsible for the plant’s operation only those of its Indian subsidiary. nBut does the buck not stop with the company’s board? Is the board not ultimately responsible for letting local management be as sloppy as they apparently were in Bhopal, in order to to meet profit targets set by top management and the board in the US?nnQUESTIONnIf BP is held accountable in the US, why not US companies when they are responsible for a disaster like the one in Bhopal?nnNo surprise that the recent court ruling and comments by US officials like Robert Blake (see above) heightens the sense of betrayal for community members.nnMaybe I am naive and this is just a political reality. Meaning, the worth of a US citizen’s livelihood or property, etc is much more than people living in other countries such as UK, India and so forth?

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    @Chris_McGeehan thanks for the BP oil spill feedback. u00a0nnEarly June 10 a court verdict brought the Bhopal disaster’s sorry history sharply to light. nJust to refresh our memory, the deadly poison gas cloud that erupted when water accidentally entered a methyl isocyanate storage tank 26 years ago caused thousands of people to die.nnTo compare that disaster with BP’s Gulf oil spill, here are some statistics I found:nn- – u00a030,000 – maximum estimate of deaths within 8km radius of Union Carbide plant in the Indian city of Bhopal;n- – 325 tonnes of toxic material said to lie at plant sitenn- – u20ac1,765 or $2,100 compensation if a family’s son died or u20ac440 if one’s husband died in the accident n- – u00a0$470m compensation in 1989 paid by Union Carbide, based in Danbury, Connecticut – now part of US national Dow Chemical;nn- – u00a02 years jail terms handed to 7 remaining Union Carbide managers (i.e. one died) – but still years away from imprisonment as they are expected to appeal;n- – u20ac1,765 or $2,100 fines handed to Union Carbide managers;n- – poisons continue to leach into the groundwater until this day…nnIs this Ethical?nBUSINESS ETHICS – QUO VADIS?nRobert Blake, a top US state department official urged India not to allow Bhopal to damage warming US-India relations. nDoes this mean Dow Chemical should not be held accountable? nnShould David Cameron point out to Barack Obama that holding BP responsible for the Deepwater Horizon disaster might damage US – UK relations? Inquiring minds would like to know.nnUnion Carbide has stated that its executives were not responsible for the plant’s operation only those of its Indian subsidiary. nBut does the buck not stop with the company’s board? Is the board not ultimately responsible for letting local management be as sloppy as they apparently were in Bhopal, in order to to meet profit targets set by top management and the board in the US?nnQUESTIONnIf BP is held accountable in the US, why not US companies when they are responsible for a disaster like the one in Bhopal?nnNo surprise that the recent court ruling and comments by US officials like Robert Blake (see above) heightens the sense of betrayal for community members.nnMaybe I am naive and this is just a political reality. Meaning, the worth of a US citizen’s livelihood or property, etc is much more than people living in other countries such as UK, India and so forth?

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    @Chris_McGeehan thanks for the BP oil spill feedback. u00a0nnEarly June 10 a court verdict brought the Bhopal disaster’s sorry history sharply to light. nJust to refresh our memory, the deadly poison gas cloud that erupted when water accidentally entered a methyl isocyanate storage tank 26 years ago caused thousands of people to die.nnTo compare that disaster with BP’s Gulf oil spill, here are some statistics I found:nn- – u00a030,000 – maximum estimate of deaths within 8km radius of Union Carbide plant in the Indian city of Bhopal;n- – 325 tonnes of toxic material said to lie at plant sitenn- – u20ac1,765 or $2,100 compensation if a family’s son died or u20ac440 if one’s husband died in the accident n- – u00a0$470m compensation in 1989 paid by Union Carbide, based in Danbury, Connecticut – now part of US national Dow Chemical;nn- – u00a02 years jail terms handed to 7 remaining Union Carbide managers (i.e. one died) – but still years away from imprisonment as they are expected to appeal;n- – u20ac1,765 or $2,100 fines handed to Union Carbide managers;n- – poisons continue to leach into the groundwater until this day…nnIs this Ethical?nBUSINESS ETHICS – QUO VADIS?nRobert Blake, a top US state department official urged India not to allow Bhopal to damage warming US-India relations. nDoes this mean Dow Chemical should not be held accountable? nnShould David Cameron point out to Barack Obama that holding BP responsible for the Deepwater Horizon disaster might damage US – UK relations? Inquiring minds would like to know.nnUnion Carbide has stated that its executives were not responsible for the plant’s operation only those of its Indian subsidiary. nBut does the buck not stop with the company’s board? Is the board not ultimately responsible for letting local management be as sloppy as they apparently were in Bhopal, in order to to meet profit targets set by top management and the board in the US?nnQUESTIONnIf BP is held accountable in the US, why not US companies when they are responsible for a disaster like the one in Bhopal?nnNo surprise that the recent court ruling and comments by US officials like Robert Blake (see above) heightens the sense of betrayal for community members.nnMaybe I am naive and this is just a political reality. Meaning, the worth of a US citizen’s livelihood or property, etc is much more than people living in other countries such as UK, India and so forth?

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    @Chris_McGeehan thanks for the BP oil spill feedback. u00a0nnEarly June 10 a court verdict brought the Bhopal disaster’s sorry history sharply to light. nJust to refresh our memory, the deadly poison gas cloud that erupted when water accidentally entered a methyl isocyanate storage tank 26 years ago caused thousands of people to die.nnTo compare that disaster with BP’s Gulf oil spill, here are some statistics I found:nn- – u00a030,000 – maximum estimate of deaths within 8km radius of Union Carbide plant in the Indian city of Bhopal;n- – 325 tonnes of toxic material said to lie at plant sitenn- – u20ac1,765 or $2,100 compensation if a family’s son died or u20ac440 if one’s husband died in the accident n- – u00a0$470m compensation in 1989 paid by Union Carbide, based in Danbury, Connecticut – now part of US national Dow Chemical;nn- – u00a02 years jail terms handed to 7 remaining Union Carbide managers (i.e. one died) – but still years away from imprisonment as they are expected to appeal;n- – u20ac1,765 or $2,100 fines handed to Union Carbide managers;n- – poisons continue to leach into the groundwater until this day…nnIs this Ethical?nBUSINESS ETHICS – QUO VADIS?nRobert Blake, a top US state department official urged India not to allow Bhopal to damage warming US-India relations. nDoes this mean Dow Chemical should not be held accountable? nnShould David Cameron point out to Barack Obama that holding BP responsible for the Deepwater Horizon disaster might damage US – UK relations? Inquiring minds would like to know.nnUnion Carbide has stated that its executives were not responsible for the plant’s operation only those of its Indian subsidiary. nBut does the buck not stop with the company’s board? Is the board not ultimately responsible for letting local management be as sloppy as they apparently were in Bhopal, in order to to meet profit targets set by top management and the board in the US?nnQUESTIONnIf BP is held accountable in the US, why not US companies when they are responsible for a disaster like the one in Bhopal?nnNo surprise that the recent court ruling and comments by US officials like Robert Blake (see above) heightens the sense of betrayal for community members.nnMaybe I am naive and this is just a political reality. Meaning, the worth of a US citizen’s livelihood or property, etc is much more than people living in other countries such as UK, India and so forth?

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    @Chris_McGeehan thanks for the BP oil spill feedback. u00a0nnEarly June 10 a court verdict brought the Bhopal disaster’s sorry history sharply to light. nJust to refresh our memory, the deadly poison gas cloud that erupted when water accidentally entered a methyl isocyanate storage tank 26 years ago caused thousands of people to die.nnTo compare that disaster with BP’s Gulf oil spill, here are some statistics I found:nn- – u00a030,000 – maximum estimate of deaths within 8km radius of Union Carbide plant in the Indian city of Bhopal;n- – 325 tonnes of toxic material said to lie at plant sitenn- – u20ac1,765 or $2,100 compensation if a family’s son died or u20ac440 if one’s husband died in the accident n- – u00a0$470m compensation in 1989 paid by Union Carbide, based in Danbury, Connecticut – now part of US national Dow Chemical;nn- – u00a02 years jail terms handed to 7 remaining Union Carbide managers (i.e. one died) – but still years away from imprisonment as they are expected to appeal;n- – u20ac1,765 or $2,100 fines handed to Union Carbide managers;n- – poisons continue to leach into the groundwater until this day…nnIs this Ethical?nBUSINESS ETHICS – QUO VADIS?nRobert Blake, a top US state department official urged India not to allow Bhopal to damage warming US-India relations. nDoes this mean Dow Chemical should not be held accountable? nnShould David Cameron point out to Barack Obama that holding BP responsible for the Deepwater Horizon disaster might damage US – UK relations? Inquiring minds would like to know.nnUnion Carbide has stated that its executives were not responsible for the plant’s operation only those of its Indian subsidiary. nBut does the buck not stop with the company’s board? Is the board not ultimately responsible for letting local management be as sloppy as they apparently were in Bhopal, in order to to meet profit targets set by top management and the board in the US?nnQUESTIONnIf BP is held accountable in the US, why not US companies when they are responsible for a disaster like the one in Bhopal?nnNo surprise that the recent court ruling and comments by US officials like Robert Blake (see above) heightens the sense of betrayal for community members.nnMaybe I am naive and this is just a political reality. Meaning, the worth of a US citizen’s livelihood or property, etc is much more than people living in other countries such as UK, India and so forth?

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    @Chris_McGeehan thanks for the BP oil spill feedback. u00a0nnEarly June 10 a court verdict brought the Bhopal disaster’s sorry history sharply to light. nJust to refresh our memory, the deadly poison gas cloud that erupted when water accidentally entered a methyl isocyanate storage tank 26 years ago caused thousands of people to die.nnTo compare that disaster with BP’s Gulf oil spill, here are some statistics I found:nn- – u00a030,000 – maximum estimate of deaths within 8km radius of Union Carbide plant in the Indian city of Bhopal;n- – 325 tonnes of toxic material said to lie at plant sitenn- – u20ac1,765 or $2,100 compensation if a family’s son died or u20ac440 if one’s husband died in the accident n- – u00a0$470m compensation in 1989 paid by Union Carbide, based in Danbury, Connecticut – now part of US national Dow Chemical;nn- – u00a02 years jail terms handed to 7 remaining Union Carbide managers (i.e. one died) – but still years away from imprisonment as they are expected to appeal;n- – u20ac1,765 or $2,100 fines handed to Union Carbide managers;n- – poisons continue to leach into the groundwater until this day…nnIs this Ethical?nBUSINESS ETHICS – QUO VADIS?nRobert Blake, a top US state department official urged India not to allow Bhopal to damage warming US-India relations. nDoes this mean Dow Chemical should not be held accountable? nnShould David Cameron point out to Barack Obama that holding BP responsible for the Deepwater Horizon disaster might damage US – UK relations? Inquiring minds would like to know.nnUnion Carbide has stated that its executives were not responsible for the plant’s operation only those of its Indian subsidiary. nBut does the buck not stop with the company’s board? Is the board not ultimately responsible for letting local management be as sloppy as they apparently were in Bhopal, in order to to meet profit targets set by top management and the board in the US?nnQUESTIONnIf BP is held accountable in the US, why not US companies when they are responsible for a disaster like the one in Bhopal?nnNo surprise that the recent court ruling and comments by US officials like Robert Blake (see above) heightens the sense of betrayal for community members.nnMaybe I am naive and this is just a political reality. Meaning, the worth of a US citizen’s livelihood or property, etc is much more than people living in other countries such as UK, India and so forth?

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    @Chris_McGeehan thanks for the BP oil spill feedback. u00a0nnEarly June 10 a court verdict brought the Bhopal disaster’s sorry history sharply to light. nJust to refresh our memory, the deadly poison gas cloud that erupted when water accidentally entered a methyl isocyanate storage tank 26 years ago caused thousands of people to die.nnTo compare that disaster with BP’s Gulf oil spill, here are some statistics I found:nn- – u00a030,000 – maximum estimate of deaths within 8km radius of Union Carbide plant in the Indian city of Bhopal;n- – 325 tonnes of toxic material said to lie at plant sitenn- – u20ac1,765 or $2,100 compensation if a family’s son died or u20ac440 if one’s husband died in the accident n- – u00a0$470m compensation in 1989 paid by Union Carbide, based in Danbury, Connecticut – now part of US national Dow Chemical;nn- – u00a02 years jail terms handed to 7 remaining Union Carbide managers (i.e. one died) – but still years away from imprisonment as they are expected to appeal;n- – u20ac1,765 or $2,100 fines handed to Union Carbide managers;n- – poisons continue to leach into the groundwater until this day…nnIs this Ethical?nBUSINESS ETHICS – QUO VADIS?nRobert Blake, a top US state department official urged India not to allow Bhopal to damage warming US-India relations. nDoes this mean Dow Chemical should not be held accountable? nnShould David Cameron point out to Barack Obama that holding BP responsible for the Deepwater Horizon disaster might damage US – UK relations? Inquiring minds would like to know.nnUnion Carbide has stated that its executives were not responsible for the plant’s operation only those of its Indian subsidiary. nBut does the buck not stop with the company’s board? Is the board not ultimately responsible for letting local management be as sloppy as they apparently were in Bhopal, in order to to meet profit targets set by top management and the board in the US?nnQUESTIONnIf BP is held accountable in the US, why not US companies when they are responsible for a disaster like the one in Bhopal?nnNo surprise that the recent court ruling and comments by US officials like Robert Blake (see above) heightens the sense of betrayal for community members.nnMaybe I am naive and this is just a political reality. Meaning, the worth of a US citizen’s livelihood or property, etc is much more than people living in other countries such as UK, India and so forth?

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    @Chris_McGeehan thanks for the BP oil spill feedback. u00a0nnEarly June 10 a court verdict brought the Bhopal disaster’s sorry history sharply to light. nJust to refresh our memory, the deadly poison gas cloud that erupted when water accidentally entered a methyl isocyanate storage tank 26 years ago caused thousands of people to die.nnTo compare that disaster with BP’s Gulf oil spill, here are some statistics I found:nn- – u00a030,000 – maximum estimate of deaths within 8km radius of Union Carbide plant in the Indian city of Bhopal;n- – 325 tonnes of toxic material said to lie at plant sitenn- – u20ac1,765 or $2,100 compensation if a family’s son died or u20ac440 if one’s husband died in the accident n- – u00a0$470m compensation in 1989 paid by Union Carbide, based in Danbury, Connecticut – now part of US national Dow Chemical;nn- – u00a02 years jail terms handed to 7 remaining Union Carbide managers (i.e. one died) – but still years away from imprisonment as they are expected to appeal;n- – u20ac1,765 or $2,100 fines handed to Union Carbide managers;n- – poisons continue to leach into the groundwater until this day…nnIs this Ethical?nBUSINESS ETHICS – QUO VADIS?nRobert Blake, a top US state department official urged India not to allow Bhopal to damage warming US-India relations. nDoes this mean Dow Chemical should not be held accountable? nnShould David Cameron point out to Barack Obama that holding BP responsible for the Deepwater Horizon disaster might damage US – UK relations? Inquiring minds would like to know.nnUnion Carbide has stated that its executives were not responsible for the plant’s operation only those of its Indian subsidiary. nBut does the buck not stop with the company’s board? Is the board not ultimately responsible for letting local management be as sloppy as they apparently were in Bhopal, in order to to meet profit targets set by top management and the board in the US?nnQUESTIONnIf BP is held accountable in the US, why not US companies when they are responsible for a disaster like the one in Bhopal?nnNo surprise that the recent court ruling and comments by US officials like Robert Blake (see above) heightens the sense of betrayal for community members.nnMaybe I am naive and this is just a political reality. Meaning, the worth of a US citizen’s livelihood or property, etc is much more than people living in other countries such as UK, India and so forth?

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    @Chris_McGeehan thanks for the BP oil spill feedback. u00a0nnEarly June 10 a court verdict brought the Bhopal disaster’s sorry history sharply to light. nJust to refresh our memory, the deadly poison gas cloud that erupted when water accidentally entered a methyl isocyanate storage tank 26 years ago caused thousands of people to die.nnTo compare that disaster with BP’s Gulf oil spill, here are some statistics I found:nn- – u00a030,000 – maximum estimate of deaths within 8km radius of Union Carbide plant in the Indian city of Bhopal;n- – 325 tonnes of toxic material said to lie at plant sitenn- – u20ac1,765 or $2,100 compensation if a family’s son died or u20ac440 if one’s husband died in the accident n- – u00a0$470m compensation in 1989 paid by Union Carbide, based in Danbury, Connecticut – now part of US national Dow Chemical;nn- – u00a02 years jail terms handed to 7 remaining Union Carbide managers (i.e. one died) – but still years away from imprisonment as they are expected to appeal;n- – u20ac1,765 or $2,100 fines handed to Union Carbide managers;n- – poisons continue to leach into the groundwater until this day…nnIs this Ethical?nBUSINESS ETHICS – QUO VADIS?nRobert Blake, a top US state department official urged India not to allow Bhopal to damage warming US-India relations. nDoes this mean Dow Chemical should not be held accountable? nnShould David Cameron point out to Barack Obama that holding BP responsible for the Deepwater Horizon disaster might damage US – UK relations? Inquiring minds would like to know.nnUnion Carbide has stated that its executives were not responsible for the plant’s operation only those of its Indian subsidiary. nBut does the buck not stop with the company’s board? Is the board not ultimately responsible for letting local management be as sloppy as they apparently were in Bhopal, in order to to meet profit targets set by top management and the board in the US?nnQUESTIONnIf BP is held accountable in the US, why not US companies when they are responsible for a disaster like the one in Bhopal?nnNo surprise that the recent court ruling and comments by US officials like Robert Blake (see above) heightens the sense of betrayal for community members.nnMaybe I am naive and this is just a political reality. Meaning, the worth of a US citizen’s livelihood or property, etc is much more than people living in other countries such as UK, India and so forth?

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    @Chris_McGeehan thanks for the BP oil spill feedback. u00a0nnEarly June 10 a court verdict brought the Bhopal disaster’s sorry history sharply to light. nJust to refresh our memory, the deadly poison gas cloud that erupted when water accidentally entered a methyl isocyanate storage tank 26 years ago caused thousands of people to die.nnTo compare that disaster with BP’s Gulf oil spill, here are some statistics I found:nn- – u00a030,000 – maximum estimate of deaths within 8km radius of Union Carbide plant in the Indian city of Bhopal;n- – 325 tonnes of toxic material said to lie at plant sitenn- – u20ac1,765 or $2,100 compensation if a family’s son died or u20ac440 if one’s husband died in the accident n- – u00a0$470m compensation in 1989 paid by Union Carbide, based in Danbury, Connecticut – now part of US national Dow Chemical;nn- – u00a02 years jail terms handed to 7 remaining Union Carbide managers (i.e. one died) – but still years away from imprisonment as they are expected to appeal;n- – u20ac1,765 or $2,100 fines handed to Union Carbide managers;n- – poisons continue to leach into the groundwater until this day…nnIs this Ethical?nBUSINESS ETHICS – QUO VADIS?nRobert Blake, a top US state department official urged India not to allow Bhopal to damage warming US-India relations. nDoes this mean Dow Chemical should not be held accountable? nnShould David Cameron point out to Barack Obama that holding BP responsible for the Deepwater Horizon disaster might damage US – UK relations? Inquiring minds would like to know.nnUnion Carbide has stated that its executives were not responsible for the plant’s operation only those of its Indian subsidiary. nBut does the buck not stop with the company’s board? Is the board not ultimately responsible for letting local management be as sloppy as they apparently were in Bhopal, in order to to meet profit targets set by top management and the board in the US?nnQUESTIONnIf BP is held accountable in the US, why not US companies when they are responsible for a disaster like the one in Bhopal?nnNo surprise that the recent court ruling and comments by US officials like Robert Blake (see above) heightens the sense of betrayal for community members.nnMaybe I am naive and this is just a political reality. Meaning, the worth of a US citizen’s livelihood or property, etc is much more than people living in other countries such as UK, India and so forth?

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    @Chris_McGeehan thanks for the BP oil spill feedback. u00a0nnEarly June 10 a court verdict brought the Bhopal disaster’s sorry history sharply to light. nJust to refresh our memory, the deadly poison gas cloud that erupted when water accidentally entered a methyl isocyanate storage tank 26 years ago caused thousands of people to die.nnTo compare that disaster with BP’s Gulf oil spill, here are some statistics I found:nn- – u00a030,000 – maximum estimate of deaths within 8km radius of Union Carbide plant in the Indian city of Bhopal;n- – 325 tonnes of toxic material said to lie at plant sitenn- – u20ac1,765 or $2,100 compensation if a family’s son died or u20ac440 if one’s husband died in the accident n- – u00a0$470m compensation in 1989 paid by Union Carbide, based in Danbury, Connecticut – now part of US national Dow Chemical;nn- – u00a02 years jail terms handed to 7 remaining Union Carbide managers (i.e. one died) – but still years away from imprisonment as they are expected to appeal;n- – u20ac1,765 or $2,100 fines handed to Union Carbide managers;n- – poisons continue to leach into the groundwater until this day…nnIs this Ethical?nBUSINESS ETHICS – QUO VADIS?nRobert Blake, a top US state department official urged India not to allow Bhopal to damage warming US-India relations. nDoes this mean Dow Chemical should not be held accountable? nnShould David Cameron point out to Barack Obama that holding BP responsible for the Deepwater Horizon disaster might damage US – UK relations? Inquiring minds would like to know.nnUnion Carbide has stated that its executives were not responsible for the plant’s operation only those of its Indian subsidiary. nBut does the buck not stop with the company’s board? Is the board not ultimately responsible for letting local management be as sloppy as they apparently were in Bhopal, in order to to meet profit targets set by top management and the board in the US?nnQUESTIONnIf BP is held accountable in the US, why not US companies when they are responsible for a disaster like the one in Bhopal?nnNo surprise that the recent court ruling and comments by US officials like Robert Blake (see above) heightens the sense of betrayal for community members.nnMaybe I am naive and this is just a political reality. Meaning, the worth of a US citizen’s livelihood or property, etc is much more than people living in other countries such as UK, India and so forth?

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    @Chris_McGeehan thanks for the BP oil spill feedback. u00a0

    Early June 10 a court verdict brought the Bhopal disaster’s sorry history sharply to light.
    Just to refresh our memory, the deadly poison gas cloud that erupted when water accidentally entered a methyl isocyanate storage tank 26 years ago caused thousands of people to die.

    To compare that disaster with BP’s Gulf oil spill, here are some statistics I found:

    - – u00a030,000 – maximum estimate of deaths within 8km radius of Union Carbide plant in the Indian city of Bhopal;
    - – 325 tonnes of toxic material said to lie at plant site

    - – u20ac1,765 or $2,100 compensation if a family’s son died or u20ac440 if one’s husband died in the accident
    - – u00a0$470m compensation in 1989 paid by Union Carbide, based in Danbury, Connecticut – now part of US national Dow Chemical;

    - – u00a02 years jail terms handed to 7 remaining Union Carbide managers (i.e. one died) – but still years away from imprisonment as they are expected to appeal;
    - – u20ac1,765 or $2,100 fines handed to Union Carbide managers;
    - – poisons continue to leach into the groundwater until this day…

    BUSINESS ETHICS – QUO VADIS?
    Robert Blake, a top US state department official urged India not to allow Bhopal to damage warming US-India relations.
    Does this mean Dow Chemical should not be held accountable?

    Should David Cameron point out to Barack Obama that holding BP responsible for the Deepwater Horizon disaster might damage US – UK relations? Inquiring minds would like to know.

    Union Carbide has stated that its executives were not responsible for the plant’s operation only those of its Indian subsidiary.
    But does the buck not stop with the company’s board? Is the board not ultimately responsible for letting local management be as sloppy as they apparently were in Bhopal, in order to to meet profit targets set by top management and the board in the US?

    QUESTION
    If BP is held accountable in the US, why not US companies when they are responsible for a disaster like the one in Bhopal?

    No surprise that the recent court ruling and comments by US officials like Robert Blake (see above) heightens the sense of betrayal for community members.

    Maybe I am naive and this is just a political reality. Meaning, the worth of a US citizen’s livelihood or property, etc is much more than people living in other countries such as UK, India and so forth?

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    @Chris_McGeehan thanks for the BP oil spill feedback. u00a0

    Early June 10 a court verdict brought the Bhopal disaster’s sorry history sharply to light.
    Just to refresh our memory, the deadly poison gas cloud that erupted when water accidentally entered a methyl isocyanate storage tank 26 years ago caused thousands of people to die.

    To compare that disaster with BP’s Gulf oil spill, here are some statistics I found:

    - – u00a030,000 – maximum estimate of deaths within 8km radius of Union Carbide plant in the Indian city of Bhopal;
    - – 325 tonnes of toxic material said to lie at plant site

    - – u20ac1,765 or $2,100 compensation if a family’s son died or u20ac440 if one’s husband died in the accident
    - – u00a0$470m compensation in 1989 paid by Union Carbide, based in Danbury, Connecticut – now part of US national Dow Chemical;

    - – u00a02 years jail terms handed to 7 remaining Union Carbide managers (i.e. one died) – but still years away from imprisonment as they are expected to appeal;
    - – u20ac1,765 or $2,100 fines handed to Union Carbide managers;
    - – poisons continue to leach into the groundwater until this day…

    BUSINESS ETHICS – QUO VADIS?
    Robert Blake, a top US state department official urged India not to allow Bhopal to damage warming US-India relations.
    Does this mean Dow Chemical should not be held accountable?

    Should David Cameron point out to Barack Obama that holding BP responsible for the Deepwater Horizon disaster might damage US – UK relations? Inquiring minds would like to know.

    Union Carbide has stated that its executives were not responsible for the plant’s operation only those of its Indian subsidiary.
    But does the buck not stop with the company’s board? Is the board not ultimately responsible for letting local management be as sloppy as they apparently were in Bhopal, in order to to meet profit targets set by top management and the board in the US?

    QUESTION
    If BP is held accountable in the US, why not US companies when they are responsible for a disaster like the one in Bhopal?

    No surprise that the recent court ruling and comments by US officials like Robert Blake (see above) heightens the sense of betrayal for community members.

    Maybe I am naive and this is just a political reality. Meaning, the worth of a US citizen’s livelihood or property, etc is much more than people living in other countries such as UK, India and so forth?

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    @Chris_McGeehan thanks for the BP oil spill feedback. u00a0

    Early June 10 a court verdict brought the Bhopal disaster’s sorry history sharply to light.
    Just to refresh our memory, the deadly poison gas cloud that erupted when water accidentally entered a methyl isocyanate storage tank 26 years ago caused thousands of people to die.

    To compare that disaster with BP’s Gulf oil spill, here are some statistics I found:

    - – u00a030,000 – maximum estimate of deaths within 8km radius of Union Carbide plant in the Indian city of Bhopal;
    - – 325 tonnes of toxic material said to lie at plant site

    - – u20ac1,765 or $2,100 compensation if a family’s son died or u20ac440 if one’s husband died in the accident
    - – u00a0$470m compensation in 1989 paid by Union Carbide, based in Danbury, Connecticut – now part of US national Dow Chemical;

    - – u00a02 years jail terms handed to 7 remaining Union Carbide managers (i.e. one died) – but still years away from imprisonment as they are expected to appeal;
    - – u20ac1,765 or $2,100 fines handed to Union Carbide managers;
    - – poisons continue to leach into the groundwater until this day…

    BUSINESS ETHICS – QUO VADIS?
    Robert Blake, a top US state department official urged India not to allow Bhopal to damage warming US-India relations.
    Does this mean Dow Chemical should not be held accountable?

    Should David Cameron point out to Barack Obama that holding BP responsible for the Deepwater Horizon disaster might damage US – UK relations? Inquiring minds would like to know.

    Union Carbide has stated that its executives were not responsible for the plant’s operation only those of its Indian subsidiary.
    But does the buck not stop with the company’s board? Is the board not ultimately responsible for letting local management be as sloppy as they apparently were in Bhopal, in order to to meet profit targets set by top management and the board in the US?

    QUESTION
    If BP is held accountable in the US, why not US companies when they are responsible for a disaster like the one in Bhopal?

    No surprise that the recent court ruling and comments by US officials like Robert Blake (see above) heightens the sense of betrayal for community members.

    Maybe I am naive and this is just a political reality. Meaning, the worth of a US citizen’s livelihood or property, etc is much more than people living in other countries such as UK, India and so forth?

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    @Chris_McGeehan thanks for the BP oil spill feedback. u00a0

    Early June 10 a court verdict brought the Bhopal disaster’s sorry history sharply to light.
    Just to refresh our memory, the deadly poison gas cloud that erupted when water accidentally entered a methyl isocyanate storage tank 26 years ago caused thousands of people to die.

    To compare that disaster with BP’s Gulf oil spill, here are some statistics I found:

    - – u00a030,000 – maximum estimate of deaths within 8km radius of Union Carbide plant in the Indian city of Bhopal;
    - – 325 tonnes of toxic material said to lie at plant site

    - – u20ac1,765 or $2,100 compensation if a family’s son died or u20ac440 if one’s husband died in the accident
    - – u00a0$470m compensation in 1989 paid by Union Carbide, based in Danbury, Connecticut – now part of US national Dow Chemical;

    - – u00a02 years jail terms handed to 7 remaining Union Carbide managers (i.e. one died) – but still years away from imprisonment as they are expected to appeal;
    - – u20ac1,765 or $2,100 fines handed to Union Carbide managers;
    - – poisons continue to leach into the groundwater until this day…

    BUSINESS ETHICS – QUO VADIS?
    Robert Blake, a top US state department official urged India not to allow Bhopal to damage warming US-India relations.
    Does this mean Dow Chemical should not be held accountable?

    Should David Cameron point out to Barack Obama that holding BP responsible for the Deepwater Horizon disaster might damage US – UK relations? Inquiring minds would like to know.

    Union Carbide has stated that its executives were not responsible for the plant’s operation only those of its Indian subsidiary.
    But does the buck not stop with the company’s board? Is the board not ultimately responsible for letting local management be as sloppy as they apparently were in Bhopal, in order to to meet profit targets set by top management and the board in the US?

    QUESTION
    If BP is held accountable in the US, why not US companies when they are responsible for a disaster like the one in Bhopal?

    No surprise that the recent court ruling and comments by US officials like Robert Blake (see above) heightens the sense of betrayal for community members.

    Maybe I am naive and this is just a political reality. Meaning, the worth of a US citizen’s livelihood or property, etc is much more than people living in other countries such as UK, India and so forth?

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    @Chris_McGeehan thanks for the BP oil spill feedback. u00a0

    Early June 10 a court verdict brought the Bhopal disaster’s sorry history sharply to light.
    Just to refresh our memory, the deadly poison gas cloud that erupted when water accidentally entered a methyl isocyanate storage tank 26 years ago caused thousands of people to die.

    To compare that disaster with BP’s Gulf oil spill, here are some statistics I found:

    - – u00a030,000 – maximum estimate of deaths within 8km radius of Union Carbide plant in the Indian city of Bhopal;
    - – 325 tonnes of toxic material said to lie at plant site

    - – u20ac1,765 or $2,100 compensation if a family’s son died or u20ac440 if one’s husband died in the accident
    - – u00a0$470m compensation in 1989 paid by Union Carbide, based in Danbury, Connecticut – now part of US national Dow Chemical;

    - – u00a02 years jail terms handed to 7 remaining Union Carbide managers (i.e. one died) – but still years away from imprisonment as they are expected to appeal;
    - – u20ac1,765 or $2,100 fines handed to Union Carbide managers;
    - – poisons continue to leach into the groundwater until this day…

    BUSINESS ETHICS – QUO VADIS?
    Robert Blake, a top US state department official urged India not to allow Bhopal to damage warming US-India relations.
    Does this mean Dow Chemical should not be held accountable?

    Should David Cameron point out to Barack Obama that holding BP responsible for the Deepwater Horizon disaster might damage US – UK relations? Inquiring minds would like to know.

    Union Carbide has stated that its executives were not responsible for the plant’s operation only those of its Indian subsidiary.
    But does the buck not stop with the company’s board? Is the board not ultimately responsible for letting local management be as sloppy as they apparently were in Bhopal, in order to to meet profit targets set by top management and the board in the US?

    QUESTION
    If BP is held accountable in the US, why not US companies when they are responsible for a disaster like the one in Bhopal?

    No surprise that the recent court ruling and comments by US officials like Robert Blake (see above) heightens the sense of betrayal for community members.

    Maybe I am naive and this is just a political reality. Meaning, the worth of a US citizen’s livelihood or property, etc is much more than people living in other countries such as UK, India and so forth?

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    @Chris_McGeehan thanks for the BP oil spill feedback. u00a0

    Early June 10 a court verdict brought the Bhopal disaster’s sorry history sharply to light.
    Just to refresh our memory, the deadly poison gas cloud that erupted when water accidentally entered a methyl isocyanate storage tank 26 years ago caused thousands of people to die.

    To compare that disaster with BP’s Gulf oil spill, here are some statistics I found:

    - – u00a030,000 – maximum estimate of deaths within 8km radius of Union Carbide plant in the Indian city of Bhopal;
    - – 325 tonnes of toxic material said to lie at plant site

    - – u20ac1,765 or $2,100 compensation if a family’s son died or u20ac440 if one’s husband died in the accident
    - – u00a0$470m compensation in 1989 paid by Union Carbide, based in Danbury, Connecticut – now part of US national Dow Chemical;

    - – u00a02 years jail terms handed to 7 remaining Union Carbide managers (i.e. one died) – but still years away from imprisonment as they are expected to appeal;
    - – u20ac1,765 or $2,100 fines handed to Union Carbide managers;
    - – poisons continue to leach into the groundwater until this day…

    BUSINESS ETHICS – QUO VADIS?
    Robert Blake, a top US state department official urged India not to allow Bhopal to damage warming US-India relations.
    Does this mean Dow Chemical should not be held accountable?

    Should David Cameron point out to Barack Obama that holding BP responsible for the Deepwater Horizon disaster might damage US – UK relations? Inquiring minds would like to know.

    Union Carbide has stated that its executives were not responsible for the plant’s operation only those of its Indian subsidiary.
    But does the buck not stop with the company’s board? Is the board not ultimately responsible for letting local management be as sloppy as they apparently were in Bhopal, in order to to meet profit targets set by top management and the board in the US?

    QUESTION
    If BP is held accountable in the US, why not US companies when they are responsible for a disaster like the one in Bhopal?

    No surprise that the recent court ruling and comments by US officials like Robert Blake (see above) heightens the sense of betrayal for community members.

    Maybe I am naive and this is just a political reality. Meaning, the worth of a US citizen’s livelihood or property, etc is much more than people living in other countries such as UK, India and so forth?

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    @Chris_McGeehan thanks for the BP oil spill feedback. u00a0

    Early June 10 a court verdict brought the Bhopal disaster’s sorry history sharply to light.
    Just to refresh our memory, the deadly poison gas cloud that erupted when water accidentally entered a methyl isocyanate storage tank 26 years ago caused thousands of people to die.

    To compare that disaster with BP’s Gulf oil spill, here are some statistics I found:

    - – u00a030,000 – maximum estimate of deaths within 8km radius of Union Carbide plant in the Indian city of Bhopal;
    - – 325 tonnes of toxic material said to lie at plant site

    - – u20ac1,765 or $2,100 compensation if a family’s son died or u20ac440 if one’s husband died in the accident
    - – u00a0$470m compensation in 1989 paid by Union Carbide, based in Danbury, Connecticut – now part of US national Dow Chemical;

    - – u00a02 years jail terms handed to 7 remaining Union Carbide managers (i.e. one died) – but still years away from imprisonment as they are expected to appeal;
    - – u20ac1,765 or $2,100 fines handed to Union Carbide managers;
    - – poisons continue to leach into the groundwater until this day…

    BUSINESS ETHICS – QUO VADIS?
    Robert Blake, a top US state department official urged India not to allow Bhopal to damage warming US-India relations.
    Does this mean Dow Chemical should not be held accountable?

    Should David Cameron point out to Barack Obama that holding BP responsible for the Deepwater Horizon disaster might damage US – UK relations? Inquiring minds would like to know.

    Union Carbide has stated that its executives were not responsible for the plant’s operation only those of its Indian subsidiary.
    But does the buck not stop with the company’s board? Is the board not ultimately responsible for letting local management be as sloppy as they apparently were in Bhopal, in order to to meet profit targets set by top management and the board in the US?

    QUESTION
    If BP is held accountable in the US, why not US companies when they are responsible for a disaster like the one in Bhopal?

    No surprise that the recent court ruling and comments by US officials like Robert Blake (see above) heightens the sense of betrayal for community members.

    Maybe I am naive and this is just a political reality. Meaning, the worth of a US citizen’s livelihood or property, etc is much more than people living in other countries such as UK, India and so forth?

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    @Chris_McGeehan thanks for the BP oil spill feedback. u00a0

    Early June 10 a court verdict brought the Bhopal disaster’s sorry history sharply to light.
    Just to refresh our memory, the deadly poison gas cloud that erupted when water accidentally entered a methyl isocyanate storage tank 26 years ago caused thousands of people to die.

    To compare that disaster with BP’s Gulf oil spill, here are some statistics I found:

    - – u00a030,000 – maximum estimate of deaths within 8km radius of Union Carbide plant in the Indian city of Bhopal;
    - – 325 tonnes of toxic material said to lie at plant site

    - – u20ac1,765 or $2,100 compensation if a family’s son died or u20ac440 if one’s husband died in the accident
    - – u00a0$470m compensation in 1989 paid by Union Carbide, based in Danbury, Connecticut – now part of US national Dow Chemical;

    - – u00a02 years jail terms handed to 7 remaining Union Carbide managers (i.e. one died) – but still years away from imprisonment as they are expected to appeal;
    - – u20ac1,765 or $2,100 fines handed to Union Carbide managers;
    - – poisons continue to leach into the groundwater until this day…

    BUSINESS ETHICS – QUO VADIS?
    Robert Blake, a top US state department official urged India not to allow Bhopal to damage warming US-India relations.
    Does this mean Dow Chemical should not be held accountable?

    Should David Cameron point out to Barack Obama that holding BP responsible for the Deepwater Horizon disaster might damage US – UK relations? Inquiring minds would like to know.

    Union Carbide has stated that its executives were not responsible for the plant’s operation only those of its Indian subsidiary.
    But does the buck not stop with the company’s board? Is the board not ultimately responsible for letting local management be as sloppy as they apparently were in Bhopal, in order to to meet profit targets set by top management and the board in the US?

    QUESTION
    If BP is held accountable in the US, why not US companies when they are responsible for a disaster like the one in Bhopal?

    No surprise that the recent court ruling and comments by US officials like Robert Blake (see above) heightens the sense of betrayal for community members.

    Maybe I am naive and this is just a political reality. Meaning, the worth of a US citizen’s livelihood or property, etc is much more than people living in other countries such as UK, India and so forth?

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    @Chris_McGeehan thanks for the BP oil spill feedback. u00a0

    Early June 10 a court verdict brought the Bhopal disaster’s sorry history sharply to light.
    Just to refresh our memory, the deadly poison gas cloud that erupted when water accidentally entered a methyl isocyanate storage tank 26 years ago caused thousands of people to die.

    To compare that disaster with BP’s Gulf oil spill, here are some statistics I found:

    - – u00a030,000 – maximum estimate of deaths within 8km radius of Union Carbide plant in the Indian city of Bhopal;
    - – 325 tonnes of toxic material said to lie at plant site

    - – u20ac1,765 or $2,100 compensation if a family’s son died or u20ac440 if one’s husband died in the accident
    - – u00a0$470m compensation in 1989 paid by Union Carbide, based in Danbury, Connecticut – now part of US national Dow Chemical;

    - – u00a02 years jail terms handed to 7 remaining Union Carbide managers (i.e. one died) – but still years away from imprisonment as they are expected to appeal;
    - – u20ac1,765 or $2,100 fines handed to Union Carbide managers;
    - – poisons continue to leach into the groundwater until this day…

    BUSINESS ETHICS – QUO VADIS?
    Robert Blake, a top US state department official urged India not to allow Bhopal to damage warming US-India relations.
    Does this mean Dow Chemical should not be held accountable?

    Should David Cameron point out to Barack Obama that holding BP responsible for the Deepwater Horizon disaster might damage US – UK relations? Inquiring minds would like to know.

    Union Carbide has stated that its executives were not responsible for the plant’s operation only those of its Indian subsidiary.
    But does the buck not stop with the company’s board? Is the board not ultimately responsible for letting local management be as sloppy as they apparently were in Bhopal, in order to to meet profit targets set by top management and the board in the US?

    QUESTION
    If BP is held accountable in the US, why not US companies when they are responsible for a disaster like the one in Bhopal?

    No surprise that the recent court ruling and comments by US officials like Robert Blake (see above) heightens the sense of betrayal for community members.

    Maybe I am naive and this is just a political reality. Meaning, the worth of a US citizen’s livelihood or property, etc is much more than people living in other countries such as UK, India and so forth?

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    @Chris_McGeehan thanks for the BP oil spill feedback. u00a0

    Early June 10 a court verdict brought the Bhopal disaster’s sorry history sharply to light.
    Just to refresh our memory, the deadly poison gas cloud that erupted when water accidentally entered a methyl isocyanate storage tank 26 years ago caused thousands of people to die.

    To compare that disaster with BP’s Gulf oil spill, here are some statistics I found:

    - – u00a030,000 – maximum estimate of deaths within 8km radius of Union Carbide plant in the Indian city of Bhopal;
    - – 325 tonnes of toxic material said to lie at plant site

    - – u20ac1,765 or $2,100 compensation if a family’s son died or u20ac440 if one’s husband died in the accident
    - – u00a0$470m compensation in 1989 paid by Union Carbide, based in Danbury, Connecticut – now part of US national Dow Chemical;

    - – u00a02 years jail terms handed to 7 remaining Union Carbide managers (i.e. one died) – but still years away from imprisonment as they are expected to appeal;
    - – u20ac1,765 or $2,100 fines handed to Union Carbide managers;
    - – poisons continue to leach into the groundwater until this day…

    BUSINESS ETHICS – QUO VADIS?
    Robert Blake, a top US state department official urged India not to allow Bhopal to damage warming US-India relations.
    Does this mean Dow Chemical should not be held accountable?

    Should David Cameron point out to Barack Obama that holding BP responsible for the Deepwater Horizon disaster might damage US – UK relations? Inquiring minds would like to know.

    Union Carbide has stated that its executives were not responsible for the plant’s operation only those of its Indian subsidiary.
    But does the buck not stop with the company’s board? Is the board not ultimately responsible for letting local management be as sloppy as they apparently were in Bhopal, in order to to meet profit targets set by top management and the board in the US?

    QUESTION
    If BP is held accountable in the US, why not US companies when they are responsible for a disaster like the one in Bhopal?

    No surprise that the recent court ruling and comments by US officials like Robert Blake (see above) heightens the sense of betrayal for community members.

    Maybe I am naive and this is just a political reality. Meaning, the worth of a US citizen’s livelihood or property, etc is much more than people living in other countries such as UK, India and so forth?

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    @Chris_McGeehan thanks for the BP oil spill feedback. u00a0

    Early June 10 a court verdict brought the Bhopal disaster’s sorry history sharply to light.
    Just to refresh our memory, the deadly poison gas cloud that erupted when water accidentally entered a methyl isocyanate storage tank 26 years ago caused thousands of people to die.

    To compare that disaster with BP’s Gulf oil spill, here are some statistics I found:

    - – u00a030,000 – maximum estimate of deaths within 8km radius of Union Carbide plant in the Indian city of Bhopal;
    - – 325 tonnes of toxic material said to lie at plant site

    - – u20ac1,765 or $2,100 compensation if a family’s son died or u20ac440 if one’s husband died in the accident
    - – u00a0$470m compensation in 1989 paid by Union Carbide, based in Danbury, Connecticut – now part of US national Dow Chemical;

    - – u00a02 years jail terms handed to 7 remaining Union Carbide managers (i.e. one died) – but still years away from imprisonment as they are expected to appeal;
    - – u20ac1,765 or $2,100 fines handed to Union Carbide managers;
    - – poisons continue to leach into the groundwater until this day…

    BUSINESS ETHICS – QUO VADIS?
    Robert Blake, a top US state department official urged India not to allow Bhopal to damage warming US-India relations.
    Does this mean Dow Chemical should not be held accountable?

    Should David Cameron point out to Barack Obama that holding BP responsible for the Deepwater Horizon disaster might damage US – UK relations? Inquiring minds would like to know.

    Union Carbide has stated that its executives were not responsible for the plant’s operation only those of its Indian subsidiary.
    But does the buck not stop with the company’s board? Is the board not ultimately responsible for letting local management be as sloppy as they apparently were in Bhopal, in order to to meet profit targets set by top management and the board in the US?

    QUESTION
    If BP is held accountable in the US, why not US companies when they are responsible for a disaster like the one in Bhopal?

    No surprise that the recent court ruling and comments by US officials like Robert Blake (see above) heightens the sense of betrayal for community members.

    Maybe I am naive and this is just a political reality. Meaning, the worth of a US citizen’s livelihood or property, etc is much more than people living in other countries such as UK, India and so forth?

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    @Chris_McGeehan thanks for the BP oil spill feedback. u00a0

    Early June 10 a court verdict brought the Bhopal disaster’s sorry history sharply to light.
    Just to refresh our memory, the deadly poison gas cloud that erupted when water accidentally entered a methyl isocyanate storage tank 26 years ago caused thousands of people to die.

    To compare that disaster with BP’s Gulf oil spill, here are some statistics I found:

    - – u00a030,000 – maximum estimate of deaths within 8km radius of Union Carbide plant in the Indian city of Bhopal;
    - – 325 tonnes of toxic material said to lie at plant site

    - – u20ac1,765 or $2,100 compensation if a family’s son died or u20ac440 if one’s husband died in the accident
    - – u00a0$470m compensation in 1989 paid by Union Carbide, based in Danbury, Connecticut – now part of US national Dow Chemical;

    - – u00a02 years jail terms handed to 7 remaining Union Carbide managers (i.e. one died) – but still years away from imprisonment as they are expected to appeal;
    - – u20ac1,765 or $2,100 fines handed to Union Carbide managers;
    - – poisons continue to leach into the groundwater until this day…

    BUSINESS ETHICS – QUO VADIS?
    Robert Blake, a top US state department official urged India not to allow Bhopal to damage warming US-India relations.
    Does this mean Dow Chemical should not be held accountable?

    Should David Cameron point out to Barack Obama that holding BP responsible for the Deepwater Horizon disaster might damage US – UK relations? Inquiring minds would like to know.

    Union Carbide has stated that its executives were not responsible for the plant’s operation only those of its Indian subsidiary.
    But does the buck not stop with the company’s board? Is the board not ultimately responsible for letting local management be as sloppy as they apparently were in Bhopal, in order to to meet profit targets set by top management and the board in the US?

    QUESTION
    If BP is held accountable in the US, why not US companies when they are responsible for a disaster like the one in Bhopal?

    No surprise that the recent court ruling and comments by US officials like Robert Blake (see above) heightens the sense of betrayal for community members.

    Maybe I am naive and this is just a political reality. Meaning, the worth of a US citizen’s livelihood or property, etc is much more than people living in other countries such as UK, India and so forth?

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    @Chris_McGeehan thanks for the BP oil spill feedback. u00a0

    Early June 10 a court verdict brought the Bhopal disaster’s sorry history sharply to light.
    Just to refresh our memory, the deadly poison gas cloud that erupted when water accidentally entered a methyl isocyanate storage tank 26 years ago caused thousands of people to die.

    To compare that disaster with BP’s Gulf oil spill, here are some statistics I found:

    - – u00a030,000 – maximum estimate of deaths within 8km radius of Union Carbide plant in the Indian city of Bhopal;
    - – 325 tonnes of toxic material said to lie at plant site

    - – u20ac1,765 or $2,100 compensation if a family’s son died or u20ac440 if one’s husband died in the accident
    - – u00a0$470m compensation in 1989 paid by Union Carbide, based in Danbury, Connecticut – now part of US national Dow Chemical;

    - – u00a02 years jail terms handed to 7 remaining Union Carbide managers (i.e. one died) – but still years away from imprisonment as they are expected to appeal;
    - – u20ac1,765 or $2,100 fines handed to Union Carbide managers;
    - – poisons continue to leach into the groundwater until this day…

    BUSINESS ETHICS – QUO VADIS?
    Robert Blake, a top US state department official urged India not to allow Bhopal to damage warming US-India relations.
    Does this mean Dow Chemical should not be held accountable?

    Should David Cameron point out to Barack Obama that holding BP responsible for the Deepwater Horizon disaster might damage US – UK relations? Inquiring minds would like to know.

    Union Carbide has stated that its executives were not responsible for the plant’s operation only those of its Indian subsidiary.
    But does the buck not stop with the company’s board? Is the board not ultimately responsible for letting local management be as sloppy as they apparently were in Bhopal, in order to to meet profit targets set by top management and the board in the US?

    QUESTION
    If BP is held accountable in the US, why not US companies when they are responsible for a disaster like the one in Bhopal?

    No surprise that the recent court ruling and comments by US officials like Robert Blake (see above) heightens the sense of betrayal for community members.

    Maybe I am naive and this is just a political reality. Meaning, the worth of a US citizen’s livelihood or property, etc is much more than people living in other countries such as UK, India and so forth?

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    @Chris_McGeehan thanks for the BP oil spill feedback. u00a0

    Early June 10 a court verdict brought the Bhopal disaster’s sorry history sharply to light.
    Just to refresh our memory, the deadly poison gas cloud that erupted when water accidentally entered a methyl isocyanate storage tank 26 years ago caused thousands of people to die.

    To compare that disaster with BP’s Gulf oil spill, here are some statistics I found:

    - – u00a030,000 – maximum estimate of deaths within 8km radius of Union Carbide plant in the Indian city of Bhopal;
    - – 325 tonnes of toxic material said to lie at plant site

    - – u20ac1,765 or $2,100 compensation if a family’s son died or u20ac440 if one’s husband died in the accident
    - – u00a0$470m compensation in 1989 paid by Union Carbide, based in Danbury, Connecticut – now part of US national Dow Chemical;

    - – u00a02 years jail terms handed to 7 remaining Union Carbide managers (i.e. one died) – but still years away from imprisonment as they are expected to appeal;
    - – u20ac1,765 or $2,100 fines handed to Union Carbide managers;
    - – poisons continue to leach into the groundwater until this day…

    BUSINESS ETHICS – QUO VADIS?
    Robert Blake, a top US state department official urged India not to allow Bhopal to damage warming US-India relations.
    Does this mean Dow Chemical should not be held accountable?

    Should David Cameron point out to Barack Obama that holding BP responsible for the Deepwater Horizon disaster might damage US – UK relations? Inquiring minds would like to know.

    Union Carbide has stated that its executives were not responsible for the plant’s operation only those of its Indian subsidiary.
    But does the buck not stop with the company’s board? Is the board not ultimately responsible for letting local management be as sloppy as they apparently were in Bhopal, in order to to meet profit targets set by top management and the board in the US?

    QUESTION
    If BP is held accountable in the US, why not US companies when they are responsible for a disaster like the one in Bhopal?

    No surprise that the recent court ruling and comments by US officials like Robert Blake (see above) heightens the sense of betrayal for community members.

    Maybe I am naive and this is just a political reality. Meaning, the worth of a US citizen’s livelihood or property, etc is much more than people living in other countries such as UK, India and so forth?

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    @Chris_McGeehan thanks for the BP oil spill feedback. u00a0

    Early June 10 a court verdict brought the Bhopal disaster’s sorry history sharply to light.
    Just to refresh our memory, the deadly poison gas cloud that erupted when water accidentally entered a methyl isocyanate storage tank 26 years ago caused thousands of people to die.

    To compare that disaster with BP’s Gulf oil spill, here are some statistics I found:

    - – u00a030,000 – maximum estimate of deaths within 8km radius of Union Carbide plant in the Indian city of Bhopal;
    - – 325 tonnes of toxic material said to lie at plant site

    - – u20ac1,765 or $2,100 compensation if a family’s son died or u20ac440 if one’s husband died in the accident
    - – u00a0$470m compensation in 1989 paid by Union Carbide, based in Danbury, Connecticut – now part of US national Dow Chemical;

    - – u00a02 years jail terms handed to 7 remaining Union Carbide managers (i.e. one died) – but still years away from imprisonment as they are expected to appeal;
    - – u20ac1,765 or $2,100 fines handed to Union Carbide managers;
    - – poisons continue to leach into the groundwater until this day…

    BUSINESS ETHICS – QUO VADIS?
    Robert Blake, a top US state department official urged India not to allow Bhopal to damage warming US-India relations.
    Does this mean Dow Chemical should not be held accountable?

    Should David Cameron point out to Barack Obama that holding BP responsible for the Deepwater Horizon disaster might damage US – UK relations? Inquiring minds would like to know.

    Union Carbide has stated that its executives were not responsible for the plant’s operation only those of its Indian subsidiary.
    But does the buck not stop with the company’s board? Is the board not ultimately responsible for letting local management be as sloppy as they apparently were in Bhopal, in order to to meet profit targets set by top management and the board in the US?

    QUESTION
    If BP is held accountable in the US, why not US companies when they are responsible for a disaster like the one in Bhopal?

    No surprise that the recent court ruling and comments by US officials like Robert Blake (see above) heightens the sense of betrayal for community members.

    Maybe I am naive and this is just a political reality. Meaning, the worth of a US citizen’s livelihood or property, etc is much more than people living in other countries such as UK, India and so forth?

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    @Chris_McGeehan thanks for the BP oil spill feedback. u00a0

    Early June 10 a court verdict brought the Bhopal disaster’s sorry history sharply to light.
    Just to refresh our memory, the deadly poison gas cloud that erupted when water accidentally entered a methyl isocyanate storage tank 26 years ago caused thousands of people to die.

    To compare that disaster with BP’s Gulf oil spill, here are some statistics I found:

    - – u00a030,000 – maximum estimate of deaths within 8km radius of Union Carbide plant in the Indian city of Bhopal;
    - – 325 tonnes of toxic material said to lie at plant site

    - – u20ac1,765 or $2,100 compensation if a family’s son died or u20ac440 if one’s husband died in the accident
    - – u00a0$470m compensation in 1989 paid by Union Carbide, based in Danbury, Connecticut – now part of US national Dow Chemical;

    - – u00a02 years jail terms handed to 7 remaining Union Carbide managers (i.e. one died) – but still years away from imprisonment as they are expected to appeal;
    - – u20ac1,765 or $2,100 fines handed to Union Carbide managers;
    - – poisons continue to leach into the groundwater until this day…

    BUSINESS ETHICS – QUO VADIS?
    Robert Blake, a top US state department official urged India not to allow Bhopal to damage warming US-India relations.
    Does this mean Dow Chemical should not be held accountable?

    Should David Cameron point out to Barack Obama that holding BP responsible for the Deepwater Horizon disaster might damage US – UK relations? Inquiring minds would like to know.

    Union Carbide has stated that its executives were not responsible for the plant’s operation only those of its Indian subsidiary.
    But does the buck not stop with the company’s board? Is the board not ultimately responsible for letting local management be as sloppy as they apparently were in Bhopal, in order to to meet profit targets set by top management and the board in the US?

    QUESTION
    If BP is held accountable in the US, why not US companies when they are responsible for a disaster like the one in Bhopal?

    No surprise that the recent court ruling and comments by US officials like Robert Blake (see above) heightens the sense of betrayal for community members.

    Maybe I am naive and this is just a political reality. Meaning, the worth of a US citizen’s livelihood or property, etc is much more than people living in other countries such as UK, India and so forth?

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    @Chris_McGeehan thanks for the BP oil spill feedback. u00a0

    Early June 10 a court verdict brought the Bhopal disaster’s sorry history sharply to light.
    Just to refresh our memory, the deadly poison gas cloud that erupted when water accidentally entered a methyl isocyanate storage tank 26 years ago caused thousands of people to die.

    To compare that disaster with BP’s Gulf oil spill, here are some statistics I found:

    - – u00a030,000 – maximum estimate of deaths within 8km radius of Union Carbide plant in the Indian city of Bhopal;
    - – 325 tonnes of toxic material said to lie at plant site

    - – u20ac1,765 or $2,100 compensation if a family’s son died or u20ac440 if one’s husband died in the accident
    - – u00a0$470m compensation in 1989 paid by Union Carbide, based in Danbury, Connecticut – now part of US national Dow Chemical;

    - – u00a02 years jail terms handed to 7 remaining Union Carbide managers (i.e. one died) – but still years away from imprisonment as they are expected to appeal;
    - – u20ac1,765 or $2,100 fines handed to Union Carbide managers;
    - – poisons continue to leach into the groundwater until this day…

    BUSINESS ETHICS – QUO VADIS?
    Robert Blake, a top US state department official urged India not to allow Bhopal to damage warming US-India relations.
    Does this mean Dow Chemical should not be held accountable?

    Should David Cameron point out to Barack Obama that holding BP responsible for the Deepwater Horizon disaster might damage US – UK relations? Inquiring minds would like to know.

    Union Carbide has stated that its executives were not responsible for the plant’s operation only those of its Indian subsidiary.
    But does the buck not stop with the company’s board? Is the board not ultimately responsible for letting local management be as sloppy as they apparently were in Bhopal, in order to to meet profit targets set by top management and the board in the US?

    QUESTION
    If BP is held accountable in the US, why not US companies when they are responsible for a disaster like the one in Bhopal?

    No surprise that the recent court ruling and comments by US officials like Robert Blake (see above) heightens the sense of betrayal for community members.

    Maybe I am naive and this is just a political reality. Meaning, the worth of a US citizen’s livelihood or property, etc is much more than people living in other countries such as UK, India and so forth?

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    @Chris_McGeehan thanks for the BP oil spill feedback. u00a0

    Early June 10 a court verdict brought the Bhopal disaster’s sorry history sharply to light.
    Just to refresh our memory, the deadly poison gas cloud that erupted when water accidentally entered a methyl isocyanate storage tank 26 years ago caused thousands of people to die.

    To compare that disaster with BP’s Gulf oil spill, here are some statistics I found:

    - – u00a030,000 – maximum estimate of deaths within 8km radius of Union Carbide plant in the Indian city of Bhopal;
    - – 325 tonnes of toxic material said to lie at plant site

    - – u20ac1,765 or $2,100 compensation if a family’s son died or u20ac440 if one’s husband died in the accident
    - – u00a0$470m compensation in 1989 paid by Union Carbide, based in Danbury, Connecticut – now part of US national Dow Chemical;

    - – u00a02 years jail terms handed to 7 remaining Union Carbide managers (i.e. one died) – but still years away from imprisonment as they are expected to appeal;
    - – u20ac1,765 or $2,100 fines handed to Union Carbide managers;
    - – poisons continue to leach into the groundwater until this day…

    BUSINESS ETHICS – QUO VADIS?
    Robert Blake, a top US state department official urged India not to allow Bhopal to damage warming US-India relations.
    Does this mean Dow Chemical should not be held accountable?

    Should David Cameron point out to Barack Obama that holding BP responsible for the Deepwater Horizon disaster might damage US – UK relations? Inquiring minds would like to know.

    Union Carbide has stated that its executives were not responsible for the plant’s operation only those of its Indian subsidiary.
    But does the buck not stop with the company’s board? Is the board not ultimately responsible for letting local management be as sloppy as they apparently were in Bhopal, in order to to meet profit targets set by top management and the board in the US?

    QUESTION
    If BP is held accountable in the US, why not US companies when they are responsible for a disaster like the one in Bhopal?

    No surprise that the recent court ruling and comments by US officials like Robert Blake (see above) heightens the sense of betrayal for community members.

    Maybe I am naive and this is just a political reality. Meaning, the worth of a US citizen’s livelihood or property, etc is much more than people living in other countries such as UK, India and so forth?

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    @Chris_McGeehan thanks for the BP oil spill feedback. u00a0

    Early June 10 a court verdict brought the Bhopal disaster’s sorry history sharply to light.
    Just to refresh our memory, the deadly poison gas cloud that erupted when water accidentally entered a methyl isocyanate storage tank 26 years ago caused thousands of people to die.

    To compare that disaster with BP’s Gulf oil spill, here are some statistics I found:

    - – u00a030,000 – maximum estimate of deaths within 8km radius of Union Carbide plant in the Indian city of Bhopal;
    - – 325 tonnes of toxic material said to lie at plant site

    - – u20ac1,765 or $2,100 compensation if a family’s son died or u20ac440 if one’s husband died in the accident
    - – u00a0$470m compensation in 1989 paid by Union Carbide, based in Danbury, Connecticut – now part of US national Dow Chemical;

    - – u00a02 years jail terms handed to 7 remaining Union Carbide managers (i.e. one died) – but still years away from imprisonment as they are expected to appeal;
    - – u20ac1,765 or $2,100 fines handed to Union Carbide managers;
    - – poisons continue to leach into the groundwater until this day…

    BUSINESS ETHICS – QUO VADIS?
    Robert Blake, a top US state department official urged India not to allow Bhopal to damage warming US-India relations.
    Does this mean Dow Chemical should not be held accountable?

    Should David Cameron point out to Barack Obama that holding BP responsible for the Deepwater Horizon disaster might damage US – UK relations? Inquiring minds would like to know.

    Union Carbide has stated that its executives were not responsible for the plant’s operation only those of its Indian subsidiary.
    But does the buck not stop with the company’s board? Is the board not ultimately responsible for letting local management be as sloppy as they apparently were in Bhopal, in order to to meet profit targets set by top management and the board in the US?

    QUESTION
    If BP is held accountable in the US, why not US companies when they are responsible for a disaster like the one in Bhopal?

    No surprise that the recent court ruling and comments by US officials like Robert Blake (see above) heightens the sense of betrayal for community members.

    Maybe I am naive and this is just a political reality. Meaning, the worth of a US citizen’s livelihood or property, etc is much more than people living in other countries such as UK, India and so forth?

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    @Chris_McGeehan thanks for the BP oil spill feedback. u00a0

    Early June 10 a court verdict brought the Bhopal disaster’s sorry history sharply to light.
    Just to refresh our memory, the deadly poison gas cloud that erupted when water accidentally entered a methyl isocyanate storage tank 26 years ago caused thousands of people to die.

    To compare that disaster with BP’s Gulf oil spill, here are some statistics I found:

    - – u00a030,000 – maximum estimate of deaths within 8km radius of Union Carbide plant in the Indian city of Bhopal;
    - – 325 tonnes of toxic material said to lie at plant site

    - – u20ac1,765 or $2,100 compensation if a family’s son died or u20ac440 if one’s husband died in the accident
    - – u00a0$470m compensation in 1989 paid by Union Carbide, based in Danbury, Connecticut – now part of US national Dow Chemical;

    - – u00a02 years jail terms handed to 7 remaining Union Carbide managers (i.e. one died) – but still years away from imprisonment as they are expected to appeal;
    - – u20ac1,765 or $2,100 fines handed to Union Carbide managers;
    - – poisons continue to leach into the groundwater until this day…

    BUSINESS ETHICS – QUO VADIS?
    Robert Blake, a top US state department official urged India not to allow Bhopal to damage warming US-India relations.
    Does this mean Dow Chemical should not be held accountable?

    Should David Cameron point out to Barack Obama that holding BP responsible for the Deepwater Horizon disaster might damage US – UK relations? Inquiring minds would like to know.

    Union Carbide has stated that its executives were not responsible for the plant’s operation only those of its Indian subsidiary.
    But does the buck not stop with the company’s board? Is the board not ultimately responsible for letting local management be as sloppy as they apparently were in Bhopal, in order to to meet profit targets set by top management and the board in the US?

    QUESTION
    If BP is held accountable in the US, why not US companies when they are responsible for a disaster like the one in Bhopal?

    No surprise that the recent court ruling and comments by US officials like Robert Blake (see above) heightens the sense of betrayal for community members.

    Maybe I am naive and this is just a political reality. Meaning, the worth of a US citizen’s livelihood or property, etc is much more than people living in other countries such as UK, India and so forth?

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    @Chris_McGeehan thanks for the BP oil spill feedback. u00a0

    Early June 10 a court verdict brought the Bhopal disaster’s sorry history sharply to light.
    Just to refresh our memory, the deadly poison gas cloud that erupted when water accidentally entered a methyl isocyanate storage tank 26 years ago caused thousands of people to die.

    To compare that disaster with BP’s Gulf oil spill, here are some statistics I found:

    - – u00a030,000 – maximum estimate of deaths within 8km radius of Union Carbide plant in the Indian city of Bhopal;
    - – 325 tonnes of toxic material said to lie at plant site

    - – u20ac1,765 or $2,100 compensation if a family’s son died or u20ac440 if one’s husband died in the accident
    - – u00a0$470m compensation in 1989 paid by Union Carbide, based in Danbury, Connecticut – now part of US national Dow Chemical;

    - – u00a02 years jail terms handed to 7 remaining Union Carbide managers (i.e. one died) – but still years away from imprisonment as they are expected to appeal;
    - – u20ac1,765 or $2,100 fines handed to Union Carbide managers;
    - – poisons continue to leach into the groundwater until this day…

    BUSINESS ETHICS – QUO VADIS?
    Robert Blake, a top US state department official urged India not to allow Bhopal to damage warming US-India relations.
    Does this mean Dow Chemical should not be held accountable?

    Should David Cameron point out to Barack Obama that holding BP responsible for the Deepwater Horizon disaster might damage US – UK relations? Inquiring minds would like to know.

    Union Carbide has stated that its executives were not responsible for the plant’s operation only those of its Indian subsidiary.
    But does the buck not stop with the company’s board? Is the board not ultimately responsible for letting local management be as sloppy as they apparently were in Bhopal, in order to to meet profit targets set by top management and the board in the US?

    QUESTION
    If BP is held accountable in the US, why not US companies when they are responsible for a disaster like the one in Bhopal?

    No surprise that the recent court ruling and comments by US officials like Robert Blake (see above) heightens the sense of betrayal for community members.

    Maybe I am naive and this is just a political reality. Meaning, the worth of a US citizen’s livelihood or property, etc is much more than people living in other countries such as UK, India and so forth?

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    @Chris_McGeehan thanks for the BP oil spill feedback. u00a0

    Early June 10 a court verdict brought the Bhopal disaster’s sorry history sharply to light.
    Just to refresh our memory, the deadly poison gas cloud that erupted when water accidentally entered a methyl isocyanate storage tank 26 years ago caused thousands of people to die.

    To compare that disaster with BP’s Gulf oil spill, here are some statistics I found:

    - – u00a030,000 – maximum estimate of deaths within 8km radius of Union Carbide plant in the Indian city of Bhopal;
    - – 325 tonnes of toxic material said to lie at plant site

    - – u20ac1,765 or $2,100 compensation if a family’s son died or u20ac440 if one’s husband died in the accident
    - – u00a0$470m compensation in 1989 paid by Union Carbide, based in Danbury, Connecticut – now part of US national Dow Chemical;

    - – u00a02 years jail terms handed to 7 remaining Union Carbide managers (i.e. one died) – but still years away from imprisonment as they are expected to appeal;
    - – u20ac1,765 or $2,100 fines handed to Union Carbide managers;
    - – poisons continue to leach into the groundwater until this day…

    BUSINESS ETHICS – QUO VADIS?
    Robert Blake, a top US state department official urged India not to allow Bhopal to damage warming US-India relations.
    Does this mean Dow Chemical should not be held accountable?

    Should David Cameron point out to Barack Obama that holding BP responsible for the Deepwater Horizon disaster might damage US – UK relations? Inquiring minds would like to know.

    Union Carbide has stated that its executives were not responsible for the plant’s operation only those of its Indian subsidiary.
    But does the buck not stop with the company’s board? Is the board not ultimately responsible for letting local management be as sloppy as they apparently were in Bhopal, in order to to meet profit targets set by top management and the board in the US?

    QUESTION
    If BP is held accountable in the US, why not US companies when they are responsible for a disaster like the one in Bhopal?

    No surprise that the recent court ruling and comments by US officials like Robert Blake (see above) heightens the sense of betrayal for community members.

    Maybe I am naive and this is just a political reality. Meaning, the worth of a US citizen’s livelihood or property, etc is much more than people living in other countries such as UK, India and so forth?

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    @Chris_McGeehan thanks for the BP oil spill feedback. u00a0

    Early June 10 a court verdict brought the Bhopal disaster’s sorry history sharply to light.
    Just to refresh our memory, the deadly poison gas cloud that erupted when water accidentally entered a methyl isocyanate storage tank 26 years ago caused thousands of people to die.

    To compare that disaster with BP’s Gulf oil spill, here are some statistics I found:

    - – u00a030,000 – maximum estimate of deaths within 8km radius of Union Carbide plant in the Indian city of Bhopal;
    - – 325 tonnes of toxic material said to lie at plant site

    - – u20ac1,765 or $2,100 compensation if a family’s son died or u20ac440 if one’s husband died in the accident
    - – u00a0$470m compensation in 1989 paid by Union Carbide, based in Danbury, Connecticut – now part of US national Dow Chemical;

    - – u00a02 years jail terms handed to 7 remaining Union Carbide managers (i.e. one died) – but still years away from imprisonment as they are expected to appeal;
    - – u20ac1,765 or $2,100 fines handed to Union Carbide managers;
    - – poisons continue to leach into the groundwater until this day…

    BUSINESS ETHICS – QUO VADIS?
    Robert Blake, a top US state department official urged India not to allow Bhopal to damage warming US-India relations.
    Does this mean Dow Chemical should not be held accountable?

    Should David Cameron point out to Barack Obama that holding BP responsible for the Deepwater Horizon disaster might damage US – UK relations? Inquiring minds would like to know.

    Union Carbide has stated that its executives were not responsible for the plant’s operation only those of its Indian subsidiary.
    But does the buck not stop with the company’s board? Is the board not ultimately responsible for letting local management be as sloppy as they apparently were in Bhopal, in order to to meet profit targets set by top management and the board in the US?

    QUESTION
    If BP is held accountable in the US, why not US companies when they are responsible for a disaster like the one in Bhopal?

    No surprise that the recent court ruling and comments by US officials like Robert Blake (see above) heightens the sense of betrayal for community members.

    Maybe I am naive and this is just a political reality. Meaning, the worth of a US citizen’s livelihood or property, etc is much more than people living in other countries such as UK, India and so forth?

  • http://My.ComMetrics.com Urs E. Gattiker

    @Chris_McGeehan thanks for the BP oil spill feedback.  

    Early June 10 a court verdict brought the Bhopal disaster's sorry history sharply to light.
    Just to refresh our memory, the deadly poison gas cloud that erupted when water accidentally entered a methyl isocyanate storage tank 26 years ago caused thousands of people to die.

    To compare that disaster with BP's Gulf oil spill, here are some statistics I found:

    - –  30,000 – maximum estimate of deaths within 8km radius of Union Carbide plant in the Indian city of Bhopal;
    - – 325 tonnes of toxic material said to lie at plant site

    - – €1,765 or $2,100 compensation if a family's son died or €440 if one's husband died in the accident
    - –  $470m compensation in 1989 paid by Union Carbide, based in Danbury, Connecticut – now part of US national Dow Chemical;

    - –  2 years jail terms handed to 7 remaining Union Carbide managers (i.e. one died) – but still years away from imprisonment as they are expected to appeal;
    - – €1,765 or $2,100 fines handed to Union Carbide managers;
    - – poisons continue to leach into the groundwater until this day…

    Is this Ethical?
    BUSINESS ETHICS – QUO VADIS?
    Robert Blake, a top US state department official urged India not to allow Bhopal to damage warming US-India relations.
    Does this mean Dow Chemical should not be held accountable?

    Should David Cameron point out to Barack Obama that holding BP responsible for the Deepwater Horizon disaster might damage US – UK relations? Inquiring minds would like to know.

    Union Carbide has stated that its executives were not responsible for the plant's operation only those of its Indian subsidiary.
    But does the buck not stop with the company's board? Is the board not ultimately responsible for letting local management be as sloppy as they apparently were in Bhopal, in order to to meet profit targets set by top management and the board in the US?

    QUESTION
    If BP is held accountable in the US, why not US companies when they are responsible for a disaster like the one in Bhopal?

    No surprise that the recent court ruling and comments by US officials like Robert Blake (see above) heightens the sense of betrayal for community members.

    Maybe I am naive and this is just a political reality. Meaning, the worth of a US citizen's livelihood or property, etc is much more than people living in other countries such as UK, India and so forth?

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